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Notre Dame Cathedral On Fire


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#41 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 0207 AM

Many thanks to Mr Moderator or whoever it was for fixing the title. I promise to get that finger trouble fixed in future.

 

They many have dodged a bullet. Last night they were saying if the North Tower went, which is the left hand tower, it would be a total loss. And there were flames inside it, which you could see on the TV footage. Somehow the French Fire Brigade got up there, and you saw it in seconds being reduced to steam and they managed to save it. So you have the facade and the bell's, which is quite a lot left to work with. The spire is a sad loss, but it was victorian, and not part of the original building. Perhaps an opportunity for a 21st Century architect to make their contribution.

 

They were saying on BBC that this is more than St Pauls in London burning down, this is kind of like losing Parliament and maybe the Tower of London as well. Its endured so much, and then goes up like this from a silly accident.

 

Kind of shows the value of flying buttresses as an architectural feature I guess. They are the main reason why Coventry Cathedral is still standing, sort of.


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#42 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 0209 AM

 

Tragic, but as has been noted, a number of historic cathedrals were destroyed in the 1940s and have been rebuilt. It's probably worth the money to rebuild just for tourism's sake.

 

They are surprisingly robust structures (Cologne here)

 

d71bfe677cd3b267a5dd6400166d3144.jpg

 

It's the countless pieces of art that have vanished that will be most difficult to replace.  I wonder how much the building suffered during the French Revolution, as the Temple of Reason.

 

 

It was stripped out. So much of whats in the interior would appear to date from after then. The main loss would appear to be the windows, so its a relief that some of them have survived.

 

I remember that Napoleon had at least one of the bells melted down to make cannon ball's. That was only just replaced a few years ago.


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#43 sunday

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 0214 AM

Some points I've gleaned:

- Fire started after workers left the site.
- Not the first time the rose windows have been destroyed.
- Inner ceiling of the nave is mainly unaffected.
- Most of the art treasures, and relics were saved, as R011 wrote.
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#44 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 0324 AM

Report on CNN that the organ 'Might possibly' have survived and is restorable. Supposedly many of the pews inside also seem to have survived, remarkably. But I guess we wont know the extent of the damage till we see photos of the interior.


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#45 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 0345 AM

Reportedly on CNN, all the key windows have been saved. On the negative side, the roof was supposedly made from a wood that is no longer available.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 16 April 2019 - 0345 AM.

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#46 Murph

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 0517 AM

Ok, I am very happy they saved so much, now the rebuilding begins.  As for the wood, I suspect the world can help find some. Thank G_d that the stained glass has been saved.


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#47 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 0529 AM

Well sadly not all of it, clearly the rose window has gone, which clearly had elements of 12 and 13th Century glass in it.

http://therosewindow...-Dame/table.htm

 

That said, there is still a great industry dedicated to keeping windows like this alive. If anything, the skill set has improved in recent years. I gather recent restorations to York Cathedral have succeeded in repairing some fairly heavy handed bodging in the 1950's. So either side of the Channel there is more than enough skill set to put it back together.

 

Speaking of Yorkminster, there was a bad fire there in 1984, that required a lot of restoration.

http://news.bbc.co.u...000/2498525.stm

Its clear that what happened to Notre Dame is considerably worse. The entire roof there looks to be gone.


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#48 Jeff

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 0628 AM

Perhaps an opportunity for a 21st Century architect to make their contribution.

 

 

That could be a worse disaster than the fire.  :glare:


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#49 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 0634 AM

Not really. The spire that they put on it was a 19th Century addition. I dont think anything, barring perhaps a mobile phone mast, would be any worse.

 

Rose window seems to have survived, though there may have been damage to it. The one above it seems to be gone however. There is a report that some paintings have also been lost.

 

Interior photographs seem to show that at least some of the vaulting has survived. So they seem to have quite a lot to work with.

 

 

 

Report on the BBC that they didnt want to close it down for full restoration because they were frightened of turning away tourists. Which seems to have been a short sighted decision to put it mildly.


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#50 Ivanhoe

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 0723 AM

https://www.wired.co...ure-of-history/
 

As a landmark, Notre Dame lives on in uncountable drawings, paintings, and photographs, not to mention the memories of people who visited, worshipped, and listened to music amid its incomparable acoustics. But because it survived largely intact into the digital era, Notre Dame lives on in the virtual world, too—and that may make its restoration all the more complete. For the last half-decade or so, an architectural historian named Andrew Tallon worked with laser scanners to capture the entirety of the cathedral’s interior and exterior in meticulous 3D point clouds. His billion points of light revealed a living structure; the magnificent flying buttresses had indeed held the walls true, but the Gallery of Kings, statues on the western facade, were a foot out of plumb, Tallon told National Geographic in 2015.


https://nypost.com/2...dame-cathedral/

 

François-Henri Pinault — chairman and CEO of Kering, the French-based luxury group behind Gucci, Balenciaga, Yves Saint Laurent and other world-renowned brands — has pledged over $110 million towards the rebuilding of the Notre Dame cathedral.

