Jump to content


Photo

Cold War, The Reimagined Series


  • Please log in to reply
6805 replies to this topic

#6801 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,021 posts
  • Location:Moscow, Russia
  • Interests:Tank recovery

Posted Yesterday, 01:27 PM

 

 

So they take legacy systems, kitbash them into something new, build paltry amounts, and the US responds by developing new defensive equipment, whcih it can afford. That point it all looks a bit pointless to me. Its not even making significant work for the Russian defence industry, because as pointed out, much of it is legacy stuff from the USSR.

Actually Russian defense industry is now overloaded with work. It is relatively cheap now to build new plant, getting machine tools is bigger problems (as Soviet machine tools production is almost completely wiped out by "reformists") but it is possible to buy them abroad; but qualified workforce is main problem. Old generation is mostly gone, and after two decades of every young man or woman trying to become manager or criminal, finding qualified welder or machine tool operator is hard task. Training good welder may take years....
    Now Rus state is taking massive efforts to address the problem, but still it will take years to recover


  • 0

#6802 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,021 posts
  • Location:Moscow, Russia
  • Interests:Tank recovery

Posted Yesterday, 01:41 PM


  • 0

#6803 Rick

Rick

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,327 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Muncie, Indiana

Posted Today, 06:03 AM

 

 

 

So they take legacy systems, kitbash them into something new, build paltry amounts, and the US responds by developing new defensive equipment, whcih it can afford. That point it all looks a bit pointless to me. Its not even making significant work for the Russian defence industry, because as pointed out, much of it is legacy stuff from the USSR.

Actually Russian defense industry is now overloaded with work. It is relatively cheap now to build new plant, getting machine tools is bigger problems (as Soviet machine tools production is almost completely wiped out by "reformists") but it is possible to buy them abroad; but qualified workforce is main problem. Old generation is mostly gone, and after two decades of every young man or woman trying to become manager or criminal, finding qualified welder or machine tool operator is hard task. Training good welder may take years....
    Now Rus state is taking massive efforts to address the problem, but still it will take years to recover

 

Roman, as a reminder, I don't follow foreign policies, but is the Russian defense industry "overloaded" via foreign military orders?

Your commet "...every young man or woman trying to become (a) manager or criminal..." is interesting. Can you elaborate?


  • 0

#6804 Roman Alymov

Roman Alymov

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 17,021 posts
  • Location:Moscow, Russia
  • Interests:Tank recovery

Posted Today, 09:42 AM

Roman, as a reminder, I don't follow foreign policies, but is the Russian defense industry "overloaded" via foreign military orders?

 

Foreign deals are part of the load, but it is not correct to say foreign military orders are the main part of workload. Actual amount may vary significantly from one company to another...  For example, Rostov -on-Don helicopter plant is in 3-shifts-mode from 2013 - while Russian helicopter export is limited.
   Foreign military orders effectively saved Russian defense industry in 1990th-early 2000th, when Russian state was not able to provide adequate funding. But now their importance is limited.

 

 

Your commet "...every young man or woman trying to become (a) manager or criminal..." is interesting. Can you elaborate?

 

 

I think this old article would be best answer here

http://old.themoscow...tmt/298561.html

Russian Youth Prefer Crime To Space


  • 0

#6805 Dark_Falcon

Dark_Falcon

    The Stryker's Friend

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,137 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicagoland

Posted Today, 11:44 AM

This is a piece I should have posted earlier this month but as advanced weapons development is being discussed it fits now:

 

 

Navy Quietly Fires 20 Hyper Velocity Projectiles Through Destroyer’s Deckgun

4669213.jpg

Guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey (DDG-105) transits the Pacific Ocean while underway in the U.S. 3rd Fleet area of operations. US Navy Photo

 

Last summer USS Dewey (DDG-105) fired 20 hyper velocity projectiles (HVP) from a standard Mk 45 5-inch deck gun in a quiet experiment that’s set to add new utility to the weapon found on almost every U.S. warship, officials familiar with the test have told USNI News.

 

The test, conducted by the Navy and the Pentagon’s Strategic Capabilities Office as part of the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2018 international exercise, was part of a series of studies to prove the Navy could turn the more than 40-year-old deck gun design into an effective and low-cost weapon against cruise missiles and larger unmanned aerial vehicles.

 

While the HVP was originally designed to be the projectile for the electromagnetic railgun, the Navy and the Pentagon see the potential for a new missile defense weapon that can launch a guided round at near-hypersonic speeds.

 

Currently, the fleet uses a combination of missiles – like the Evolved Seasparrow Missile, the Rolling Airframe Missile and the Standard Missile 2 – to ward off cruise missile threats. The missiles are effective but also expensive, Bryan Clark with the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments told USNI News on Monday.

 

In 2016, guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG-87) fired three missiles to ward off two suspected Iranian cruise missiles fired from Houthi rebels in the Red Sea, in what amounted to a multi-million dollar engagement.

 

1434555289965.jpg

An artist’s conception of BAE Systems’ Hyper Velocity Projectile. BAE Systems Image

 

“So if you think about the kinds of threats you might face in the Middle East, the lower-end cruise missiles or a larger UAV, now you have a way to shoot them down that doesn’t require you use a $2 million ESSM or $1 million RAM because a hyper velocity projectile – even in the highest-end estimates have it in the $75,000 to $100,000 range, and that’s for the fanciest version of it with an onboard seeker,” he said.

 

An added benefit of using HVP in powder guns is the gun’s high rate of fire and a large magazine capacity.

 

“You can get 15 rounds a minute for an air defense mission as well as a surface-to-surface mission,” Clark said. “That adds significant missile defense capacity when you think that each of those might be replacing a ESSM or a RAM missile. They’re a lot less expensive.”

 

Screen-Shot-2015-06-01-at-10.43.11-AM.pn

A range of hyper velocity projectiles from different weapon systems. BAE Systems Image

 

 

Just the 5-inch version of the HVP could be a major upgrade for ships equipped with this gun and its cheap enough to defeat British Treasury objections, though I don't think it would receive such objections when it would let them buy fewer missiles instead.  Canada and any other NATOnation using such guns could also benefit, as could Australia and Japan.  And 155mm version could significant alter the artillery imbalance in NATO's favor.

 

(Note that the second image came from the BAE Systems page on the HVP, as the image on the USNI page was coming through distorted.)


Edited by Dark_Falcon, Today, 11:50 AM.

  • 0

#6806 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 49,304 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eloiland

Posted Today, 11:50 AM

I believe they were actually looking at the same gun from the AS90 as a potential future upgrade for the Class 45 destroyer.  I dont know if that is still on the cards though.


  • 0




2 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users