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#21 JasonJ

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 0642 AM

Chinese version of Roman.

https://defence.pk/p...3#post-10351552


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#22 Panzermann

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 1012 AM

Chinese version of Roman.

https://defence.pk/p...3#post-10351552

 

Ah, no. The relation between ukraine and russia is quite different to the japanese-chinese history. that kiss of dragon guy gets his facts so wrong it hurts. And he probably does not get the irony using the logo of a video game Made in Japan as his avatar.

 

 

Claiming that japanese are han because they use character taken over from china is so dumb. If a character means same in both languages it is pure happenstance. following that logic, we are all ancient romans, because we write with their alpahbet.


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#23 JasonJ

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Posted 24 March 2018 - 2045 PM

 

Chinese version of Roman.

https://defence.pk/p...3#post-10351552

 

Ah, no. The relation between ukraine and russia is quite different to the japanese-chinese history. that kiss of dragon guy gets his facts so wrong it hurts. And he probably does not get the irony using the logo of a video game Made in Japan as his avatar.

 

 

Claiming that japanese are han because they use character taken over from china is so dumb. If a character means same in both languages it is pure happenstance. following that logic, we are all ancient romans, because we write with their alpahbet.

 

 

What's the same is not the on the surface arguments. It's the underlying motive. It's not a matter of getting facts wrong. It's a matter to intentionally use a bag of tricks for the purpose of changing the minds of the masses in order to make a task easier to accomplish. Of course other's do this too. US media stations do this and it probably traces its roots back to 1920s. Well depending on the scope one wants to use for the concept, the timeline and number of examples expands or contracts. But a critical pint is the degree and frequency of pulling out the tricks from that bag for the purpose of engineering new narratives and "facts" of history. Tricks that include overwhelming important details in a mass of unrelated information, saying a false statement enough times so that a "monkey see monkey believe" effect takes place, never present facts of the whole truth, and never give credit. There are probably more.. but on that last one, a number of common posters still try to give Russia some credit. Is it too hard to get any in return? Yes for any agenda. Without a reciprocation of credit then what happens is just the consumption of receiving some credit and using it as winning over some sympathy to keep on propelling the same old agenda. And when the giving of a little sympathy is combined with the self inflicting criticism of our own systems, it doubles as a positive build up for the history engineering agenda. So upon that, what happens is the reciprocation of giving no credit at all because whats the point in keep on giving some when never does any come back?

 

Look I said it before that it is important to not get carried with condemnation; http://www.tank-net.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=41491&page=39#entry1354296 But I also think it is important to not be too tolerant of it either because once it spreads to the masses, there's no stopping it. So pardon my hardening after seeing the same thing from the Chinese side. It is not just a matter of them getting their facts wrong. They are intentionally talking like that so as to break up the US-Japan alliance. Before that, they were all "Jap fail to recognize history, Japs are remilitarizing". Now they are in the meta of "US is evil, Japanese are like us, they are lap dog of evil US, they should be independent and kick US out. Bravo Duterte". It's all agenda driven. Most typical westerners do care about what is true and what is not true and do just get their facts wrong during their long path of discovering more and more about history, MSM, etc., with most of them developing a more refined and better understanding over time. These guys are not like that. They are purely agenda driven, and the more they are engaged, the better they get are pursuing the agenda. The Kiss of Dragon guy is probably about 5 years behind our favorite poster from Russia in terms of refineness in the agenda. The more he talks with people, it is not a matter of him changing his mind, but of him building up more and more tricks in his bag for the agenda. Well maybe some do change their minds upon realization that they have been acting as a conduit of an agenda. But still, people really need to take note in how nationalistic the PRC is and have less toleration for it. I reckon these types have been in high mode in places like Hong Kong, Taiwan, and ROK. Now they are getting into common English web sites.

 

Who knows, maybe I am over thinking it. But I do not think so. But perhaps only those that have gone through talking with agenda driven people for a number of times can perhaps see what I'm talking about.


Edited by JasonJ, 24 March 2018 - 2050 PM.

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#24 JasonJ

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 0853 AM

Some China articles about their evolving social credit system.
2017 June 20th
Spoiler
http://www.globaltim...t/1052634.shtml
 
2018 March 6th
Spoiler
http://www.xinhuanet...c_137020082.htm
 
2018 March 19th
Spoiler
http://www.xinhuanet...c_137050692.htm
 
2018 May 9th
Spoiler
http://www.globaltim...t/1101544.shtml
 
2018 June 6th
Spoiler
http://www.xinhuanet...c_137235486.htm
 
2018 July 3rd
Spoiler
http://www.xinhuanet...c_137298542.htm

Edited by JasonJ, 01 August 2018 - 0906 AM.