Pinault, who is married to actress Salma Hayek, said in a statement that he plans to pay through his family’s investment firm, Artemis, for any work that needs to be done following Monday’s catastrophic fire, according to AFP.

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#51 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 0753 AM

Thats really very excellent news.

 

From what I understand it, the measurement system on cathedrals of this era was largely bespoke. They agreed what a foot would be, then worked from that, so there would appear to be quite a lot of variety even among places that may have been built at the same time. So that they likely have it all recorded means they could go back and CAD it. Which means they are going to get it pretty close to how it was.

 

I can forgive them for getting measurements wrong. St Pauls was built a good 3 centuries later, and they had a remarkable degree of settlement on one side of the building. Today you can go in there and see where the building has settled whilst it was building. So the builders ignored it and just kept on building.  Most people dont even notice it now.


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#52 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 0807 AM

notre-dame-754.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&


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#53 sunday

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 2154 PM

Video of the nave after the fire

 

https://twitter.com/...269584665001984

 

Could have been way worse.


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#54 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 0157 AM

Macron says he is going to have it done in 5 years. Considering it took over a hundred years to build, I feel he is being a trifle overoptimistic. Even the relatively small repair at York took 4.


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#55 Ivanhoe

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 0634 AM

Yeah, I understand the urge for speed, but they need to take their time and make 1000 year repairs, not 10 year repairs. 


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#56 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 0644 AM

Exactly. Supposedly he wants it done for the 2024 Olympics. Which I think is missing the point, a Cathedral is for the ages, not special occasions. Its going to take months just to season the wood they are going to put back in the roof. When they find it.

 

Also, they dont seem to intend to replace the spire as built, they are going to put that out to international tender for architects to submit their own contributions. I just hope its more successful than the Pyramid in the Louvre.

 

 

Hearing a bit more today about the evacuation, apparently the Cathedral had an evacuation plan worked out for contingencies like this, which is why they seem to have been so successful in getting so much out.


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#57 Rick

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 0655 AM

notre-dame-754.jpg?quality=90&strip=all&

Psalm 46:10


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#58 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 0707 AM

If you like that, you will probably appreciate this.

 

Coventry_Cathedral_burnt_cross.jpg

 

 

https://en.wikipedia..._Cross_of_Nails

The Charred Cross and the Cross of Nails were created after the cathedral was bombed during the Coventry Blitz of the Second World War. The cathedral stonemason, Jock Forbes, saw two wooden beams lying in the shape of a cross and tied them together. A replica of the Charred Cross built in 1964 has replaced the original in the ruins of the old cathedral on an altar of rubble. The original is now kept on the stairs linking the cathedral with St Michael's Hall below.

The Cross of Nails was made of three nails from the roof truss of the old cathedral by Provost Richard Howard of Coventry Cathedral at the suggestion of a young friend, The Rev. A.P. Wales. It was later transferred to the new cathedral, where it sits in the centre of the altar cross. It has become a symbol of peace and reconciliation across the world. There are over 330 Cross of Nails Centres all over the world, all of them bearing a cross made of three nails from the ruins, similar to the original one. When there were no more of these nails, a continuing supply have come from a prison in Germany. They are co-ordinated by the International Centre for Reconciliation.

 
 

One of the crosses made of nails from the old cathedral was donated to the Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church in Berlin, which was destroyed by Allied bombing and is also kept as a ruin alongside a newer building. A replica of the cross of nails was also donated to the Chapel of Reconciliation (Kapelle der Versöhnung) which forms part of the Berlin Wall Memorial. A copy of the Stalingrad Madonna by Kurt Reuber that was drawn in 1942 in Stalingrad (now Volgograd) is shown in the cathedrals of all three cities (Berlin, Coventry and Volgograd) as a sign of the reconciliation of the three countries that were once enemies.

A medieval cross of nails has also been carried on board all British warships which subsequently bear the name HMS Coventry.[16] The cross of nails was on board the Type 42 destroyer Coventry when she was sunk by enemy action in the Falklands War. The cross was salvaged by Royal Navy divers, and presented to Coventry Cathedral by the ship's Captain and colleagues.[17] The cross was subsequently presented first to the next Coventry in 1988 until she was decommissioned in 2002, and then to HMS Diamond, which is affiliated to Coventry, during her commissioning ceremony on 6 May 2011 by Captain David Hart-Dyke, the commanding officer of Coventry when she was sunk.[18]

BBC broadcast a documentary in 1962 entitled Act of Faith, narrated by Leo Genn, detailed the history of Coventry Cathedral, its destruction and rebuilding.[19]


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#59 Rick

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 0719 AM

Thank you Stuart!


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#60 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 0723 AM

Well worth visiting if you are ever in Britain. I remember seeing it as a child and it stuck with me. 

 

My Grandfather, a veteran, wasnt particularly happy with the new cathedral though. Not to all tastes.


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