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Protests In Hong Kong


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#661 JasonJ

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Posted 20 October 2019 - 1929 PM

Singapore PM says the 5 demands are unrealistic but also that housing problem needs to be solved.
Spoiler
https://www.bloomber...ngapore-pm-says

Edited by JasonJ, 20 October 2019 - 1929 PM.

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#662 BansheeOne

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 0447 AM

China Is Considering Replacing Hong Kong’s Lam, Pro-Beijing Lawmaker Says


By Blake Schmidt and Iain Marlow
23. Oktober 2019, 10:06 MESZ
  • Michael Tien confirms report that Lam may be replaced in 2020
  • Chinese President Xi Jinping yet to decide: Financial Times

The Chinese government is considering a plan to replace Hong Kong’s Carrie Lam as chief executive, pro-establishment lawmaker Michael Tien said, in a potential strategy shift by Beijing as pro-democracy demonstrations continue to rock the Asian financial center.

 

Tien said he has information from Beijing that the government was considering candidates to fill Hong Kong’s top job next year. His comments came after the Financial Times reported, citing unidentified people briefed on the deliberations, that an “interim” chief executive would be installed by March if President Xi Jinping decides to carry out the plan.

 

“They recently assessed that this could go on for a while,” Tien said in an interview on Wednesday. “Dragging this thing out is actually bad for everyone, for Hong Kong, the police. So now they need to sort of take action. And I have heard it’s going to be next year, probably February or March.”

 

Lam’s replacement wouldn’t necessarily stay on for a full five-year term. Tien said Beijing was weighing two different scenarios: Either appointing a “caretaker” who would serve the remainder of Lam’s term, or try out someone who could conceivably stay on after the next election for chief executive in 2022. Tien said a replacement would need to be elected by the 1,200-member election committee.

 

A spokesman for Lam’s office declined to comment on the speculation over her position.

 

The Financial Times said Norman Chan, former head of the Hong Kong Monetary Authority, and Henry Tang, who previously served city’s No. 2 official, were leading candidates to succeed Lam. Both Tang and Chan declined to comment on the FT report Wednesday.

 

China’s foreign ministry on Wednesday said the central government still firmly supports Lam, reiterating Beijing’s long-standing position.

“This is a political rumor with ulterior motives,” spokeswoman Hua Chunying told reporters at a regular briefing.

 

Replacing Lam would represent a delicate reversal for Xi’s Communist Party, which doesn’t want to give a victory to protesters demanding direct elections. Still, Beijing is under pressure to ease months of unrest, which has helped push the city toward recession and provided ammunition to the party’s critics from Taipei to Washington.

 

[...]

 

https://www.bloomber...bd&cmpId=google


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#663 JasonJ

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 0128 AM

The sentiment to protest against central government at the basic level is spilling over to Catalonia, Spain.
Spoiler
https://www.google.c...p/idUSKBN1X308F
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#664 BansheeOne

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 0200 AM

Which unfortunately will play to Beijing's narrative that they're just another bunch of violent separatists the kind of which is frowned upon by mainstream Europe.

 

(I've been meaning to post on the new Catalonian unrest, but the topical thread is currently unavailable due to the ongoing technical problems.)

 

Meanwhile, the case which the HK administration seized upon to file the extradition law that started it all is going nowhere.

 

The murder behind the Hong Kong protests: A case where no-one wants the killer

 
By Cindy Sui
BBC News, Taipei
 
23 October 2019
 

On 17 February last year, a young Hong Kong couple's holiday in Taiwan went terribly wrong.

 

The night before they were due to leave, the couple bought a large pink suitcase at one of Taipei's popular night markets.

 

Their hotel's CCTV footage showed the couple returning to their room with the suitcase. That was the last time the 20-year-old woman, Poon Hiu-wing, was seen alive.

 

The next morning, the footage showed her boyfriend Chan Tong-kai, who was 19 at the time, taking the suitcase, along with other luggage, out of the room to check out.

 

There was no sign of Ms Poon.

 

Chan was later seen pushing the suitcase through Taipei's busy subway stations. He took a flight back to Hong Kong that evening, alone.

 

It was a month later, after Ms Poon's father came to Taiwan to report her missing, that her body was found hidden in bushes, about 20 metres from a popular riverside trail in neighbouring New Taipei City.

 

"There was a stench, but no one thought there would be a dead body there," said Mr Chou, a long-time local resident.

 

"Sometimes as many as 10,000 dead fish would float up in the river here and it would smell bad, so everyone thought it was just the smell of dead fish."