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#25 Paul G.

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 1029 AM

The lack of diversity must mean they are evil. Why are there no women of colour?


The lack of women is reflective of the culture.
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#26 Murph

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Posted 02 August 2018 - 0622 AM

LOL!  

The lack of diversity must mean they are evil. Why are there no women of colour?


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#27 JasonJ

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Posted 11 August 2018 - 0842 AM

Oops forgot to insert mandatory Japan bad post.


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#28 JasonJ

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 1920 PM

Chinese version of Roman.
https://defence.pk/p...3#post-10351552


He's still on the same game.
https://defence.pk/p...2#post-11178403
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#29 sunday

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 0630 AM

https://www.dailymai...JsvO0lql1kRxo7o


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#30 Murph

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Posted 19 February 2019 - 0634 AM

Ok that is just disgusting.


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#31 JasonJ

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Posted 15 March 2019 - 1841 PM

A report was made about the human rights violation situation in the US.

BEIJING, March 14 (Xinhua) -- China on Thursday published a report on human rights situation in the United States.

The report, titled "Human Rights Record of the United States in 2018," was released by the Information Office of the State Council in response to the 2018 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices issued by the U.S. State Department on March 13, local time.

China's report said the United States government, a self-styled "human rights defender," has a human rights record which is flawed and lackluster, and the double standards of human rights it pursues are obvious.

With a foreword and eight chapters, the 12,000-character report exposes the human rights violations in the United States of different areas: the severe infringement on citizens' civil rights, the prevalence of money politics, the rising income inequality, worsening racial discrimination, and growing threats against children, women and immigrants, as well as the human rights violations caused by the unilateral America First policies.

A 10,000-character Chronology of Human Rights Violations of the United States in 2018 was also released by the office Thursday.

http://www.xinhuanet...c_137894457.htm
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#32 JasonJ

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Posted 11 May 2019 - 0640 AM


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#33 DougRichards

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Posted 11 May 2019 - 0749 AM

 

Ok that is just disgusting.

 

 

The west was not always innocent:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mummia


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#34 JasonJ

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 0815 AM

Cat fight - Liu Xin vs Trish Regan

 


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#35 JasonJ

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Posted 25 May 2019 - 0543 AM

Liu Xin has been a busy at CCTV. Here's a recent TV interview she hosted. Talking about how China is a stay at home power and such.

 

The westerner she's talking with has been a big Pro-China person for a long time. I once posted one of his long talks (a 2012 talk) in Australia about the wonderful raise of China on TN over 3 years ago. Among all the blah blah, at 1:03:31, it sums up to:

 

"Now I will say to you, you are fantastically privileged.. you are incredibly privileged because you are the pioneer western country as we move into a completely new historical era in which the West is no longer dominant, Asia is dominant, and above all, China is dominant. And you are at the cutting edge of that process. And you, falls on you, to work out and think through what historically that is going to mean for Australia. For your sense of identity. What who you are..." etc

http://www.tank-net....30813&p=1223738


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#36 BansheeOne

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 0511 AM

I was deliberating between the "Peaceful Rise of China", "Because Germany" or German refugee thread, but it's probably best posted here.

 

Chinese officials tell Germany to stay out of Hong Kong affairs after wanted activists gain refugee status

 
24 May 2019 12:59 Holmes Chan

 

China’s foreign ministry has called on Germany to “respect Hong Kong’s rule of law and independent judiciary” after the country granted refugee status to two wanted pro-independence activists.

 

Ray Wong and Alan Li, who were leading members of the pro-independence group Hong Kong Indigenous, faced rioting charges related to the 2016 Mong Kok unrest. They fled the city in November 2017 ahead of their trials, and were granted refugee status in Germany last May.

 

The office of the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) in Hong Kong issued a statement on Thursday expressing concern: “We call on [Germany] to uphold international laws and the basic principles of international relations, and respect the rule of law and independent judiciary of Hong Kong.”

 

“It must not tolerate criminals and must not interfere in Hong Kong and China’s internal affairs.”

