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Mint Vs Ubuntu Vs Fedora Vs Debian Vs Opensuse Vs Others


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#41 TTK Ciar

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 1139 AM

I really dont know, why systemd now gains support.


I wasn't kidding about udev. Systemd has taken over distributions through three main vectors:
  • Red Hat sponsors the project (the project lead, Lennart Poettering is a Red Hat employee), so they put it in Fedora and RHEL, which caused it to trickle down to all of the RHEL derivatives (CentOS, Oracle, Scientific Linux, etc).
  • There was a tremendous political effort to get it pushed into Debian, which caused it to trickle down to the Debian derivatives (significantly, Ubuntu and its myriad derivatives, including Mint).
  • Most distributions use udev to load device drivers, so when udev became dependent on systemd, a slew of "other" distributions picked it up.
The branches of Linux distributions are mapped out here, and as you can see Debian and Red Hat are two of the three main roots, accounting for most of the world's distributions: https://upload.wikim...on_Timeline.svg

(For some reason the Red Hat logo isn't showing up next to their root .. it's the one below Slackware, above the various independent lines.)

There are still seventy'ish distributions not adopting systemd, including the most popular Linux distribution in the world (Android). About half of those distributions have either taken positive steps to resist systemd (such as adopting eudev) or publicly announced an intention to remain systemd-free.

I keep some relevant links here for easy reference: http://ciar.org/ttk/...ic/systemd.html

Edited by TTK Ciar, 08 August 2017 - 1140 AM.

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#42 Panzermann

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 1850 PM

Wow. we are systemd. resistence is futile.

 

Yes lots of distros do not adopt it, but the main desktop distros are either redhat or debian based and thus they have taken most of the desktop which I use Linux for. Okay there are a NAS and my DSL router, but those two are cared for by their manufacturers. And so far I have been happy with the ease that debian is to make work. Click, install programme package. It runs. Well maybe I should look at SuSE again after nearly two decades. :unsure:

 

looking over your links the snobbish response to bugs in systemd are really not instilling trust in their competence.

 

 

 

Calling Android a Linux distribution is a bit of a stretch IMHO. The Linux serves mostly as the groundwork for running Java on top of it. And for this purpose they tailor the kernel and surrounding software to fit and thus can use whatever they want or need.


Edited by Panzermann, 08 August 2017 - 1853 PM.

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#43 TTK Ciar

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 2246 PM

Calling Android a Linux distribution is a bit of a stretch IMHO. The Linux serves mostly as the groundwork for running Java on top of it. And for this purpose they tailor the kernel and surrounding software to fit and thus can use whatever they want or need.


What you say is true, but if you install Master Terminal and explore your device from the command line, you'll see it has a lot in common with other Linux distributions as well.
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#44 Murph

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Posted 09 August 2017 - 0651 AM

Apparently early batch Ryzen chips have an issue with segfaults when running a specific benchmark.  AMD is aware of it, and is working on a fix.  Apparently Threadripper and Epyx are not affected by this chip bug.  


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#45 Murph

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Posted 21 September 2017 - 2103 PM

Suggestions for loading Mint Linux onto an old iMac 27" for a desktop?  My little linux laptop died in the hurricane, water blew through the window, and got into the laptop.  So I am without a linux machine right now.  Bummer.


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#46 Blunt Eversmoke

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 1115 AM

I am kinda ashamed to ask such a noob question, but here goes:

 

How do I protect a Linux installation (more specifically, the boot sector) when playing Windows 10 onto the same HD in the same box? How do I prevent Windows from shooting my boot sector to shit? Windows always thinks it is all that and the user won't need anything else and you cannot boot Linux after playing Windows onto a Linux box...

I always did it the way around and saw that Linux preserves the box' ability to launch Windows, but now I have no choice but to put Windows onto a Linux machine for my wife.


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#47 Rickard N

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 1425 PM

I've never done it but there a few ideas at the bottom of this page https://help.ubuntu....WindowsDualBoot

 

/R


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#48 Blunt Eversmoke

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 1447 PM

Thanks, I'll try the option for GRUB re-installation tomorrow. Sad thing there's no no-risk option.


Edited by Blunt Eversmoke, 12 October 2017 - 1448 PM.

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#49 Rickard N

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 1651 PM

There's not a no-risk installation where you install linux after windows either, that may very much screw things up too.