 

How did the case trigger the Hong Kong protests?
 

The Hong Kong authorities used Taiwan's request for Chan to be extradited as a reason for proposing a controversial bill to allow such extraditions.

 

The bill would have allowed criminal suspects to be sent to Taiwan, as well as mainland China.

 

The former British colony does not yet have an extradition agreement with Taiwan or mainland China. But many Hong Kongers took to the streets in protest at the plans.

 

Given China's human rights violations and heavily government-controlled judicial system, they feared the bill would harm Hong Kong's judicial autonomy, established under the "one country, two systems" principle.

 

Taiwan also strongly objected, accusing the Hong Kong government of using its request for Chan's extradition as an excuse to ram through the bill.

 

The bill has since been withdrawn due to widespread protests, but Chan's case is still in limbo.

 

[...]

 

How was the crime uncovered?

 

Chan was arrested on 13 March by Hong Kong police, two days after her parents reported her missing. He was later charged with four counts of dealing with proceeds from a crime, commonly called money laundering.

 

During the investigation, he confessed that he had killed Ms Poon and revealed where he had dumped the body, according to the court document.

Liu Guan-wu, a Zhuwei police officer at the time, said he and around 30 other officers found the body after a three-hour search.

 

"We were looking for the suitcase initially, because we thought the body was still inside the suitcase," said Mr Liu.

 

"But when we found her, it was just her body there. He didn't dismember her; he simply curved her body to stuff it inside the suitcase. She was not a tall girl and she was skinny.

 

"The body was decomposed. There were no signs of injury."

 

In Hong Kong, Chan pleaded guilty to money laundering and was sentenced to 29 months in prison, but the High Court reduced the sentence by a third.

 

On 18 October this year, days before Chan's release, the Hong Kong government released a statement about his "alleged offence" in Taiwan.

 

"The courts of Hong Kong have no jurisdiction over it," the statement said.

 

"Neither do the local authorities have any ground to extend Chan's detention or pursue the offence that he was alleged to have committed in Taiwan."

 

Why does no one want him?
 

The case has revealed the conflicted relations between Taiwan and Hong Kong - as well as the island and mainland China, which considers Taiwan a province that must be reunified one day.

 

It also highlights the unnatural state of affairs among the three sides - places so close to each other, but with no extradition or judicial cooperation agreements.

 

The long dispute over Taiwan's sovereignty - whether it's a part of China or not - makes forming such agreements, usually reached between countries, a very sensitive matter.

 

On Wednesday, the day he was released from Hong Kong's jail, Chan bowed deeply before a large crowd of TV cameras and journalists, apologised to Ms Poon's family, expressed hopes that she would rest in peace, and asked society for forgiveness.

 

But the bickering continued between Taiwan and Hong Kong.

 

Taiwan's authorities initially refused to accept Chan's surrender, even though they issued an arrest warrant for him.

 

They suspect the whole thing was orchestrated by Beijing to treat Taiwan as a part of China and had insisted Hong Kong first negotiate a judicial assistance agreement before handing over Chan.

 

Hong Kong's authorities dismissed that as "nonsense" and urged Taiwan to take a suspect willing to surrender himself, so as to give justice to Ms Poon and her family.

 

[...]

 

https://www.bbc.com/...-china-50148577


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#665 JasonJ

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Posted 31 October 2019 - 0706 AM

Lam's support rating nose diving in June to the current 20%.

lamsupportrating.jpg

https://www.pori.hk/...cheng-yuet-ngor


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#666 JasonJ

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 0843 AM

Pro-Beijing does knife attack and ear bite attack.

Spoiler

https://www.theguard...ck-in-hong-kong

earbite.jpg

https://twitter.com/...969215949234176


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#667 JasonJ

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 0846 AM

On November 4th, Xi met with Lam and endorsed her.

Spoiler

xilam1.jpg

 

xilam2.jpg

http://www.xinhuanet...c_138528299.htm


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#668 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 0852 AM

The protesters were all dressed in Guy Fawkes masks from V to remember November the 5th. Though that was a nice touch, probably lost on the Bejing crowd though.


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#669 JasonJ

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 0905 AM

The protesters were all dressed in Guy Fawkes masks from V to remember November the 5th. Though that was a nice touch, probably lost on the Bejing crowd though.

 

Yep, lots of them were wearing it, goes against the recent no-mask law too.


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#670 glenn239

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 0909 AM

Dumb question, but do masks prevent facial recognition software from identiying people if it's using wavelengths outside the visible spectrum?


