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Health Quackery Roundup


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#361 JWB

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 1052 AM

 

RADFORD, Va. - A Radford man who operates a 'holistic and alternative health service' is facing dozens of charges for practicing without a license. 

Martin Riding, 66, was arrested Monday on 64 direct indictments handed down by a grand jury.

Officials say the charges stem from incidents involving multiple victims from December 2016 to February 2019. 

https://www.wsls.com...without-license


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#362 JWB

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Posted 13 August 2019 - 1110 AM

Not quackery but an example of capitalist medicine in action:

Ebola no longer ‘incurable,’ scientists say, after discovery of two highly effective drugs

 

Two experimental Ebola treatments significantly increase survival rates for those infected with a disease often considered a death sentence, scientists announced Monday, providing fresh hope for containing an outbreak that has ravaged eastern Congo.

The drugs, tested in a nearly nine-month clinical trial, have performed so well that health professionals will now administer them to every patient in Congo.

“It’s the first example that a therapeutic intervention can have a dramatic effect on decreasing the mortality of the Ebola virus disease,” Anthony S. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in an interview.

Jean-Jacques Muyembe Tamfum, a Congolese doctor who has spent his career researching Ebola treatments and oversaw the trial on the ground, said in a conference call Monday that he “could not have imagined” that such a day would come.

 

“From now on, we will no longer say that Ebola is incurable,” he said.

But in a place where suspicion of health workers and violent conflict are widespread, finding effective medical therapies is only half the battle, experts say.    The two antibody-based treatments, REGN-EB3 and mAb-114, work by blocking a critical protein in the Ebola virus. Patients receive them once, intravenously, and “ideally, as soon as possible” after infection, Fauci said.

They saved about 90 percent of patients with low levels of infection, according to preliminary data released from the trial. Across all levels of infection, patients who received REGN-EB3 had a mortality rate of 29 percent, while those treated with mAb-114 had a mortality rate of 34 percent. The average mortality rate for Ebola has been about 50 percent, according to the WHO.  

https://www.washingt...dc5d_story.html


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#363 Panzermann

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 0524 AM

Wasn't there a cure for ebola already, that had the limitation to not work properly in bodies with high melanin content? Good that there now is one that can help anyone.


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#364 Panzermann

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 0958 AM

So it is a wash?

Abstract
Objective To examine the associations of vegetarianism with risks of ischaemic heart disease and stroke.
 
Design Prospective cohort study.
 
Setting The EPIC-Oxford study, a cohort in the United Kingdom with a large proportion of non-meat eaters, recruited across the country between 1993 and 2001.
 
Participants 48 188 participants with no history of ischaemic heart disease, stroke, or angina (or cardiovascular disease) were classified into three distinct diet groups: meat eaters (participants who consumed meat, regardless of whether they consumed fish, dairy, or eggs; n=24 428), fish eaters (consumed fish but no meat; n=7506), and vegetarians including vegans (n=16 254), based on dietary information collected at baseline, and subsequently around 2010 (n=28 364).
 
Main outcome measures Incident cases of ischaemic heart disease and stroke (including ischaemic and haemorrhagic types) identified through record linkage until 2016.
 
Results Over 18.1 years of follow-up, 2820 cases of ischaemic heart disease and 1072 cases of total stroke (519 ischaemic stroke and 300 haemorrhagic stroke) were recorded. After adjusting for sociodemographic and lifestyle confounders, fish eaters and vegetarians had 13% (hazard ratio 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.77 to 0.99) and 22% (0.78, 0.70 to 0.87) lower rates of ischaemic heart disease than meat eaters, respectively (P<0.001 for heterogeneity). This difference was equivalent to 10 fewer cases of ischaemic heart disease (95% confidence interval 6.7 to 13.1 fewer) in vegetarians than in meat eaters per 1000 population over 10 years. The associations for ischaemic heart disease were partly attenuated after adjustment for self reported high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, and body mass index (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 1.00 in vegetarians with all adjustments). By contrast, vegetarians had 20% higher rates of total stroke (hazard ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.40) than meat eaters, equivalent to three more cases of total stroke (95% confidence interval 0.8 to 5.4 more) per 1000 population over 10 years, mostly due to a higher rate of haemorrhagic stroke. The associations for stroke did not attenuate after further adjustment of disease risk factors.
 
Conclusions In this prospective cohort in the UK, fish eaters and vegetarians had lower rates of ischaemic heart disease than meat eaters, although vegetarians had higher rates of haemorrhagic and total stroke.
​


https://www.bmj.com/...t/366/bmj.l4897
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#365 bojan

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 1041 AM

I would very much prefer heart attack than being a vegetable after a stroke.


