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Interesting Personal Perspective On The Sgt. York Divad


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#41 shep854

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 2001 PM

My thought was that, as a tank, the M48 would be more deliberate in its movements, with support vehicles often having to move faster to maintain position, so the visibility problems weren't as much of an issue as with the Sgt. York system trying to stay in place as a support asset.
I hope I'm expressing myself.

Edited by shep854, 05 January 2018 - 2002 PM.

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#42 DKTanker

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 2030 PM

Might be that the issue of barrels and radar disc hitting trees is more of an issue when the system is on auto? That problem doesn't exist in tanks.

It did with the M60 series when stabilization was on.  Of course it would be the very ill trained crew to have their system on auto while moving through the trees.  If for no other reason that they couldn't engage aircraft in such close quarters.


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#43 Wobbly Head

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 0931 AM

Might be that the issue of barrels and radar disc hitting trees is more of an issue when the system is on auto? That problem doesn't exist in tanks.

It did with the M60 series when stabilization was on.  Of course it would be the very ill trained crew to have their system on auto while moving through the trees.  If for no other reason that they couldn't engage aircraft in such close quarters.

Not just trees. Try buildings poles even the ground barrel strikes have always been a problem in tanks and Stab just makes it easier for the crew to hit things. The barrel of a tank is a lot more sensitive than people think even just a simple barrel strike with no damage still required 20 man hours of work on Challenger1 before they would allow it near a firing line. So those movies where you see a tank driving through a building barrel first in real life the crew would more likely be killed by the repair crew than the enemy.
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#44 JWB

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 1047 AM

FF to 5:00 :lol:

 


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#45 TOW-2

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 0245 AM

In the name of your own sanity, mute the audio.


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#46 shep854

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 1122 AM

Neither my iPhone nor Android tablet can play the link. Is it the runaway Rus SPAAA gun?
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#47 JWB

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 1305 PM

Neither my iPhone nor Android tablet can play the link. Is it the runaway Rus SPAAA gun?

It stopped working for some reason. Try this:

 


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#48 TOW-2

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 2035 PM

Also, it's weird that the electronics (or many of them) were still inside the vehicle.


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#49 Dawes

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Posted 15 January 2018 - 1204 PM

The following was extracted from a DTIC report on the Sgt York system. Didn't realize that the M247 had some sort of laser tracking/engagement mode.:

 

 

LasingTargets. There were two primary modes used for lasing a target. There was the Optical/Laser acquisition mode previously described as engaging targets without the support of radar capability. In the Optical/Laser mode, the IFF did not identify targets so that targets had to be visually identified during tracking. In the Optical mode, the only way to give target range and speed data to the fire control computer (FCC) was by lasing. When added to either the Radar Auto mode or the Radar Pointer mode, lasing a target could provide greater accuracy to the radar-based fire control solution.

 

Provided that the target could be seen in the gunsight and that there was time to arm the laser, greater accuracy was possible. A flow diagram of the lase procedure is presented in Figure 17. To initiate the lase procedure, the GROUND-AIR switch was set for target type by the gunner. The switch was located on the gunner's control panel. In ground mode, the narrow laser beam matched coverage of the gunsight inner reticle circle, and point detonating ammunition was automatically selected. After the GROUND-AIR switch had been set, the laser switch was set to ARM by the gunner. The ARMED indicator lamp indicated the laser armed condition. See Figure 18 depicting the gunner's control panel for laser.

 

If the crew decided to lase a target without radar, then the gunner was to set the OPT switch to slave and release. This would place the gunner in gunner slave condition. The gunner was then in control. The guns moved to gunsight LOS, and the gunner's trigger was enabled. Concurrently, the squad leader was free to move the periscope for search activities, and the squad leader's trigger was not enabled. The squad leader's OPT switch was set to free, while the gunner's switch was set to slave. See Figure 19 for a line drawing of the gunner's right control grip which indicates the OPT toggle switch. After the laser had been armed, the laser track button was pushed. Pushing the laser track button erased any earlier target range data. Gunsight control was given to the gunner, and the laser was prepared for firing.

 

Figure 20 represents the gunner's left control grip and the location of the laser track button.
The thumb tracker (right control grip) was used to move the center of the small reticle circle to the selected target area (see Figure 19). As soon as the circle was moving at the same rate as the lased spot, the laser track button was released. There were laser cues on the display. The thumb tracker was used to continue to make small corrections as the target was tracked. Periscope and gunsight eye pieces blinked until the range data was received. When the range data was accepted, the laser cue came on steady. The target would now be considered in laser acquisition, and could be engaged.
 


Edited by Dawes, 15 January 2018 - 1207 PM.

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#50 DKTanker

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 1902 PM

The following was extracted from a DTIC report on the Sgt York system. Didn't realize that the M247 had some sort of laser tracking/engagement mode.:

A laser rangefinder takes up little room, it makes sense to have a relatively cheap and reliable backup to the radar system.


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