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Attack On Yontan Airfield


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#1 MiloMorai

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 1428 PM

https://youtu.be/zae0HsMjPGg

 

https://thenewsrep.c...rfield-okinawa/

 

You experts here probably knew about this, but is news for me..


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#2 Michael Eastes

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 1538 PM

I lived about a mile from what had been Yontan airfield as a kid; it was a Marine air station then, 1959-62. I heard the story first from my dad, during one of our battle tour drives around the island. Battle damage was still in evidence all over the southern part of Okinawa. It was possibly the hardest fought battle of our war. .
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#3 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 0630 AM

You know, this is is eerily similar to what the SAS planned to do on the Argentine airfields hosting Etendards. To the point where you wonder if someone in the UK had read about it.

 

https://en.wikipedia...peration_Mikado

 

Complete and total madness of course.


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#4 Chris Werb

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 1012 AM

If that scenario arose again in the not too distant future, we could hit the runway and facilities with Tomahawks and the aircraft on the ground with SPEAR 3. You could even use a SPEAR 3 to recce the base by overflying it a few times before attacking. That said, an F-35B ought to be good to operate with Paveway IV vs the Argentine AF as they have no medium-long range SAMs and the aircraft should have no problem at all achieving air supremacy, even pre Meteor.


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#5 Michael Eastes

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 1834 PM

You know, this is is eerily similar to what the SAS planned to do on the Argentine airfields hosting Etendards. To the point where you wonder if someone in the UK had read about it.
 
https://en.wikipedia...peration_Mikado
 
Complete and total madness of course.


Mikado was appropriately named.

I saw a BBC program years ago that showed a recreation of an SAS raid on an Argentine airfield full of Pucharas, which was reportedly successful. I suspect that the facility was much closer and less well defended than the main naval/Marine base was.
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#6 Burncycle360

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 2203 PM

I had never heard of this one.

It was lucky for us IMO that the Japanese didn't resort to suicide tactics earlier when there weren't many carriers in the Pacific.  Wouldn't have changed the outcome but would have certainly delayed us going on the offensive.


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#7 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 0204 AM

 

You know, this is is eerily similar to what the SAS planned to do on the Argentine airfields hosting Etendards. To the point where you wonder if someone in the UK had read about it.
 
https://en.wikipedia...peration_Mikado
 
Complete and total madness of course.


Mikado was appropriately named.

I saw a BBC program years ago that showed a recreation of an SAS raid on an Argentine airfield full of Pucharas, which was reportedly successful. I suspect that the facility was much closer and less well defended than the main naval/Marine base was.

 

 

That would be the Raid on Pebble Island, which I think would have been on West Falkland. Landing on the Argentinian mainland would really be sticking ones head in the noose, and probably have escalated the war.

https://en.wikipedia...n_Pebble_Island

 

Thanks for the link Milo Morai, that is one extremely ballsy operation. And very imaginative.


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#8 MiloMorai

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 0847 AM

You are welcome Stuart.


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#9 Inhapi

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 1304 PM

Would the Pucaras have had any significant effect on the campaign ?


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#10 Rick

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 0434 AM

For the Japanese it seems desperate times breed desperate actions.


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#11 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 0543 AM

Would the Pucaras have had any significant effect on the campaign ?

 

Its an effective coin aircraft, but that really wasnt the kind of war they were fighting in the Falklands. The worst that could have happened would have been contributing to the Harrier Forces kills.

 

I seem to recall at least one of them was brought down by a Blowpipe, which was an notoriously difficult weapon to use. I think that kind of puts it into perspective.


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#12 Inhapi

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 0404 AM

I guess they would also have been easy meat for seacat....


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#13 DougRichards

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 0419 AM

 

You know, this is is eerily similar to what the SAS planned to do on the Argentine airfields hosting Etendards. To the point where you wonder if someone in the UK had read about it.
 
https://en.wikipedia...peration_Mikado
 
Complete and total madness of course.


Mikado was appropriately named.

I saw a BBC program years ago that showed a recreation of an SAS raid on an Argentine airfield full of Pucharas, which was reportedly successful. I suspect that the facility was much closer and less well defended than the main naval/Marine base was.

 

 

SAS meets Gilbert and Sullivan....I'm sure they never would be missed......    

 

I've got a little list

 

 

(and all Australians of all kinds)........


Edited by DougRichards, 14 October 2018 - 0422 AM.

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#14 RETAC21

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 0550 AM

 

Would the Pucaras have had any significant effect on the campaign ?

