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Jmsdf US2 Flying Boat Accident

US2 flyingboat accident JMSDF

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#1 JasonJ

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 1104 AM

The article below in English. (my translation). There's a video of it half way in the water in the link.

 

http://headlines.yah...000076-nnn-soci

 

On 28th, off the coast of Ashizurimisaki of Kouchi prefecture, an accident occurred where an engine fell off of a JMSDF floatplane during training. There was a crew of 19 and 4 suffered light injury.

 

Before 3:00 in the afternoon on the 28th, off from Ashizurimisaki a JMSDF US2 floatplane that belonged to Air Station Iwakuni dropped one engine while it was training in takeoffs and landings over sea. The 19 crew members escaped by lifeboat and were then rescued by a nearby small size tanker. The 19 crew members suffered nothing life threatening but 4 suffered light injury such as bruises.

 

The US2 floatplane has the ability to take off and land in bad weather conditions with waves at around 3 meters in height. Up until now, there has been no accident before.

 

The JMSDF is creating an investigation committee to investigate the cause of the accident.

 

 

It's to be seen if this will hurt its deal potential with India and else where.


Edited by JasonJ, 30 April 2015 - 1107 AM.

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#2 rmgill

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 1459 PM

They've been operating these for a while. So, one incident seems odd for hurting such sales...


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#3 rmgill

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 1459 PM


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#4 JasonJ

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 1518 PM

It entered service in 2007 making 8 years now. That's fairly long, at least for the first one. The other three came into service 1 by 1 in later years. Totaling only 4, but now back down to 3. And with an engine falling off, maybe the structure is not as sturdy as it should be, unless a major failure occurred during maintenance like not properly screwing back on the engine after service. But I hope you're right :)
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#5 rmgill

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 1529 PM

4 Built since 2008? Are they building them by hand with Japanese Living Treasure Aircraft mechanics trained by the Mitsubishi shop folks from WWII?

I figured they'd have built more by now to replace the PS/US-1s from the '60s and afterwards. 


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#6 rmgill

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 1535 PM

For long range maritime patrol, the ability to actually land your maritime patrol craft on the water to effect rescues or other tasks has to be a useful capability. Obviously you're not going to be landing in a bad storm but some situations where an aircraft can actually pickup survivors rather than dropping survival packages is better. 

Here's a US-1 going through training evolutions. Looks like they carry a rescue swimmer or two. 



Thinkinga bout this, I'd like to see the USCG operate a few of these instead of Hercs. 


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#7 Colin

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 1544 PM

I have a very good book written by a USCG pilot that started on flying boats and then helo's. Helo's took over most of the duties of flying boats, mind you that semi-hopeless helo they have now might be a good argument to go back to them.


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#8 JasonJ

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Posted 30 April 2015 - 1551 PM

They look like neat and handy aircraft. Doesn't look like any more of them are on order for the JMSDF either. Maybe 1 will be ordered to replace the broken one.
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#9 rmgill

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Posted 01 May 2015 - 0111 AM

Thinking about them, they seem ideal for the Philippine islands, Canada in the north during summer time too. Possibly even Europe and the Greek islands. 

Such a craft can also work as a water bomber. I wonder how they'd do with an oil rig fire and a tank load of fire suppressant. 


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#10 JasonJ

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Posted 01 May 2015 - 0151 AM

Thinking about them, they seem ideal for the Philippine islands, Canada in the north during summer time too. Possibly even Europe and the Greek islands. 
Such a craft can also work as a water bomber. I wonder how they'd do with an oil rig fire and a tank load of fire suppressant.


Yea, going by the Japanese wiki, there is interest to sell it as a civilian version mentioning roles such as fire fighting. It couldn't be sold as a civilian version because of laws restricting the sale of military equipment and the US2 originally being military. Another prohibitive reason is cost, it's very expensive. But it says that their investigating civilian versions now. There is a civilian passenger model that has accommodation for 38 passengers along with luggage space, restroom, etc.

For the military version, in addition to India, Indonesia has expressed interest in it this year in March.

Edited by JasonJ, 01 May 2015 - 0152 AM.

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#11 RETAC21

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Posted 01 May 2015 - 0331 AM

Problem with flying boats is that the average rescue is performed in seas that won't allow the landing/take-off of the aircraft. A rescue version of the Osprey is a better choice.


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#12 JasonJ

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Posted 02 May 2015 - 0916 AM

This report says that the engine that fell off was on the right wing. It also says the balancing float on the right wing also ripped off.

https://www.chugoku-...category_id=256

 

This report says that midday on May 1st, the whole aircraft sank and is now 300 meters on the seafloor. The JMSDF is now considering working with a salvage company to raise the aircraft from the sea. According to Iwakuni Air Station, the floating aircraft was tied by rope to a barge in order to keep it from sinking but the rope gave way and thus, the aircraft sank.. It also says 5 people (not 4 in earlier reports) suffered light injury.

http://mainichi.jp/s...040075000c.html

 

This report speculates that perhaps, the balancing float was hit by a something large like a whale during take off causing the right wing to sink into the water thus causing one of the engines to get blown off from going below the sea surface. Although that would mean that the engine that fell off would have to be the outer engine on the right wing. The report says this is speculation based on a lack of details.

http://bylines.news....50501-00045336/


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#13 JasonJ

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 1209 PM

Operations for raising up the US-2 that had an accident has just been completed. The boat plane sank 300 meters down to the seabed. The main section raised up is the center fuselage which includes a flight recorder and will be analyzed. Raising operations started on June 14th and the raised parts have been unloaded to JMSDF Iwakuni Air Base on the 19th. The base has 5 US-2s and 2 US-1As but the US-2 have not been in operation since the accident. The raising operation cost 175,000,000 yen or about 1.5 million US$. There are plans to raise other parts, such as the front fuselage part, that are still left at the bottom of sea.

http://www.yomiuri.c...OYT1T50092.html

Edited by JasonJ, 22 June 2015 - 1221 PM.

