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#3801 Panzermann

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Posted 03 September 2019 - 1536 PM

Beat me to it!

 

bit scary how good resolution is nowadays. And how good amateur equipment has become to see those satellites orbitting earth. 

 

 

Soon we can measure dicks at nudist beaches. From space.  :ph34r:

 

 

 

bonus is on his channel, that Kerbal 2 is on the way. Didn't know that one was in the making.


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#3802 Jeff

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Posted 03 September 2019 - 1606 PM

 

Beat me to it!

 

bit scary how good resolution is nowadays. And how good amateur equipment has become to see those satellites orbitting earth. 

 

 

Soon we can measure dicks at nudist beaches. From space.  :ph34r:

 

 

 

bonus is on his channel, that Kerbal 2 is on the way. Didn't know that one was in the making.

 

 

A "space imaging expert" had publicly doubted it was from a spy satellite, she stated that it must have been from a drone or a recon plane as the resolution was too good. She's enjoying a nice plate of crow right now. A bit damaging to the "expert" part of her title.


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#3803 BansheeOne

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Posted 03 September 2019 - 1649 PM

Particularly since resolution of the late KH series has been reported to be in the three to four inch range for some time. Though I believe this is the first publicly released image that would confirm it.
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#3804 Josh

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Posted 04 September 2019 - 1429 PM

The unit in question is probably 2nd tier at this point, though my understanding is sheer physical mirror size puts an absolute upper limit to resolution at a given orbit.


Edited by Josh, 04 September 2019 - 1429 PM.

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#3805 Soren Ras

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 0119 AM

The unit in question is probably 2nd tier at this point, though my understanding is sheer physical mirror size puts an absolute upper limit to resolution at a given orbit.

 

Obviously it is corect that mirror size is a limit, although it is astounding how much additional resolution you can get to by taking several pictures and applying serious computer power to image processing.  The small differences in pixel intensity (brightness) in the same area over different images of the same object can be used to get much sharper images than is possible from just one image. That was essentially what I was doing for my Master's thesis twenty years ago when working with optical images of galactic globular clusters, and the computing power and software I had available was pathetic compared to what is cheaply and commercially available today, to say nothing of what the NRO boys will have access to.

 

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#3806 Panzermann

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Posted 05 September 2019 - 1427 PM

to say nothing of what the NRO boys will have access to.

 

 

Just a question of how big the computing cluster is. nVidia and AMD are selling their pro cards for exactly these purposes. And AI of course.


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#3807 JasonJ

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Posted 02 October 2019 - 1028 AM

https://blogs.nasa.g...to-japan-day-1/

https://blogs.nasa.g...to-japan-day-2/


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#3808 Nobu

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Posted 03 October 2019 - 1556 PM

 

The unit in question is probably 2nd tier at this point, though my understanding is sheer physical mirror size puts an absolute upper limit to resolution at a given orbit.

 

Obviously it is corect that mirror size is a limit, although it is astounding how much additional resolution you can get to by taking several pictures and applying serious computer power to image processing.  The small differences in pixel intensity (brightness) in the same area over different images of the same object can be used to get much sharper images than is possible from just one image. That was essentially what I was doing for my Master's thesis twenty years ago when working with optical images of galactic globular clusters, and the computing power and software I had available was pathetic compared to what is cheaply and commercially available today, to say nothing of what the NRO boys will have access to.

 

--

Soren

 

 

The question is whether the advance in computing power over the past 20 years will be sustainable over the next 20. I certainly hope so, as advances in the quality of life for the planet will follow.


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#3809 RETAC21

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 1507 PM

Scott Manley visits SOFIA - a 10 on the kewlness scale:

 

https://youtu.be/eNjHvbqYkB0


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#3810 Panzermann

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Posted 21 October 2019 - 1525 PM

 
AFRL Dispatching Satellite to Examine Unresponsive Smallsat
10/18/2019
​​—RACHEL S. COHEN
 
 
One experimental Air Force satellite on Oct. 20 will begin inspecting another that stopped talking to the ground in March, the Air Force Research Laboratory said in an Oct. 17 release.
 
The rendezvous marks the first time AFRL has launched a mission to check on and resolve a spacecraft’s problems on orbit in real time.
 
AFRL’s Small Satellite Space Surveillance System (S5), built by Colorado-based Blue Canyon Technologies, launched Feb. 22 to test out new space situational awareness approaches. But researchers have not been able to communicate with the mute S5 since March.
 
“Operators confirm that the spacecraft is alive and maintaining solar power by tracking the sun, but without communications, S5 cannot perform its experiments,” according to the release.
 
