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British Ration Week--Forgotten Weapons Series


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#21 shep854

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 0858 AM

Ian's reaction when he attempts to eat is probably one of the most accurate moments of the series! ^_^


Edited by shep854, 25 January 2018 - 0859 AM.

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#22 bojan

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Posted 25 January 2018 - 1924 PM

 

They hated it. Im tempted to put it down to a simple dislike along the lines of Brits dont drink Coffee, Americans dont eat fish and chips, but my father, when we watched a documentary on it expressed a loathing of it. Whether he actually ever tried it is another matter of course. The point is, the ministry of food bought a job lot of the stuff and nobody wanted to eat it.

If they did not want to eat it than none was actually hungry, so all was good, and you had reserve in case SRHTF.

 

 

Horses, yes im sure you are right, but its not the way we Brits treat our horses. That we delve into doing such things shows a degree of desperation that in other nations might be seen by delving into the cats and dogs.

Horses were adored in in the 19th/1st half of 20th century Serbia*, but they were also eaten regularly. Actually, horse meat was routinely prescribed by doctors for anemia and was considered high class fare (since horses were expensive). Again, proving that none was hungry in UK or even close to it in WW2**.

 

*Horse was considered a status symbol, as they were expensive, most peasants did plowing and other work with oxen. There was also a fact that they were "freedom status" as during the Ottoman occupation ownership of the horses was mostly prohibited by Turks.

 

**One of my favorite stories that a grandfather told about his day in partisans was about Italian cook who managed to make a meat stew when they were really hungry. Everyone was happy until someone asked cook where did he get a meat as they realized none had gone foraging. Cook, having only basic understanding of the Serbo-Croatian only said "Meow". None stopped eating, only someone said "Fucking Italian cat-eaters" Which was kinda ironic if you think about that...

As a consequence of the 4 years spent in the partisans grandfather knew probably every single edible plant you could find.

 

Point being that people will eat any animal if they are really hungry, all respect toward horses is worth zero when your choice is between eating and not eating.


Edited by bojan, 25 January 2018 - 1929 PM.

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#23 shep854

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Posted 26 January 2018 - 0821 AM


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#24 shep854

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 0959 AM

Last episode:


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#25 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 1113 AM

Well nobody was starving, thats clear. But if nobody was hungry, one has to explain the rise of the Spiv and the rise of the illegal meat trade. Im thinking of that film 'A Private Function' where they raise a pig on the QT without declaring it. I get the impression this was not uncommon.


It was certainly nowhere near as bad as the continent. When my Grandfather came home from Germany, he was skin and bone. Then you have Denmark which was starving to death, so we had to start food bombing them.

Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 27 January 2018 - 1113 AM.

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#26 shep854

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Posted 27 January 2018 - 1434 PM

In the comments, Ian said he lost 2 lb, though he never left the table hungry.
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#27 DougRichards

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 0346 AM

Last episode:

 

The British would never have used knives and forks in that way.


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#28 shep854

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Posted 30 January 2018 - 0921 AM

Those bloody Yanks... :P


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#29 DougRichards

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 0558 AM

Those bloody Yanks... :P

Not that I can complain: most of the time these days I use what we call a splade:


Edited by DougRichards, 03 February 2018 - 0246 AM.

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#30 shep854

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 0857 AM

This?

220px-Spork.jpg


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#31 Rick

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 0929 AM

Wonder if the Germans, Italians, Japanese and Soviet civilians had a similar system? Although I would think the Soviets had it worse. Much worse. 


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#32 Ivanhoe

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Posted 31 January 2018 - 1048 AM

Last episode:

 
The British would never have used knives and forks in that way.

 
https://en.wikipedia...ensil_etiquette
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#33 DougRichards

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 0244 AM

This?

220px-Spork.jpg

something like that

 

splade_486c59d21837c.jpg

 

Notice the cutting edges


Edited by DougRichards, 03 February 2018 - 0245 AM.

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#34 Sardaukar

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 0418 AM

This?

220px-Spork.jpg

 

That is "spork". Most moronic invention ever.

 

This is way to go:

 

mil-tec_lusikka-haarukka.jpg


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#35 Adam_S

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 0535 AM

In the comments, Ian said he lost 2 lb, though he never left the table hungry.

 

In many ways, the WW2 diet was very healthy. It was low in fats and sugars and there was widespread issuing of vitamin supplements for the general population. IIRC for a lot of poorer people, their diet actually improved with the introduction of rationing. I haven't watched all of Ian's videos yet so I don't know if he talks about it, but another important source of food came from back garden veggie patches, allotments and illicit chooks or pigs being fattened up on leftovers. My mum can remember growing up in Bristol in the 1950's and she always had a "pet" chicken or two in the back garden. It took a while for her to make the connection between her "pet" disappearing and a nice roast chicken dinner on a Sunday.


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#36 shep854

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 0917 AM

 

In the comments, Ian said he lost 2 lb, though he never left the table hungry.

 

In many ways, the WW2 diet was very healthy. It was low in fats and sugars and there was widespread issuing of vitamin supplements for the general population. IIRC for a lot of poorer people, their diet actually improved with the introduction of rationing. I haven't watched all of Ian's videos yet so I don't know if he talks about it, but another important source of food came from back garden veggie patches, allotments and illicit chooks or pigs being fattened up on leftovers. My mum can remember growing up in Bristol in the 1950's and she always had a "pet" chicken or two in the back garden. It took a while for her to make the connection between her "pet" disappearing and a nice roast chicken dinner on a Sunday.

 

Yes, Ian does go into those points, including how the gov't didn't get upset over 'grey market' barter.  What was a bit surprising was how little actual 'black marketeering' occurred.


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#37 Adam_S

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Posted 03 February 2018 - 1743 PM

Here's an interesting read. In 1939 some nutritionists from Cambridge University wanted to investigate what would happen if the U boat campaign completely cut off food imports to Britain. The short version is that people would end up eating a lot of turnips and brown bread but that aside from farting a lot and taking massive, fiber filled dumps, it would probably be OK.

 

https://www.theguard...econd-world-war

 

It would also be interesting to compare the British wartime diet with what people in the Soviet Union or, God forbid, Nazi occupied Europe ended up eating.


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#38 Adam_S

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 0009 AM

Just finished catching up on the series. Really interesting stuff.

 

With beer in short supply, I bet there was an explosion in home brewing. You can make decent wine out of parsnips, elderflowers and all manner of other stuff that grows in Britain. And of course there was always...

 


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#39 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 1346 PM

At the risk of going off topic (and kudos for citing the wurzels) but isnt it strange that moonshining like the US model has never taken off here? Ive not even read of anyone doing it during the war, when you would have assumed it would have gone through the roof. Strange thing that.

 

I think we got off lightly because bureaucracy was well prepared, with a memory of what happened in ww1. Somehow you just know it wouldnt work as well if it happened today.


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#40 Markus Becker

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Posted 04 February 2018 - 1404 PM

Wonder if the Germans, Italians, Japanese and Soviet civilians had a similar system? Although I would think the Soviets had it worse. Much worse. 

 

AFAIK the German system worked until the war ended and the country was devided into four occupation zones. They had trade barriers between them that tuned one single market into four rather seperated ones. The result were two hunger winters. A third probbaly didn't happen because the British and Americans began integrating the economies of their zones before the second began. 

 

PS: The Japanese very narrowly avoided a massive famine in 1946. If the war had gone just a bit longer the seed grain for 46 would have been issued as rations. 


Edited by Markus Becker, 04 February 2018 - 1406 PM.

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