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#366 Stargrunt6

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 1741 PM

Increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke probably due to lack of some micronutrient I bet. Can't be vitamin k.
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#367 JWB

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 1023 AM

Increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke probably due to lack of some micronutrient I bet. Can't be vitamin k.

B-12?


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#368 Stargrunt6

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 1045 AM

maybe. Or omega 3's. there are like 8-10 micronutrients you need tp supplement when going vegan or vegetarian
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#369 rmgill

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 1227 PM

Not to mention fats for the brain health.
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#370 Stargrunt6

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 1744 PM

Well, omega 3s are fats but yeah.
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#371 Rick

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 1836 PM

Not to mention fats for the brain health.

If that's the case, then I should be close to Albert Einstein  :D


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#372 Ivanhoe

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Posted 13 September 2019 - 2209 PM

Well, omega 3s are fats but yeah.

 

Can't help but wonder if many of these "Food X linked to higher/lower cholesterol/MI/Alzheimers/whatever" tales are mostly statistical noise due to lack of controls in observational vs clinical.

 

I.e. "health nuts" having health issues because they eradicated good things (like necessary fats) along with bad things. When I was reading up on hypertension and heart disease, there were articles talking about folks going on a low-sodium diet which resulted in a near-zero potassium intake, with tragic consequences.


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#373 Rick

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 0153 AM

Don't get sick.

 

https://www.wsj.com/...uns-11568325291


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#374 Skywalkre

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 1858 PM

 

Well, omega 3s are fats but yeah.

 

Can't help but wonder if many of these "Food X linked to higher/lower cholesterol/MI/Alzheimers/whatever" tales are mostly statistical noise due to lack of controls in observational vs clinical.

 

I.e. "health nuts" having health issues because they eradicated good things (like necessary fats) along with bad things. When I was reading up on hypertension and heart disease, there were articles talking about folks going on a low-sodium diet which resulted in a near-zero potassium intake, with tragic consequences.

 

 

To the first point - seems like that's a strong possibility.  A lot of the docs I read lament the quality of a lot of these studies.  So many are simply self-reported which has a host of issues associated with it. 

 

On top of that even if what they're reporting is true there's usually more to the story.  A while ago there was the big news that eating red meat was associated with a higher risk of cancer.  It turns out it was something like a 1% chance raised to a 1.5%.  Don't quote me on those figures but the point was a significant increase over nothing is still nothing.  Given the nature of our 24h news cycle and the desperation of these channels/sites to drive up viewers/clicks that study was reported like eating red meat was suicidal.  Furthermore the folks I follow point out a lot of what the study participants were reporting was meat that even proponents of red meat don't recommend.  :blink:

 

To your last point - something I've noticed in all my reading in recent years is that there is very little out there that is 100% good for you no matter how you eat it or in what quantities.  There's almost always something in food that could be bad if you don't eat something else with it (whether to make up for deficiencies or counter/control something bad in it) or prepare it in an unhealthy way.  If someone says 'stay away from food X because it has Y in it' I tend to just ignore them as usually Y is something that's not bad if taken in low quantities or if you get enough of something else in your diet to counteract it (this, of course, assumes food X is something real and not some shelf-stable abomination sitting for months on your grocery store shelf).


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#375 Skywalkre

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 1912 PM

 

That article is frustrating on a couple levels.

 

For starters, as he points out, there is some good in what these folks are trying to push ("focus on eliminating health disparities and ensuring that the next generation of physicians is well-equipped to deal with cultural diversity").  Unfortunately what good there is is being drowned out in a lot of stupid.

 

Second, there is a good argument to be made that our medical system needs an overhaul.  It's just not what the folks the author is warning against are out to accomplish.  Take this paragraph from the article:

 

 

The traditional American model of medical training, which has been emulated around the world, emphasizes a scientific approach to treatment and subjects students to rigorous classroom instruction. Students didn’t encounter patients until they had some fundamental knowledge of disease processes and knew how to interpret symptoms. They were expected to appreciate medical advances and be able to incorporate them into their eventual fields of practice. Medical education was demanding and occasionally led to student failure, but it produced a technically proficient and responsible physician corps for the U.S.

 

There's nothing inherently wrong with what he's writing there.  Unfortunately that scientific approach to treatment, fundamental knowledge of disease processes, and the ability to interpret symptoms comes behind a methodology that focuses on so many conditions/diseases being treatable by a pill or procedure and completely ignore prevention or treatment through simply taking care of oneself (a figure I remember from a book a few years ago said something like the average MD in the US gets less than 6h of nutritional instruction... :huh:).


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#376 shep854

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 1913 PM

'The poison is in the dose'


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#377 Rick

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 0518 AM

 

 

That article is frustrating on a couple levels.

