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Fountain Pens And Their Advantages


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#1 Murph

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1001 AM

I have been using fountain pens for a number of years at the suggestion of my doctor.  He told me that if you either have or are at risk for carpal tunnel issues, a fountain pen is ideal.  I have used Shaeffer pens for years mostly due to the cartridge filling system.  But I just got a Pilot with a converter and bottle ink.  Very nice.  I really like that it makes my handwriting look better than with a regular pen, and there is also little to no hand strain.  I tend to prefer a medium nib, but there are some nice fine point pens.  My next goal is to get a Mont Blanc 149 pen.  I have also started using bottled ink, and rather like it. 

 

Anyone else use fountain pens?  Anyone else care? 


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#2 DKTanker

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1011 AM

I have been using fountain pens for a number of years at the suggestion of my doctor.  He told me that if you either have or are at risk for carpal tunnel issues, a fountain pen is ideal.  I have used Shaeffer pens for years mostly due to the cartridge filling system.  But I just got a Pilot with a converter and bottle ink.  Very nice.  I really like that it makes my handwriting look better than with a regular pen, and there is also little to no hand strain.  I tend to prefer a medium nib, but there are some nice fine point pens.  My next goal is to get a Mont Blanc 149 pen.  I have also started using bottled ink, and rather like it. 

 

Anyone else use fountain pens?  Anyone else care? 

Have you ever given thought to a rollerball or gel-ink pen?


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#3 Der Zeitgeist

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1016 AM

At work, it's just something classy when a colleague pulls out his fountain pen and bound notebook at a meeting, while everyone else is scrawling around on scraps of paper with cheap plastic ballpoint pens.

 

I thought about getting one myself, but I'd probably lose it within a week, as my writing utensils are usually scattered around on different desks at home and in the office as well as in different bags and backpacks.


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#4 Murph

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1123 AM

I have used them, I just find a fountain pen better for me.  I use rollerball pens when I have to use carbon paper.

 

I have been using fountain pens for a number of years at the suggestion of my doctor.  He told me that if you either have or are at risk for carpal tunnel issues, a fountain pen is ideal.  I have used Shaeffer pens for years mostly due to the cartridge filling system.  But I just got a Pilot with a converter and bottle ink.  Very nice.  I really like that it makes my handwriting look better than with a regular pen, and there is also little to no hand strain.  I tend to prefer a medium nib, but there are some nice fine point pens.  My next goal is to get a Mont Blanc 149 pen.  I have also started using bottled ink, and rather like it. 

 

Anyone else use fountain pens?  Anyone else care? 

Have you ever given thought to a rollerball or gel-ink pen?

 


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#5 Murph

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1128 AM

Try this one: https://www.amazon.com/Pilot-Prera-Light-Medium-Fountain/dp/B0078SI306/ref=sr_1_13_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1515687920&sr=8-13&keywords=pilot+prera+fountain+pen   or this one:  https://www.amazon.c...28S74EQHE39MPD2

At work, it's just something classy when a colleague pulls out his fountain pen and bound notebook at a meeting, while everyone else is scrawling around on scraps of paper with cheap plastic ballpoint pens.

 

I thought about getting one myself, but I'd probably lose it within a week, as my writing utensils are usually scattered around on different desks at home and in the office as well as in different bags and backpacks.


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#6 chino

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1154 AM

I use a fountain pen because I just like the retro-ness of it.

 

I first started using fountain pens when I was in my twenties. And off and on after that. And now in my 50's, I bought a cheapo Lamy and rediscovered my love for fountain pens - as impractical as they are. But it seems to fit my old age. I rummaged through my stuff and found some decades old fountain pens still working.

 

The one I use most regularly today is my Caran d'Ache Dunas. I bought this more than 10 years ago, not a premium model and probably costs around USD100 back then. But it is the most smooth-writing pen I have.

 

Cddsbfp34.jpgCddsbfp36.jpg

 

And a bottle of ink (below) that is now discontinued. It is half used but it still works.:

 

CD-CaribbeanSea-BS.jpg

 

I prefer broad nibs, and like a firearm, the feed system is very important. I find piston cartridge converter (below) refill system to be most practical. I don't like pre-filled cartridges as the whole joy of using a fountain pen is lost. (And because I'm a snob.)

 

 

The worst of the lot are squeeze converter refill system (below). They are absolute shite and the bladder loses its elasticity if you don't use it for a long time:

how_to_fill_squeeze_converters.jpg


Edited by chino, 11 January 2018 - 1306 PM.

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#7 MiloMorai

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1155 AM

il_fullxfull.301342544.jpg


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#8 chino

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1200 PM

Another fountain pen I really treasure is my Harley Davidson. But it no longer works because I bought it in the 1990's and I didn't know how to take care and clean them back then.

 

s-l1600.jpg

 

The top one is the fountain pen.

