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Aboard Japanese Sub In World War 2


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#1 shep854

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 0739 AM

Interesting that they had plants aboard.  Was this a regular practice?


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#2 shep854

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 0748 AM

Not quite as generic as dial, levers and wheels:


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#3 Nobu

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Posted 22 October 2019 - 1520 PM

Very interesting footage, especially WRT meal preparation aboard. If the meal was representative, it would seem those serving ate reasonably well.


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#4 Rick

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 0416 AM

Interesting that they had plants aboard.  Was this a regular practice?

Let's say it's not unusual for sailors to bring small reminders of home onboard. Spending several months at sea in confined spaces with only other -- usually young men -- can have its irritating moments. Ships are literally a home away from home. 


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#5 shep854

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 0725 AM

True.  In that environment, little things take on huge importance.  Keeping plants alive had to be a challenge.  I also wondered if they were able to grow enough to affect the atmosphere in the boat.


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#6 JasonJ

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 1004 AM

No mentioning of a flower which looks like ikebana (flower arrangement), but I was reminded of an interview not long ago with a war veteran that had served on a I-361 submarine. Some stories included how his sub commander directed the sub to dive to only a shallow depth of about 15 meters in order to avoid dept charges that were probably set for speculating deeper dive depths. Japanese subs went only to around 70 meters down. Explosions from underneath were heard. Another story was how towards the end, his submarine took the role of sending off the human suicide kaiten mini subs. In which he described his exchange of words with the former pilot then trained for the kaiten subs in the kaiten before sealing it off and launching the sub. It might be interesting one way or the other.

https://www.youtube....h?v=DEFxLIAqDjo


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#7 RETAC21

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 1159 AM

True.  In that environment, little things take on huge importance.  Keeping plants alive had to be a challenge.  I also wondered if they were able to grow enough to affect the atmosphere in the boat.

 

Submarines in WW2 spent most of their time in the surface, and Japanese subs weren't particularly good submarines being slow to dive and not very deep diving at that.


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#8 Nobu

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 1235 PM

The plants may have been more for the benefit of the camera (and the morale of those watching) than the crew, at least in wartime.


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#9 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 0829 AM

Well, the Japanese brought flowers, the Americans brought an ice cream machine. I mean no offence to those WW2 Japanese submariners, but I know which one I would rather have. :)

 

Great video btw.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 24 October 2019 - 0835 AM.

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#10 shep854

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Posted 24 October 2019 - 1046 AM

Wow, I wish the video JasonJ linked to had English translation or subtitles...

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US fleet subs also had air conditioning.  Earlier vessels were called 'pig boats' for a reason...


Edited by shep854, 24 October 2019 - 1048 AM.

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#11 Jeff

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Posted 27 October 2019 - 1139 AM

Wow, I wish the video JasonJ linked to had English translation or subtitles...

----

US fleet subs also had air conditioning.  Earlier vessels were called 'pig boats' for a reason...

 

And the air conditioning was more for the electronics and to keep the crew from keeling over than the modern version of cold, dry comfort. The early war patrols of the V boats show how dangerous the boats were without air conditioning. The Argonaut had major issues with this early on.


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#12 shep854

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Posted 11 November 2019 - 1550 PM


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