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#671 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 0913 AM

 

The protesters were all dressed in Guy Fawkes masks from V to remember November the 5th. Though that was a nice touch, probably lost on the Bejing crowd though.

 

Yep, lots of them were wearing it, goes against the recent no-mask law too.

 

 

You know, I would love to know what Guido Fawkes would make of that, being seen 400 years later as a freedom fighter. Move over Che Guevara. :D


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#672 JasonJ

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 0937 AM

 

 

The protesters were all dressed in Guy Fawkes masks from V to remember November the 5th. Though that was a nice touch, probably lost on the Bejing crowd though.

 

Yep, lots of them were wearing it, goes against the recent no-mask law too.

https://www.youtube....h?v=ARfm9wR-26k

 

 

You know, I would love to know what Guido Fawkes would make of that, being seen 400 years later as a freedom fighter. Move over Che Guevara. :D

 

 

Maybe crying to the devil, stop, look look, at my influence, I should be in heaven now :D 


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#673 Ssnake

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Posted 07 November 2019 - 1201 PM

Dumb question, but do masks prevent facial recognition software from identiying people if it's using wavelengths outside the visible spectrum?

 

Yes.


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#674 BansheeOne

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Posted 09 November 2019 - 0854 AM

Hong Kong pro-democracy lawmakers detained, student mourned

 

By EILEEN NG 47 minutes ago
 

HONG KONG (AP) — Seven Hong Kong pro-democracy lawmakers were either detained or faced arrest Saturday, a move that could escalate public fury a day after the death of a university student linked to months of anti-government protests in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory.

 

Protesters vented their anger over Chow Tsz-Lok’s death and vowed not to give up their resistance at a police-approved prayer rally Saturday night, with frequent chants of “Hong Kong people, revenge” and “Free Hong Kong.”

 

The 22-year-old died Friday, succumbing to injuries four days after falling from a parking garage when police fired tear gas during clashes with protesters. Although the circumstance of his death is unclear, many blame police who have been accused of heavy-handed tactics including widespread use of tear gas and pepper spray since the unrest began in June.

 

Police said three lawmakers were detained Saturday and charged with obstructing the local assembly during a raucous May 11 meeting over a now-shelved China extradition bill that sparked five months of protests calling for democratic reforms.

 

The others received summons to turn up at police stations Saturday to face arrest. All seven are to appear in court Monday.

 

Pro-democracy lawmakers slammed the government clampdown as a calculated move after Chow’s death to provoke more violence as an excuse to postpone or cancel Nov. 24 district elections — polls viewed as a barometer of public sentiment amid the unrest.

 

[...]

 

Violence erupted late Friday when protesters took to the streets following memorial events in multiple locations to mark Chow’s death.

 

On Saturday night, thousands gathered at a Christian memorial service for Chow, singing hymns and laying white flowers and paper cranes at a makeshift stage in a downtown park.

 

It wasn’t clear what Chow was doing at the garage early Monday as mobs clashed with police in the streets below. Police have repeatedly denied that officers pushed him down and had delayed emergency services that delayed treatment.

 

[...]

 

There have been only a few fatalities during the unrest, including some reported deaths by suicide and a man who fell to his death while hanging pro-democracy banners on a building.

 

More than 3,300 people have been arrested in the movement, which has expanded to include calls for direct elections for the city’s leaders and other demands.

 

https://apnews.com/9...ed8a0d875b0e654


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#675 JasonJ

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Posted 10 November 2019 - 2213 PM

A protester was shot by HK police.
https://www.google.c...d-asia-50370715
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#676 DB

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 0601 AM



Dumb question, but do masks prevent facial recognition software from identiying people if it's using wavelengths outside the visible spectrum?

 
Yes.
Unless they're microwaving people...

:o

Is joke, no?
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#677 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 0613 AM

Ah, but would you microwave someone you dont know? Seems terribly rude. Although they are communists, so there is that...

 

Schools and colleges have been shut down as a safety precaution. Which probably means there is going to be even more young people on the street with nothing to do but throw kerb stones.

https://www.bbc.co.u...-china-50384360


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#678 Blunt Eversmoke

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Posted Yesterday, 01:03 PM

A protester was shot by HK police.
https://www.google.c...d-asia-50370715

Wasn't a Heckler&Koch zealot, I take it.


Sorry, could not resist.

Edited by Blunt Eversmoke, Yesterday, 01:07 PM.

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