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An Oops Moment


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#1 MiloMorai

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 1058 AM

Happens about 1:24

https://youtu.be/vPFCSMNxmWY


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#2 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 1101 AM

Should shove it in reverse, always works with my RC Challenger 2. :P


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#3 Manic Moran

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 1216 PM

Related. 

 

They were fixing it well after the show closed.... (Idler tension arm collapsed)


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#4 wlewisiii

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 1322 PM

Actually saw one similar to that walked back on by going slowly in reverse and applying a bit of strategic tanker bar and sledge. That was an M-60A3 and they didn't want to break track on a hill at Hohenfels in the rain if they could avoid it.  


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#5 Tim Sielbeck

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 1348 PM

A tank in my platoon did the same at Hohenfels.  We took all the tension off of the track then threw a track block (which was an extra one hanging from the infantry rail) between the track and drive sprocket, twice.  It put the track back in place at the cost of a track block broken in half and required less than 20 minutes to do.


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#6 shep854

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 1500 PM

A tank in my platoon did the same at Hohenfels.  We took all the tension off of the track then threw a track block (which was an extra one hanging from the infantry rail) between the track and drive sprocket, twice.  It put the track back in place at the cost of a track block broken in half and required less than 20 minutes to do.

Nice when an improv works out.  When it doesn't... :unsure:


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#7 rmgill

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 1600 PM

Demonstrating track repair in the field is VERY nice of them! It's a full demo!

Thoughts that occur to me. 

Pimping hydraulic suspension on the ARV...

As far as removing end connectors, wouldn't a wedge be better for separating the end connectors than trying to hammer at that odd angle? 

Did anyone else keep expecting a Kaiju to walk over the far hillside? 
 


Edited by rmgill, 11 February 2019 - 1600 PM.

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#8 DKTanker

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 1804 PM

Demonstrating track repair in the field is VERY nice of them! It's a full demo!

Thoughts that occur to me. 

Pimping hydraulic suspension on the ARV...

As far as removing end connectors, wouldn't a wedge be better for separating the end connectors than trying to hammer at that odd angle? 

Did anyone else keep expecting a Kaiju to walk over the far hillside? 
 

When there isn't a lot of tension on the track, the field expedient method is to remove the wedge bolt and than knock off the end connectors with a sledgehammer.  The initial problem they had was they couldn't release enough tension to make the job easy.  At that point tankers call their maintenance buddies and tell them to bring a torch to cut those bastards off.  If they had done that they could have had that track back on and running within an hour.

 

As for using a track block or piece of lumber, won't work on an M1 and it doesn't look like it would work well on that Type-10 because there isn't enough clearance between the sprocket and overhanging hull.  It works on an M60 because the track will just push the read fender and sponson box up to make room.


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#9 wlewisiii

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 1929 PM

Ah. Never did get to transition to the M-1. Good to know.
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#10 Panzermann

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 1930 PM

Nice find. good to see that japanese tankers have the same problems as other tankers. ^_^

 

The work safety officer may have had an heart attack though, how they walked around in front of the end connector being removed. I don't understand, why they did not put the track back on. They would have just needed to roll it out completely, hammer a new connector on and pull it with the cable winch of the Type 90 ARV on. Maybe they did not want to disturb the dog & pony show anymore.

 

 

 

 

Demonstrating track repair in the field is VERY nice of them! It's a full demo!

Thoughts that occur to me. 

Pimping hydraulic suspension on the ARV...

As far as removing end connectors, wouldn't a wedge be better for separating the end connectors than trying to hammer at that odd angle? 

Did anyone else keep expecting a Kaiju to walk over the far hillside? 
 

When there isn't a lot of tension on the track, the field expedient method is to remove the wedge bolt and than knock off the end connectors with a sledgehammer.  The initial problem they had was they couldn't release enough tension to make the job easy.  At that point tankers call their maintenance buddies and tell them to bring a torch to cut those bastards off.  If they had done that they could have had that track back on and running within an hour.

 

As for using a track block or piece of lumber, won't work on an M1 and it doesn't look like it would work well on that Type-10 because there isn't enough clearance between the sprocket and overhanging hull.  It works on an M60 because the track will just push the read fender and sponson box up to make room.

 

 

 

 

 

With Leopard 2 we used a log or thick tree branch we found near the tank with thrown tank. I guess we used wood, because it gives and is mostly crushed in the process of leveraginbg the track back on. Though in the case of this 90式戦車only the complete removal would have worked As you say.

 

 

 

Too bad we cannot see, how they threw the track. Maybe imprudent maneuvering  while using the hydrgas suspension? :unsure:


Edited by Panzermann, 11 February 2019 - 1931 PM.

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#11 Panzermann

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 1951 PM

from the recommended videos

 

 

very Leopard in its design.

 

 

But the japanese are cheating by using a second crane for the engine deck and putting the same powerpack back in. ;)

 

 

 

(bloody youtube auto translate calls it a Netzteil - power supply unit in german)

 

 

 

Notice the Type 74 struggling uphill in the background. The tank weather coming down pouring did not help.

 


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#12 Special-K

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 2243 PM

Yes, very cool how their suspension works! I'm not sure if I understand its combat utility though, but I guess they can lower their profile when hull down, and have an easier time shooting into tall buildings or down a hill.


-K
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#13 rmgill

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 2303 PM

Sorta like a camel that kneels for the rider to get on? 

:ph34r:


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#14 Manic Moran

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 0156 AM

If you are on the reverse side of a hill and want to shoot down the far side more than the gun will depress, it can be handy. Useful in countries with a lot of hills, like Japan and Korea.

I also note that the Type 10 in the first video didnt seem to have pads on the tracks. I also note the mechanics on the engine change using a variant of point-and-call, very Japanese.
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#15 Panzermann

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 0308 AM

Sorta like a camel that kneels for the rider to get on? 

:ph34r:

 

In case of the ARV, yes. Indeed. :lol:

 

 

Didn't know they bothered to put the adjustable suspension into the ARV. But it is probabaly a help when working on a slope. At night. In a rain storm. You know, tank weather.


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#16 JasonJ

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 0739 AM

Oops indeed but at least they didn't do it again the following year's event :D
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#17 Mikel2

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 0746 AM

Did the extra tensioner in the M47 make much of a difference? Seemed to work quite well during the battle of the Bulge :)
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#18 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 0747 AM

:D


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#19 Mikel2

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 0858 AM

Going back to the M47, given that it was no great departure -running gear-wise- from most other post war US tanks, why did the designers feel the need to add that extra tensioner?
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#20 DogDodger

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Posted 12 February 2019 - 1333 PM

Sorta like a camel that kneels for the rider to get on? 

:ph34r:


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