Jump to content


Photo

Astronomical Stargazer Thread


  • Please log in to reply
176 replies to this topic

#161 BansheeOne

BansheeOne

    Bullshit filter overload, venting into civility charger

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13,637 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Berlin

Posted 17 February 2019 - 0912 AM

NASA’s faraway space snowman has flat, not round, behind

 
By MARCIA DUNN February 11, 2019
 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The faraway space snowman visited by NASA last month has a surprisingly flat — not round — behind.

 

New photos from the New Horizons spacecraft offer a new perspective on the small cosmic body 4 billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) away. The two-lobed object, nicknamed Ultima Thule, is actually flatter on the backside than originally thought, according to scientists.

 

Pictures released late last week — taken shortly after closest approach on New Year’s Day — provide an outline of the side not illuminated by the sun.

 

When viewed from the front, Ultima Thule still resembles a two-ball snowman. But from the side , the snowman looks squashed, sort of like a lemon and pie stuck together, end to end.

 

“Seeing more data has significantly changed our view,” Southwest Research Institute’s Alan Stern, the lead scientist, said in a statement. “It would be closer to reality to say Ultima Thule’s shape is flatter, like a pancake. But more importantly, the new images are creating scientific puzzles about how such an object could even be formed. We’ve never seen something like this orbiting the sun.”

 

Project scientist Hal Weaver of Johns Hopkins University, home to New Horizons flight control center, said the finding should spark new theories on how such primitive objects formed early in the solar system.

 

Ultima Thule — considered a contact binary — is the most distant world ever explored. New Horizons zipped past it at high speed, after becoming the first visitor to Pluto in 2015. Mission managers hope to target an even more distant celestial object in this so-called Kuiper Belt, on the frozen fringes of the solar system, if the spacecraft remains healthy.

 

New Horizons is already 32 million miles (52 million kilometers) beyond Ultima Thule. It will take another 1 ½ years to beam back all the flyby data.

 

The spacecraft rocketed from Florida in 2006.

 

800.jpeg

 

https://www.apnews.c...fd862974c2507b7


  • 0

#162 JamesR

JamesR

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 684 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin, TX
  • Interests:Military hardware, Shooting, Reloading, Computers, Astronomy

Posted 20 February 2019 - 0118 AM

Any of you guys dabble in astrophotography?  I've been at it for a couple of years now, still have a lot to learn but I'd like to share a few of my recent images:

 

M42, The Orion Nebula. 

 

DihCvB6qfzH__620x0_kHqiM4gq.jpg

 

 

NGC 2244 which is the open star cluster that's in the nebula.  The nebula is known as the Rosette nebula:

 

uYnN3rUT5Xdf_620x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg

 

 

Here's the moon from the recent lunar eclipse (Jan 2019)

 

Z-kXtcxIUG-Z_620x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg

 

 


  • 0

#163 Ssnake

Ssnake

    Virtual Shiva Beast

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 6,075 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hannover, Germany
  • Interests:Contemporary armor - tactics and technology

Posted 20 February 2019 - 0158 AM

Maybe three decades ago pictures of that quality could only be made by professional observatories.


  • 0

#164 Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe

    Now is the winter of our discontent

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 31,469 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:deep in the heart of ... darkness, USA
  • Interests:military technology, military history, weapon systems, management/organizational design, early American history

Posted 20 February 2019 - 0722 AM

Really nice, thanks for sharing.


  • 0

#165 Corinthian

Corinthian

    Stone Age Bitter Delusional Retard

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,267 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Peek-a-boo, I'm behind you.
  • Interests:Wholesome stuff.

Posted 20 February 2019 - 1543 PM

One of the Israelis here does astrophotography.

Great pix! Wot is your setup?
  • 0

#166 JamesR

JamesR

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 684 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin, TX
  • Interests:Military hardware, Shooting, Reloading, Computers, Astronomy

Posted 20 February 2019 - 2313 PM

Maybe three decades ago pictures of that quality could only be made by professional observatories.

 

It is amazing just how far technology has come. I was able to create these using a 70mm refractor with a 6mp camera in the light pollution of North Austin, TX.

 

 

Really nice, thanks for sharing.

 

Thanks :)

 

One of the Israelis here does astrophotography.

Great pix! Wot is your setup?

 

Thanks.  The equipment I'm using:

 

Telescope:  Stellarvue SV70T with the .8 reducer

Mount:  Celestron AVX

Camera:  ZWO ASI178mm with the TEC cooler

Numerous imaging filters in a ZWO filter wheel (LRGB and Ha, O3, S2)

Plus a few other bits (guide camera, usb hub, laptop, etc)

 

The capture software I'm using is Sequence Generator Pro.

Most of processing is done with Pixinsight, although I'll sometimes do a little touch up in Photoshop.


  • 0

#167 Panzermann

Panzermann

    REFORGER '79

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,414 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Teutonistan

Posted 22 February 2019 - 0554 AM

Very nice photographs! :)

 

 

Only like twenty years ago or so, astronomers at a  small observatory would have killed for this. Crazy how good cheap (relatively) equipment is nowadays. I can remember when big glass plates were put into the camera, when I visited an observatory.