 

The statement was echoed in Beijing by MFA spokesperson Lu Kang, who added that Hongkongers’ rights and freedoms are protected by law, and the One Country, Two Systems principle has been fully implemented since the 1997 Handover.

 

Chief Executive Carrie Lam has not yet responded to the incident yet, though she has reportedly cancelled an official trip to Germany originally scheduled for late June.

When pressed for answers, her security and justice ministers did not say whether Hong Kong would seek to extradite Wong and Li.

 

‘Gradual erosion of freedom’

 

The German foreign ministry said on Wednesday that it was “increasingly concerned about the diminishing space for the political opposition and a gradual erosion of freedom of opinion and the press, particularly in connection with sensitive political issues.”

 

However, the ministry also said the human rights situation in the city was “good as a whole,” and did not refer specifically to Wong and Li’s cases.

 

The Financial Times reported on Friday that Chinese diplomats in Germany had tried to “directly intervene” to prevent the duo from being granted asylum. In return, Berlin refused to share information with Beijing about the pair’s asylum applications.

 

‘They are fugitives’

 

Pro-Beijing lawmakers have ramped up their criticism of Germany, saying that the country was “misled” to believe the two men were refugees.

 

The Federation of Trade Unions (FTU) led around 20 people in a protest at the German consulate, with FTU lawmaker Michael Luk handing a letter to Deputy Consul-General David Schmidt.

 

“Please respect our justice system. [Li and Wong]… are not refugees, they are fugitives, because they are involved in the riot in 2016. It made many people injured, we have many many factual evidence [sic],” Luk said.

 

The duo are set to appear at a commemorative event for the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, which will be held at the German parliament on June 4.

 

Wong told the foreign press that he has softened his political stance and no longer advocated Hong Kong independence, instead he wanted to draw attention to the human rights situation in the city.

 

“There are now too many uncertainties for the Hong Kong independence movement. The suppression is too strong,” he told the Financial Times.

 

https://www.hongkong...refugee-status/


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#37 JasonJ

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Posted 26 May 2019 - 0532 AM

This thread is best because its the shortest of the mentioned :D

 

There's also this:

Adrian Zenz is a researcher at the European School of Culture and Theology in Korntal, Germany. Last year, he played a pivotal role in documenting the massive expansion of detention facilities in China’s Xinjiang region — what the government calls “vocational training centers,” but which function as political indoctrination camps. Zenz’s groundbreaking research estimating that as many as 1 million Muslims had disappeared into the facilities was published in the Jamestown China Brief, and then in the peer-reviewed journal Central Asian Survey.

Today, at the 40th Human Rights Council in Geneva, Zenz defended an updated estimate on just how far the mass internment campaign has gone. Reuters has the report: 1.5 million Muslims could be detained in China’s Xinjiang: academic.

Adrian Zenz, an independent German researcher, said that his new estimate was based on satellite images, public spending on detention facilities and witness accounts of overcrowded facilities and missing family members.

“Although it is speculative it seems appropriate to estimate that up to 1.5 million ethnic minorities — equivalent to just under 1 in 6 adult members of a predominantly Muslim minority group in Xinjiang — are or have been interned in any of these detention, internment and re-education facilities, excluding formal prisons,” Zenz said at an event organized by the U.S. mission in Geneva, home of United Nations human rights bodies.

“The Chinese state’s present attempt to eradicate independent and free expressions of the distinct ethnic and religious identities in Xinjiang is nothing less than a systematic campaign of cultural genocide and should be treated as such,” Zenz added.

The U.S. Department of State is also issuing statements about Xinjiang that are far more specific and condemn the human rights abuses in much stronger terms than anything in 2018. Reuters reports:

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo highlighted abuses in Iran, South Sudan, Nicaragua and China in the department’s annual “Country Reports on Human Rights Practices,” but told reporters that China was “in a league of its own when it comes to human rights violations.”

“For me, you haven’t seen things like this since the 1930s,” Michael Kozak, the head of the State Department’s human rights and democracy bureau, told the same briefing, referring to abuses of China’s Muslim minority in the Xinjiang region.

“Rounding up, in some estimations…in the millions of people, putting them into camps, and torturing them, abusing them, and trying to basically erase their culture and their religion and so on from their DNA. It’s just remarkably awful.”

“It is one of the most serious human rights violations in the world today,” he said.

Beijing has been on the defensive in recent months, and most recently defended the Muslim detention camps as being “like boarding schools,” though the chairman of the Xinjiang government, Shohrat Zakir, declined to disclose how many are in the system. The government has also been inviting waves of foreign diplomats, mostly from non-Western countries, on carefully organized tours of Xinjiang.