 

For starters, as he points out, there is some good in what these folks are trying to push ("focus on eliminating health disparities and ensuring that the next generation of physicians is well-equipped to deal with cultural diversity").  Unfortunately what good there is is being drowned out in a lot of stupid.

 

Second, there is a good argument to be made that our medical system needs an overhaul.  It's just not what the folks the author is warning against are out to accomplish.  Take this paragraph from the article:

 

 

The traditional American model of medical training, which has been emulated around the world, emphasizes a scientific approach to treatment and subjects students to rigorous classroom instruction. Students didn’t encounter patients until they had some fundamental knowledge of disease processes and knew how to interpret symptoms. They were expected to appreciate medical advances and be able to incorporate them into their eventual fields of practice. Medical education was demanding and occasionally led to student failure, but it produced a technically proficient and responsible physician corps for the U.S.

 

There's nothing inherently wrong with what he's writing there.  Unfortunately that scientific approach to treatment, fundamental knowledge of disease processes, and the ability to interpret symptoms comes behind a methodology that focuses on so many conditions/diseases being treatable by a pill or procedure and completely ignore prevention or treatment through simply taking care of oneself (a figure I remember from a book a few years ago said something like the average MD in the US gets less than 6h of nutritional instruction... :huh:).

 

The article is about medical school education. The gist of the article is that what is today described at "social justice" is infecting the medical education. The article is correct.

However, lets dissect your post:

" ("focus on eliminating health disparities and ensuring that the next generation of physicians is well-equipped to deal with cultural diversity").  Unfortunately what good there is is being drowned out in a lot of stupid.

Agree with your last sentence. Stupid is the political bs striving to infect medical knowledge. People are alot more alike on the inside than the outside, hence the emphasis on medical science. To your first sentence, what exactly are "health disparities?" The common knowledge of the detrimental  effects of tobacco, obesity, drug use, etc?  The lesser known, but very obvious example of negative mental health issues? These issues that are largely avoidable by personal choices and to be honest, personal responsibility.

"... focuses on so many conditions/diseases being treatable by a pill or procedure and completely ignore prevention or treatment through simply taking care of oneself." 

This would pertain to the personal choice made by the patient manifesting itself to the point that the "pill or procedure" is needed.  Obviously some aspects of health care is not attributable to personal choices, hence the scientific knowledge and skills that are needed to become a doctor. 


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#378 Stargrunt6

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 0640 AM

I've read that article.  Thankfully, that didn't happen at my school.

 

Lemme tell ya why learning all that is a problem . . . it wastes time that could be spent prepping for boards. Everything in med school bends the knee to Almighty Boards.

 

Every med student asks themselves "is it on boards?"  If not, it's not bothered with. 

 

I guarantee those SocJus classes are mandatory 1-3 hour lectures and have some BS quiz at the end that uses the in-class polling system.  I also bet you could flunk that quiz and you'll pass for showing up.  Heck, I guarantee classmates are doing others favors by mashing buttons on their remotes so they can skip.  

 

Another reason:  there's more stuff to learn yet med school is still 4 years and residency is 3.  So we're taking up time that is not directly relevant to pt care. 

 

But it's all moot anyway, the AI's are gonna take our jerbs ("jobs"). 

 

Side note: we did have our share of SJW types back at school.  Last time I checked, the Child-grooming, I mean, Vagina  Monologues are still being held there.  One greenie from California, who spoke of the LA riots as a revolution, harangued our dean to get recycling bins in our schools for all kinds, metal, paper, plastic, etc.  There would be like 5-6 garbage cans in the student lounge in front of the bookstore.  The place looked like a dump. New Dean comes in and he took all that down. 


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#379 Ivanhoe

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 1005 AM

For starters, as he points out, there is some good in what these folks are trying to push ("focus on eliminating health disparities and ensuring that the next generation of physicians is well-equipped to deal with cultural diversity").  Unfortunately what good there is is being drowned out in a lot of stupid.


As soon as the word "disparities" is used, my BS detector goes off.

As we've seen with the public education system* and justice system, they're going to demand equality of outcome. Which is impossible, unless the government successfully enforces equality of behavior.


* The Obama administration's demand for eliminating disparities in school discipline, for example.
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#380 Stargrunt6

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Posted 15 September 2019 - 1030 AM

Wanna fix health disparities? Create a mind control ray and program it to convince the lower classes to give up smoking and eating like shit.  

 

So many of my patients told me they quit taking their meds because they can't afford it.  Please, amlodipine and metformin are on the $4 list at walmart.  Lisinopril is FREE at Publix and other pharmacies in Georgia. But they don't mind picking up a pack of cigarettes (or more) per day. 


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