 

Its an effective coin aircraft, but that really wasnt the kind of war they were fighting in the Falklands. The worst that could have happened would have been contributing to the Harrier Forces kills.

 

I seem to recall at least one of them was brought down by a Blowpipe, which was an notoriously difficult weapon to use. I think that kind of puts it into perspective.

 

 

A quick glance at the wikipedia paints a less rosy picture:

 

24 were deployed to the Malvinas

1 was destroyed in Stanley by a cluster bomb and one damaged

2 more in the SAS raid with 3 damaged

Between 16 and 20th May, they flew 19 armed recon sorties with one shot down by a Stinger and another by a Sea Harrier

on May 24th a bomb destroyed another

During the Darwin battle, they suffered 2 more damaged and one crashed, but they shot down a Scout Mk.1 helicopter

4 were serviceable in the last battles around Stanley, with the others damaged or unserviceable.

 

Most of the damage was done by shrapnel or small arms, so they weren't particularly damage resistant.


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#15 Inhapi

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 1056 AM

 

 

Would the Pucaras have had any significant effect on the campaign ?

 

Its an effective coin aircraft, but that really wasnt the kind of war they were fighting in the Falklands. The worst that could have happened would have been contributing to the Harrier Forces kills.

 

I seem to recall at least one of them was brought down by a Blowpipe, which was an notoriously difficult weapon to use. I think that kind of puts it into perspective.

 

 

A quick glance at the wikipedia paints a less rosy picture:

 

24 were deployed to the Malvinas

1 was destroyed in Stanley by a cluster bomb and one damaged

2 more in the SAS raid with 3 damaged

Between 16 and 20th May, they flew 19 armed recon sorties with one shot down by a Stinger and another by a Sea Harrier

on May 24th a bomb destroyed another

During the Darwin battle, they suffered 2 more damaged and one crashed, but they shot down a Scout Mk.1 helicopter

4 were serviceable in the last battles around Stanley, with the others damaged or unserviceable.

 

Most of the damage was done by shrapnel or small arms, so they weren't particularly damage resistant.

 

 

Some Flak Vierlings around the landing beaches would have come in  handy :-)


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#16 DB

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 1204 PM

Sea Cat was almost useless.

Sea Wolf wouldn't have the range to defend land positions from attack, unless they practically flew over the ship with them aboard.

Sea Dart wasn't really capable of engaging targets in ground clutter at the time.

Do I need to mention Sea Slug? If so, they could have used some for shore bombardment against their airfield.

Edited by DB, 15 October 2018 - 1204 PM.

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#17 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 1207 PM

 

 

Would the Pucaras have had any significant effect on the campaign ?

 

Its an effective coin aircraft, but that really wasnt the kind of war they were fighting in the Falklands. The worst that could have happened would have been contributing to the Harrier Forces kills.

 

I seem to recall at least one of them was brought down by a Blowpipe, which was an notoriously difficult weapon to use. I think that kind of puts it into perspective.

 

 

A quick glance at the wikipedia paints a less rosy picture:

 

24 were deployed to the Malvinas

1 was destroyed in Stanley by a cluster bomb and one damaged

2 more in the SAS raid with 3 damaged

Between 16 and 20th May, they flew 19 armed recon sorties with one shot down by a Stinger and another by a Sea Harrier

on May 24th a bomb destroyed another

During the Darwin battle, they suffered 2 more damaged and one crashed, but they shot down a Scout Mk.1 helicopter

4 were serviceable in the last battles around Stanley, with the others damaged or unserviceable.

 

Most of the damage was done by shrapnel or small arms, so they weren't particularly damage resistant.

 

 

Was that a Stinger? I do remember it was a SF patrol. Thanks for reminding me about the Scout.

 

It was the wrong war. I think it would have done better somewhere like Iraq or Vietnam. Even the Bronco proved a dud when they actually used it against a peer oponent.


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#18 RETAC21

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Posted 17 October 2018 - 1312 PM

Yes, it was a Stinger, legend has it that it was handed to the SAS without user instructions. Pucara wouldn't have done good on any battlefield of the 80s as it is vulnerable to MANPADS and light cannon, and the trycicle landing gear would not be rough enough for off field ops. It's a kewl lookin ship though!


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#19 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 17 October 2018 - 1331 PM

I remember seeing one (along with an Argentine Jeep, still with Falklands mud on it) at RNAS Yeovilton in about 1983 or so. Impressive looking aircraft I agree, im sure at COIN it was not much different to a Bronco, but as you say, it was a different kind of war.

 

The real game changer would have been parking Mirages and Daggers on the Falklands, but they never really seemed to be up for that.


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