Two more notes:

As Adrian Zenz says on his Twitter feed — which you should keep an eye on for updates on this story — the British and German governments have added to calls for UN access to Xinjiang to conduct an independent assessment of alleged human rights abuses.
United Nations human rights chief Michelle Bachelet said on March 6 that her office continues to seek access to Xinjiang “to carry out an independent assessment of the continuing reports pointing to wide patterns of enforced disappearances and arbitrary detentions.” She has been seeking access for over three months now, after initially announcing that her office had been seeking access on December 5, 2018.
https://supchina.com...-camps-scholar/
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#38 JasonJ

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Posted 09 June 2019 - 2257 PM

100s of thousands of people protesting in the streets of Hong Kong right now.
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#39 JasonJ

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 0958 AM

Number of demonstrators have reached over 1 million. For a little place like Hong Kong, that's massive.

 

 

HONG KONG -- Just days after an estimated 1 million people took to the streets in Hong Kong to demonstrate against a proposed extradition law that would allow suspects to be handed over to mainland Chinese authorities for prosecution, attention now turns to the city's Legislative Council, or Legco, which resumes debate on the bill on Wednesday. Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam on Monday said that the government will continue to push for the bill's passage without delay, and a vote is scheduled for next week.

While the Hong Kong government maintains the bill aims to plug a legal loophole, many fear that the proposed amendments could undermine the city's autonomy and damage the financial hub's competitiveness. The proposed law also has drawn international attention, with some foreign governments openly expressing concern over the potential erosion to the city's rule of law, which makes Hong Kong a magnet for multinational companies.

Many small businesses, including dentist offices, restaurants and book stores, have said they will not open on Wednesday in a show of support against the bill, and some labor unions are calling for strikes, local media reported. On Tuesday, Lam warned against "radical actions" by businesses, and by teachers and students who plan to boycott classes, public broadcaster RTHK reported.

As Legco continues to debate the extradition bill, here are five things you need to know about the controversial proposal.

What is the bill?

In February, the Hong Kong government revived a motion shelved some 20 years ago to amend its extradition law. The move will allow fugitives in the city to be transferred to jurisdictions beyond the 20 countries with which Hong Kong already has extradition treaties. Hong Kong currently does not have an extradition treaty with mainland China.

The move was prompted by a recent legal dilemma, in which the government was not able to transfer a Hong Kong man accused of killing his pregnant girlfriend in Taiwan for trial because the two governments do not have an extradition treaty. The suspect was sentenced to 29 months in prison in Hong Kong for the lesser offense of money laundering, and he could be released as early as October.

The Hong Kong government said the legal loophole needs to be closed to uphold justice and align the city's laws with international standards. But the law would also pave the way for fugitives to be sent to mainland China, where many legal experts believe suspects will not receive a fair trial given the Communist Party's control over the courts and prosecutions.

Why is the bill controversial?

The proposed legislation has sparked strong opposition among pan-democratic political parties, business groups, legal experts, religious organizations and ordinary citizens. They argue that allowing fugitives in Hong Kong -- or people passing through the city -- to be extradited to China will damage the city's reputation as a financial hub that is safeguarded by an independent judiciary system, something mainland China lacks. Hong Kong's high-degree of autonomy was guaranteed under the "one country, two systems" legal framework when it was handed over to China from Britain in 1997.

The extradition bill also comes at a particularly sensitive time, as China's government has been exerting its influence over Hong Kong and publicly criticizing anti-government and pro-democracy rallies. The city's authorities also have taken a strong hand against political activism.

The little public consultation on the proposed bill and what many perceive to be the hurried manner of its passage has prompted many to call for a comprehensive review of the extradition law and to include additional safeguards.

 

What is the reaction in the business community in Hong Kong and among foreign governments?

The American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong has called on the government to drop or delay the bill, as its passage would come at the expense of the city's business community. "It would be irresponsible for the government to just brush this off," Tara Joseph, president of the chamber, told Nikkei. Australian Chamber of Commerce Chairman Andrew Macintosh said this week that the bill could cost Hong Kong's reputation as a stable international business center.

The bill also drew rare open criticism from pro-Beijing business groups. The response has prompted the government to make concessions on the bill, including dropping some white-collar crimes from the list of offenses that would make suspects eligible for extradition.