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#14 JasonJ

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 1253 PM

On July 9th, one US-2 resumed flight training, flying for 1 hour around the JMSDF Iwakuni base.

The cause of the earlier accident is still under investigation but on July 6th the base's Chief Staff Officer told reporters that no abnormalities have been found in the recovered fuselage and equipment. And that they will aim to restore crew skill.

4 US-2s are stationed at the base excluding the 1 that had the accident but for the time being, just one aircraft will be flown to improve the proficiency of the pilots. They will advance the training in stages from landing and takeoff at base, to in Iwakuni bay, and to the outer waters. The number of aircraft will be increased. It is hoped that missions can resume after about 5 months.

The accident occurred over water in Ashizurimisaki bay in Kouchi prefecture on April 28th. Of the 19 crew members, 5 sustained light injury. The JGSDF accident investigation committee is analyzing the recovered flight recorder and investigating the cause. So far, it is known that 1 of the 4 engines was submerged in a wave and the remaining 3 engines failed in getting the aircraft to take off.

http://sp.mainichi.j...040412000c.html (Japanese article)

Edited by JasonJ, 17 July 2015 - 1256 PM.

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#15 Colin

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 1505 PM

Sounds like a wave hit the one engine, perhaps after the wing float ripped off?


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#16 JasonJ

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Posted 17 July 2015 - 1906 PM

Sounds like a wave hit the one engine, perhaps after the wing float ripped off?


Maybe. Like maybe the wing ripped off as the float being hit by something caused the wing to break.
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#17 JasonJ

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Posted 20 November 2015 - 1214 PM

Iwakuni base reported on November 13th the results of an investigation into the cause of the US-2 floatplane accident offshore of Kouchi Prefecture with 5 injured crew in April which was an error by the flight captain's piloting.

According to the base, the aircraft was submerged by a wave during take off and landing training at sea and one of the four engines stopped. With only 3 working engines, the pilot resumed to take off but the nose of the aircraft fell too far causing the whole aircraft to lose balance, crashing into the sea. Since there is no concrete procedure for taking off with only 3 engines and no clear standard for aborting takeoffs from water, the piloting manual will be reviewed.


http://www.yomiuri.c...OYS1T50009.html

Edited by JasonJ, 20 November 2015 - 1220 PM.

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#18 JasonJ

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Posted 01 December 2015 - 2343 PM

This December, India and Japan are expected to sign new defense agreements about the transfer of Japanese military tech to a India. It's being speculated that the US-2 floatplane negotiations might finally be concluded as part of the deal.

http://thediplomat.c...e-the-new-year/
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#19 JasonJ

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Posted 04 February 2016 - 0915 AM

India Navy plans to buy a first batch of six US-2s between 2017 and 2022. 6 more afterwards.  ShinMaywa offers to build them in India. Still a long ways out but seems more of for sure that the purchase will eventually happen.

 

NEW DELHI (PTI): Japan's ShinMaywa Industries, the manufacturer of US-2 amphibious aircraft that India is eyeing, is betting big on the 'Make in India' initiative and has offered to set up a plant here to cater to international demands.

The move comes as the Navy plans to procure six such aircraft, under a government-to-government deal, between 2017 and 2022. Six are proposed to be bought in the next phase.

"The deal when inked will have a 30 per cent offset clause. Under this offset clause, ShinMaywa wants to set up a plant in India to cater to the global market since the demand for the aircraft is high," defence sources said.

The project has been in the works since 2011 but got a renewed push following Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit to Japan in 2014 and a return trip by Japanese PM Shinzo Abe to New Delhi last December.

Sources said the deal could be a "government-to-government" exercise with the initial purchase being off-the-shelf.

"It is not simple to start manufacturing here. There has to be the necessary infrastructure and expertise," sources said.

If the deal goes through, it would be the first major export of Japanese defence item after it lifted decades-long self-imposed embargo on export of weapons.

The aircraft, which can land on choppy waters and have long-range civilian and military applications, are being sought by the Navy to monitor India's vast coastline, islands and for use in disaster relief.

Sources said that for the Indian Navy, the next priority project is the P-75 India, under which it plans to build six conventional submarines.

Also on priority are six nuclear-powered submarines for which the Cabinet Committee on Security had given the go ahead last February.

"P75I and nuclear submarines are the main focus right now besides the development of next indigenous aircraft carrier," sources said.

Amphibian aircraft can take off and land on both land and water. Seven of these aircraft are operated as Search and Rescue Amphibians by Japanese military.

Including its predecessor US-1, the amphibians have been dispatched over 900 times to rescue victims of maritime accidents.

A ShinMaywa representative said it has not tied up with any Indian firm for the project but has been in talks with several of them since 2011.

 

http://brahmand.com/...14565/1/10.html

 

 

 

Also Japan's 2016 defense budget includes one US-2 aircraft. Maybe as a replacement for the one that had the accident.

http://www.mod.go.jp.../2016/yosan.pdf


Edited by JasonJ, 04 February 2016 - 0916 AM.

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#20 JasonJ

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Posted 09 April 2016 - 0303 AM

Raw close look at US-2 aircraft operation including engine start-up, take-off, flight, landing on and take-off from sea, landing at base, and some activities after returning to base.

 


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