Without humans in the neighborhood to check on S5, AFRL must rely on Mycroft. The smallsat launched in April 2018 to conduct SSA and satellite inspection experiments. Its missions also include learning about and improving autonomous navigation as well as how satellites can meet up with and work on other spacecraft.
 
“Mycroft satellite operators will initiate a series of maneuvers to rendezvous with S5” in geosynchronous orbit, AFRL said. “Mycroft will inspect the S5 satellite and provide operators with verification of the fully-deployed solar array and of the sun-pointing orientation. Mycroft will then examine the exterior of the S5 spacecraft to search for damaged components such as the solar array and antennas.”
 
S5’s checkup will last several weeks. AFRL said it will transition operations to Air Force Space Command later this year.

​

 

http://www.airforcem...es/2019/October2019/AFRL-Dispatching-Satellite-to-Examine-Unresponsive-Smallsat.aspx


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#3811 JasonJ

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Posted 04 November 2019 - 0422 AM

SpaceX satellite based internet service called Starlink.

 

[...]

Musk has said SpaceX will need at least 400 Starlink satellites in orbit for "minor" broadband coverage, and 800 satellites aloft for "moderate" coverage. The initial Starlink plan called for a megaconstellation of 12,000 satellites, and SpaceX recenty filed paperwork with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) to launch another 30,000 satellites. The ITU is a United Nations agency that manages the global satellite radio-frequency spectrum, among other things.

[...]

https://www.space.co...rvice-2020.html


Edited by JasonJ, 04 November 2019 - 0422 AM.

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#3812 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 05 November 2019 - 0609 AM

Universe may be curved, according to new study.

https://www.livescie...-be-curved.html


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#3813 DB

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 0728 AM

To be clear, this is about the universe being closed rather than open. It's not a new concept, really, but went out of fashion about when I graduated.

In my opinion, there are just too many fudges with the modern state of cosmology to have much confidence in any of them.
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#3814 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 0740 AM

It kind of reminds me of advice from doctors, anything they tell you is good for you is proven wrong 10 years later, and vice versa.

 

Interesting anyway.


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#3815 Panzermann

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 1500 PM

To be clear, this is about the universe being closed rather than open. It's not a new concept, really, but went out of fashion about when I graduated.

In my opinion, there are just too many fudges with the modern state of cosmology to have much confidence in any of them.

 

Seems to this outside observer like the astronomers are swinging between different fashions of which theoretical possibility of the shape of the universe is the one we live in. 


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#3816 Ssnake

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Posted 08 November 2019 - 0540 AM

A lot hinges on observed data, and there's been tremendous improvements in measurement engineering that allow refinements. At the same time there always is a barrier where data get lost in noise, or are increasingly unrealiable. A good illustration for that is the struggle to eastablish the Hubble constant where currently three different methodologies (Alpha Cepheids, Red Giants, or Supernova observations) yield three different values, each with an error bar that rules out some compromise unfortunately.

 

For those areas where the data are inconclusive or the error bar is rather large, well, that's the domain of mathematical modelling which can be subject to fashions as you call them (or what the majority of scientists finds most plausible; the problem is that what's considered "plausible" is not always rationally chosen).

 

Enjoyable reading: Lost in Math by Sabine Hossenfelder.

To watch, for Germans: 

 

English variant, skip the first five minutes or so without sound:


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#3817 Panzermann

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Posted 08 November 2019 - 1324 PM

For those areas where the data are inconclusive or the error bar is rather large, well, that's the domain of mathematical modelling which can be subject to fashions as you call them (or what the majority of scientists finds most plausible; the problem is that what's considered "plausible" is not always rationally chosen).

 

 

That is why I called it fashions, because they often choose a mathmatic model out of a feeling. Or a sense of symmetry or beauty. Or a sense of plausability. which can be wrong of course, as they are humans after all.


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#3818 JasonJ

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 0934 AM

...

"The mission is going smoothly. If no surprise, the Mars explorer is going to be launched in 2020, and land before 2021," said Ye Jianpei, chief scientist of Space Science and Deep-space Exploration with the Chinese Space Technology Academy.

...

marschina.jpg

https://news.cgtn.co...SYbm/index.html


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#3819 JasonJ

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 1902 PM

Growing ESA and CNSA cooperation.
Spoiler
https://www.google.c...hina/a-45644847

Spoiler
https://www.esa.int/...sion_with_China

Edited by JasonJ, 12 November 2019 - 1908 PM.

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#3820 JasonJ

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Posted 14 November 2019 - 0842 AM

Interesting PRC Mars lander practice.

marschina1.jpg

 

marschina2.jpg

https://twitter.com/...851676693450752


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