U.S. State Department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus said this week that the proposed amendment puts at risk the city's long-established special status in international affairs, and will negatively impact Hong Kong's protection of human rights and democratic values. Under the United States-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992, Washington treats Hong Kong as an entity distinct from mainland China in matters of trade and economic systems. Hong Kong's economy could suffer if the policy is rescinded.

British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt and Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland also recently have expressed their concerns over the erosion of the city's freedoms.

Does China have any direct involvement in the legislation?

It is not known whether the move to enact the law comes under direct influence from authorities in Beijing. But several high-profile officials, including Chinese Vice Premier Han Zheng, who is a member of the powerful seven-member Politburo Standing Committee of the Communist Party, have openly voiced their support for the extradition bill.

Following Sunday's demonstration, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said that Beijing will continue to support the Hong Kong government in advancing the amendment. He also condemned what he described as "irresponsible remarks" made by some foreign countries on the issue.

What happens next?

The bill, which begins its second reading, or debate, in Legco on Wednesday, needs to go through three reading sessions in the chamber before it advances to a vote, which is scheduled for June 20. To become law, the bill will need to secure a simple majority, or 35 votes from 69 lawmakers.

While it is unclear how Legco members will vote, the pro-establishment camp, including pro-business lawmakers, currently holds more than 40 seats.

https://asia.nikkei....extradition-law


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#40 JasonJ

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Posted 11 June 2019 - 1002 AM

HK2019.jpg

 

Tomorrow might be a big day.

 

Over a hundred Hong Kong employers from across industry sectors have pledged to either suspend business or support employees who choose to strike on Wednesday against a controversial extradition bill.

The walkout comes after a mass rally on Sunday that organisers said drew around 1.03 million people to the streets over the government’s planned amendments to its rendition laws. Police said 240,000 attended at the protest’s peak. Chief Executive Carrie Lam refused to back down on proposals the next day, prompting calls for further protests and industrial action.

Those who have decided to suspend business on Wednesday to oppose the extradition bill include Craft Coffee Roaster, transportation service CALL4VAN, retailer AbouThai – which said it will close all 13 of its stores – and NGO Life Workshop, in a move that aims to hit the core of the bustling financial hub.

Jimmy Sham, convenor of the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF) which organised Sunday’s march, said that he is pleased to hear about the labour strike, although the group did not explicitly call for such an action. He added that CHRF will host rallies every day until the Legislative Council debates the extradition bill.

Hong Kong’s government first proposed legal amendments in February to allow the city to handle case-by-case extradition requests from jurisdictions with no prior agreements, most notably China and Taiwan. The plan would enable the chief executive and local courts to handle extradition requests without legislative oversight. The bill could pass before July, with democrats, lawyers, journalists, foreign politicians and businesses raising concerns over the risk of residents being extradited to the mainland.

‘Radical action’

Chief Executive Carrie Lam warned against “radical action” on Tuesday morning.

“No civilised society would want to see young people pushed to commit radical action for such an important legal and policy issue,” she said. “I urge schools, parents, organisations, enterprises, unions to consider carefully – what good does it do for Hong Kong society, and our young people, by calling for such radical action?”

Lam was also referencing an episode late on Sunday when the largely peaceful rally turned violent as police tried to move protesters from around the legislative complex.

‘Refusing to back down’

The pro-democracy Civic Party on Monday called for a general strike and for people to attend a rally organised by CHRF on Wednesday.

Bleak House Books, an independent bookshop participating in the strike, said their employees stand in solidarity with other businesses who plan to strike: “Ah that pesky Hong Kong spirit is rearing its ugly head again. Refusing to back down in the face of adversity,” their statement read.

Pro-democracy lawmaker Claudia Mo said at a CHRF press conference on Monday that the group were not urging people to risk their jobs when deciding to strike: “We’re not specifically making a call on anyone to just ignore his or her job. All we’re saying is that we wish Hong Kong people will do whatever they think appropriate, including calling in an ‘unavailability for job’ on Wednesday. Free will, free mind, after all,” she said.

Additionally, pro-democracy lawmaker Fernando Cheung said he is calling for social welfare sector workers to come out on Wednesday to stop the “terrible, draconian law.”

“We take the wellbeing of our users, many of them are in the vulnerable groups, as the first consideration. We would not want to adversely affect the wellbeing of those who we serve in the welfare sector.”

https://www.hongkong...radical-action/


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