  • 0

#168 JamesR

JamesR

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 684 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin, TX
  • Interests:Military hardware, Shooting, Reloading, Computers, Astronomy

Posted 23 February 2019 - 2205 PM

Very nice photographs! :)

 

 

Only like twenty years ago or so, astronomers at a  small observatory would have killed for this. Crazy how good cheap (relatively) equipment is nowadays. I can remember when big glass plates were put into the camera, when I visited an observatory.

 

Thanks :)


  • 0

#169 Corinthian

Corinthian

    Stone Age Bitter Delusional Retard

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,267 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Peek-a-boo, I'm behind you.
  • Interests:Wholesome stuff.

Posted 24 February 2019 - 0012 AM

Could you post a pic of your setup JamesR?


  • 0

#170 JamesR

JamesR

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 684 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin, TX
  • Interests:Military hardware, Shooting, Reloading, Computers, Astronomy

Posted 24 February 2019 - 0125 AM

Could you post a pic of your setup JamesR?

 

Yep...

 

 

N5xA35F.jpg

 

 

 

My cable management has been improved since this image was taken, dangling cables aren't good for guiding.  The other component missing from the shot is a cheap laptop I use to run everything.  It would be setup on that pink laptop trey.

 

The imaging scope is the bottom one.  The slightly larger scope on top is an older achromatic refractor that I've repurposed as a guide scope.  That smaller black scope looking thing is the celestron starsense. 


  • 0

#171 JamesR

JamesR

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 684 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin, TX
  • Interests:Military hardware, Shooting, Reloading, Computers, Astronomy

Posted 24 February 2019 - 0135 AM

Here's the link to might astrobin site.  You can see that some of my earlier images aren't as good as my recent stuff (bloated, elongated stars and excessive noise).  If you go to the astrobin home page you will see some really amazing stuff.  Some of these guys that post there have remote observatories in very dark skies with the best equipment.

 

 

https://www.astrobin.com/users/JamesR/


  • 0

#172 Corinthian

Corinthian

    Stone Age Bitter Delusional Retard

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,267 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Peek-a-boo, I'm behind you.
  • Interests:Wholesome stuff.

Posted 24 February 2019 - 0559 AM

Awesome setup. How heavy does it weight?

I'm looking to build my own setup. Just a simple one so I can bring it with me when I go to the field. Likely having it portered though heheh
  • 0

#173 Rick

Rick

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,529 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Muncie, Indiana

Posted 24 February 2019 - 0623 AM

Very impressive. As a side note, my day job is ophthalmic photography. Slightly smaller orbs than what your photographing  :D


  • 0

#174 JamesR

JamesR

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 684 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin, TX
  • Interests:Military hardware, Shooting, Reloading, Computers, Astronomy

Posted 24 February 2019 - 1327 PM

Awesome setup. How heavy does it weight?

I'm looking to build my own setup. Just a simple one so I can bring it with me when I go to the field. Likely having it portered though heheh

 

The whole rig is probably around 40lbs/18Kg.

 

There's a lot of different options out there now, more so than even just a couple of years ago.  You could start with a camera tracker and a dslr  and a small scope like this:

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=YVtl_nZLDoQ

 

That guys youtube channel is actually very good.  I watched a bunch of his videos when I was starting out.

 

Cloudynights is the best forum on the topic.  I spend a lot of time over there soaking up information:

 

https://www.cloudynights.com/index

 

 

Very impressive. As a side note, my day job is ophthalmic photography. Slightly smaller orbs than what your photographing  :D

 

Thanks :)

 

Yea,,, just a little smaller... but a whole lot closer, lol.


  • 0

#175 JamesR

JamesR

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 684 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Austin, TX
  • Interests:Military hardware, Shooting, Reloading, Computers, Astronomy

Posted 04 March 2019 - 1609 PM

Just finished up another astro image. The data did not come from my telescope. It was captured by one of my club members. He's got a telescope setup in a remote observatory in Marathon Texas. The skies are very dark out there. The software used to capture the data was Sequence Generator pro, same program I use with my telescope. I did the target framing and all the processing.

 

There's a lot going on in this image. The two larger Galaxies are M81 and M82. There's also a few other galaxies hiding in this image. The faint nebula structures are known as Integrated Flux Nebula (IFN). It is essentially large clouds of dust on the edge of our galaxy that is being illuminated by the star light of our galaxy. How cool is that? It's very faint and would be very difficult to capture in light polluted skies.

 

This image is pretty large so I just used the thumbnail for this post.  The full size image is here (without the labels):

 

https://www.astrobin.../full/393950/0/

 

47abe4f1-abe9-4ac8-a855-402ebae3b082-155

 

 


  • 0

#176 Corinthian

Corinthian

    Stone Age Bitter Delusional Retard

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,267 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Peek-a-boo, I'm behind you.
  • Interests:Wholesome stuff.

Posted 04 March 2019 - 2106 PM

Beautiful!


  • 0

#177 Ssnake

Ssnake

    Virtual Shiva Beast

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 6,075 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hannover, Germany
  • Interests:Contemporary armor - tactics and technology

Posted 05 March 2019 - 0251 AM

WOW.


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users