 

Again, with a broad nib.

s-l1600.jpg


Edited by chino, 11 January 2018 - 1208 PM.

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#9 Murph

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1209 PM

I use Pilot's Kon-Peki color ink in my Pilot.  It is a nice color and looks good.  My Shaeffers use their blue cartridges and looks good.  It fits me well since I have gotten older as well.  I just like them impractical as they are.  

 

https://www.artofman...-fountain-pens/


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#10 Mobius

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1238 PM

I used them in high school for awhile because I thought they looked neat.  But got tired of changing the ink cartridge and inky fiber clogged tip.  Plus they weren't good with multi-paged carbon forms. 


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#11 bd1

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1506 PM

writing with fountain pens was obligatory from 1-st to 4th grade in my school days. was it in all soviet union or just estonia, i don´t know.  the pens were of soviet quality , ink too and most important item was drying paper. since i am left-handed, i dragged the ink all over the papers etc.  

 

at the end of fourth grade i laid all my fountain pens and parts of them i found at home, on a railway track in front of the train.  :wub:


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#12 Roman Alymov

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1523 PM

writing with fountain pens was obligatory from 1-st to 4th grade in my school days. was it in all soviet union or just estonia, i don´t know.  the pens were of soviet quality , ink too and most important item was drying paper. since i am left-handed, i dragged the ink all over the papers etc.  

 

at the end of fourth grade i laid all my fountain pens and parts of them i found at home, on a railway track in front of the train.  :wub:

I went to Soviet school in 1982, and we were using regular ball pens right from the beginning – for me stories about “fountain pens was obligatory” were just tales told by my parents about their school years. It is generally believed only fountain pens allow children to develop really good writing with correct pressure and variable lines, so you teachers were taking good care of you (whatever you think of them). As for me, I used automatic fountain pens in high school and university – because just enjoying the process of writing with them.


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#13 Jeff

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1526 PM

il_fullxfull.301342544.jpg

 

Younguns!

 

flintstone_1.jpg


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#14 APF

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1556 PM

Did anybody try a glass pen (apart from myself)? I know the merits of fountain pens, i.e. the tip will bend after a year or so (bend back, gets bend again, etc. until it looks like a feet of MAD's Don Martin). I'm very heavy-handed when writing, sort of like to engrave the letters into the paper, so the metal ones don't last that long. Happily switched to pallpoints - parker, that is, those cheap ones just don't work for f*cks sake - and honestly those few words I write each week don't merit a large investment.

But I'm tempted to switch to a glass pen. Tried it at the end of last year and wrote a letter to an old friend for X-mas, liked the feeling (and it'd be c00l, of course!).


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#15 Ssnake

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1720 PM

I like a gel pen best, a (regrettably discontinued) Vega Pilot G7. It probably won't last as long as I have supplies of replacement catridges, Anyway, whenever a ball point is involved, I think what's good for tanks is also good for pens - tungsten. Steel balls simply deform too much, leaving more blobs of ink than are absolutely necessary, and probably degrading faster because of it. The writing experience is nice and smooth, it allows for nuanced writing, but it skips all the hassle that true fountain pen lovers so covet. It's a pragmatic choice that works for me, is all I'm saying.


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#16 Panzermann

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1734 PM

Glass pen? Never heard of such, but should be useable material. If you have a problem with bent nibs, try either models that har supported (hidden) in the pen and/or different hardnesses and nib cuts. It changes alot how a pen writes.

 

 

In school it was obligatory to learn writing with a pen in germany. But I cannot tell when pupils started changing over to mostly biros. Maybe started in 6th form that it was not enforced anymore? Alas I used a pen most of the time. Either a Lamy with those weird long cartridges or a Pelikan with gold nib, engraved name etc that I think was gifted in 10th form toe in a set with pencil and biro. Even in university I continued using them. But in lab work, writing a grocery lists or at work some advert swag biro has to do.

 

 

Or a pencil. A good pencil of the right hardness is a surprisingly comfortable writing instrument. And remember: a 6B hardness (or rather softness) quality pencil is mandatory for your field gear, because it is water resistent and writes even in space.


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#17 Rick

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1812 PM

As bad as my writing and printing is, the type of writing instrument is not the problem  :unsure:


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#18 Ssnake

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 1825 PM

As long as you can read yourself your writing's just fine. :)


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#19 APF

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 0048 AM

In school it was obligatory to learn writing with a pen in germany.

Yes. And as i hinted at I got through 5 or 6 Pelikans during the few years they were mandatory (7th grade?).


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#20 Harold Jones

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 0053 AM

As long as you can read yourself your writing's just fine. :)

My handwriting is so bad these days that I have trouble deciphering ip addresses let alone the hostname scrawled next to them.  I can only imagine what I'd produce if I tried to use a fountain pen.


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