 

/R


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#50 TTK Ciar

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 0018 AM

You can mitigate the risk somewhat by installing Windows on a separate drive and then updating grub on the boot drive with the location of the Windows filesystem.
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#51 Ivanhoe

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 0753 AM

I am kinda ashamed to ask such a noob question, but here goes:

 

How do I protect a Linux installation (more specifically, the boot sector) when playing Windows 10 onto the same HD in the same box? How do I prevent Windows from shooting my boot sector to shit? Windows always thinks it is all that and the user won't need anything else and you cannot boot Linux after playing Windows onto a Linux box...

I always did it the way around and saw that Linux preserves the box' ability to launch Windows, but now I have no choice but to put Windows onto a Linux machine for my wife.

 

Keep in mind that dual-booting is now a fallback choice for most folks wanting to run two OSes on one box. The preferred choice, IMHO, is to run the secondary OS as a virtual machine. To wit:

 

1> do a clean install of Win10 onto the system drive;

2> install the WinXX version of the Oracle Virtualbox application;

3> download your preferred Linux installation ISO file to your Windows box;

4> create a Linux VM using VirtualBox.

 

Your wife can boot up into Win10 and be happy (after the day's 200MB update downloads and installs). You can boot up into Win10, launch VirtualBox, start your Linux VM, go full screen, and be happy.


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#52 CT96

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 1605 PM

I go the other way, linux as the host OS and windows as the Guest. Except that I hardly ever fire up my windows VM anymore.


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#53 Murph

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 1715 PM

It only wants to install the 32 bit versions....  I can't handle running 32 bit on my 64 bit machine.  So far it seems that on the Oracle forums the answer is "look for it, RTFM, and play around to see if you can get it to work".  Not helpful.  


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#54 CT96

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 1734 PM

For virtualization I use VMWare. It costs a noticeable amount, but they are an order of magnitude more complete a solution than any of their competitors. Of course, I also work with VMWare professionally and at great scale, so using it at home is the obvious choice for me.

 

 

Free means you pay for it with time. I would prefer to throw $200 at VMWare Workstation and be done.


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#55 Blunt Eversmoke

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 0521 AM

How much is the performance loss when running a VM compared to a "native" boot? (Just in case I decide to play some hardware-hungry games...)


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#56 Ivanhoe

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 0822 AM

It only wants to install the 32 bit versions....  I can't handle running 32 bit on my 64 bit machine.  So far it seems that on the Oracle forums the answer is "look for it, RTFM, and play around to see if you can get it to work".  Not helpful.  

 

That usually means that virtualization is disabled in the BIOS. Boot into the BIOS setup program, look under one of the tabs like "Advanced", and look for virtualization. Enable, reboot, and you probably will be able to create a VM with a 64-bit OS.


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#57 Ivanhoe

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 0831 AM

For virtualization I use VMWare. It costs a noticeable amount, but they are an order of magnitude more complete a solution than any of their competitors. Of course, I also work with VMWare professionally and at great scale, so using it at home is the obvious choice for me.

 

 

Free means you pay for it with time. I would prefer to throw $200 at VMWare Workstation and be done.

 

VirtualBox is pretty good for amateur/lab use. I guess my license for Workstation 10 is still valid, but I haven't messed with it for several years. I was gonna take an online VMware ICM class to renew my VCP, but having enrollment issues. I'm hoping that VMware Academy students still get a WS license.

 

Hyper-V, now that is a horse apple of a different color...


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#58 Ivanhoe

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 0833 AM

How much is the performance loss when running a VM compared to a "native" boot? (Just in case I decide to play some hardware-hungry games...)

 

Can't speak to gaming, but for regular number-crunching desktop virtualization is pretty smooth. I'm skeptical that the video pass-through will make you happy, though.


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#59 CT96

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 1005 AM

Gaming on a VM is very iffy. Depends highly on the game. I mostly play games that also have linux editions. I probably am going to build a Windows Gaming PC in the not too distant future (hahahaha, yeah, right, not with an infant sucking up all my free time and resources) so I can play the windows games too. But then my home computer setup is more complex than some workplace computer setups (how many homes are running rack-mounted ESX servers and network storage arrays, have DMZs, Jira, Confluence, and LDAP/AD domains?). 

 

I am *not* normal when it comes to computer use. Never have been.


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#60 Murph

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 1121 AM

Ok, I managed to get Virtual box to see Linux Mint 64.  I am attempting to get things up and running.  I am so glad I installed 32 gb of Ram in the machine.  I gave it 12 gb of RAM, so let's see how it works.  

 

Works fine, it just cannot see any USB drives.  


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