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Scammel Recovery


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#1 MiloMorai

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 1523 PM

 

 

http://youtu.be/I-W8FSUFE_g

 

 

 


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#2 Chris Werb

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 1755 PM

The British Commonwealth weren't the only users...

 

https://youtu.be/w360MmIK2po?t=402


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#3 MiloMorai

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 1823 PM

What got me is how complicated the Brits made the operation of the vehicle.


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#4 rmgill

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 0145 AM

How so? It's basically a short wheel base M26....similar axle system, low gearing and large pulling capacity on the winch system. 


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#5 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 0232 AM

They were seemingly well built too, if their presence as late as the 1980's hauling fairground rides, or their present usual presence at British military vehicle shows is any guide. Probably overbuilt if anything.


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#6 MiloMorai

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 0649 AM

How so? It's basically a short wheel base M26....similar axle system, low gearing and large pulling capacity on the winch system. 

 

Examples: using hydraulic jacks to hold up the trailer when it is removed from the tractor, operation of the rear ramps....


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#7 Chris Werb

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 1159 AM

They were seemingly well built too, if their presence as late as the 1980's hauling fairground rides, or their present usual presence at British military vehicle shows is any guide. Probably overbuilt if anything.

 

I've only seen post-war Scammel Explorers employed like that. Back in the 1980s Colchester  Corporation buses had one as a recovery vehicle - they were still in use with the TA up to the early 80s, by which time there would already have been plenty of Leyland Martian and Militant Mk III recoveries to replace them.


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#8 DougRichards

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 2107 PM

It is interesting that the USA actually had two different wheeled recovery outfits: the M19 based on the M20 tractor and M9 trailer.  Something like 5,000 of which were produced, but also the M25 rig.  Adding of course the M32 tracked and armoured vehicle.


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#9 Chris Werb

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 0259 AM

And the M31 that preceded the M32 IIRC.
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#10 DougRichards

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 0304 AM

And the M31 that preceded the M32 IIRC.

 

And of course someone has made a kit of it.

 

http://www.finescale...ecovery-vehicle

 

But still no 1/35 Diamond T.  There was a Matchbox kit a while ago.  Airfix did the Scammell in 1/76, but the more recent 1/35 Scammell from Thunder Models needs so much scratch building to correct as to be maybe not worth a second look.

 

(Why can't manufacturers forget the trendy PE and just produce a kit with the relevant details either in plastic or in a different form of molding?)

 

http://www.perthmili...tm35200g01.html

 

http://www.perthmili...tm35200g02.html

 

for instance:

 

One item that could do with some improvement is the large Under-Cab Tray located under the right side of the cab as the choice of using etched metal for this doesn't help as the PE is quite thin while the tray itself is made from thicker sturdy metal bars and end panels. This tray actually holds the large chains, shackles and other trailer gear when not in use and gets some quite heavy treatment.

 

The contours of the PE forward end panel are not correct and as the PE is so thin the support arm rod that should go from the tray frame to the front edge of the cab is simply missing as there's nowhere to attach this to the thin PE panel. Other details not correct due to the PE is the location of the front bars, this is actually a fold down 'door' with the complete bar section able to open and fold down for loading and unloading the tray but the PE bars are attached directly to the floor and sides meaning it's fixed in place without any of the lower hinge or side latch details. The actual tray has brackets on the end frames to attach the top metal bar with pins holding this in place, resulting in the attachment point extending out from the edge of the end brackets.

 

The PE bars at the front are quite thin and as a result difficult to keep straight and there are some intricate bends on the main PE part (PE1) that will require careful bending with a good bending tool and you will need to solder the tray together to have any chance of it staying assembled. During the soldering parts of the tray were constantly bending out of shape due to the thinness and softness of the PE. The rear wall of the tray is a separate solid piece of metal (PE2) that just butt joins to the front section and needs to be soldered perfectly flush with the edges of the main tray and this requires some care in aligning the parts while soldering.


Edited by DougRichards, 12 October 2018 - 0350 AM.

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#11 Chris Werb

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 1644 PM

Doug, Accurate Armour do a number of very impressive looking 1:35 Diamond Ts and both the Scammell Pioneer and Explorer.
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#12 rmgill

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 1702 PM

 

How so? It's basically a short wheel base M26....similar axle system, low gearing and large pulling capacity on the winch system. 

 

Examples: using hydraulic jacks to hold up the trailer when it is removed from the tractor, operation of the rear ramps....

 


The hand and PTO systems make the scammel simple, not complex. WWII era hydraulics were pretty maintenance intensive. The hydraulic jack pretty much makes for a pretty simple system designed for some heavy tasks. Given the task to recover 20-30 tons, on a chassis that can traverse off road terrain AND do so with what crew is in the cab of the truck, you have to have some manner of winching to handle the very heavy ramps and deal with everything else.

The design was also built with narrow streets/roads and tight turns. Compare to the US M26 Pacific truck/trailer combination which is lower but also MUCH longer.


Edited by rmgill, 12 October 2018 - 1713 PM.

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#13 rmgill

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 1706 PM


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#14 rmgill

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 1716 PM


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#15 rmgill

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 1719 PM

Oh, a Scammell pioneer is on my short list of MV's to acquire at some point. I've spent a bit of time researching them and looking at restoration blogs on them. They're GEARD REALLY low. Top speed, top gear, high range is apparently 25 MPH.

Here's one resto blog over on HMVF

http://hmvf.co.uk/to...er-restoration/


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#16 Chris Werb

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 1848 PM

What never ceases to surprise me about those threads is the amount of ancient obscure automotive parts squirrelled away over here that always seem to turn up whenever they're needed.
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#17 DougRichards

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 2217 PM

Doug, Accurate Armour do a number of very impressive looking 1:35 Diamond Ts and both the Scammell Pioneer and Explorer.

I see what you mean but the price is a little high.


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#18 Chris Werb

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 0710 AM

 

Doug, Accurate Armour do a number of very impressive looking 1:35 Diamond Ts and both the Scammell Pioneer and Explorer.

I see what you mean but the price is a little high.

 

 

For the time you would put into one of those kits, it's MUCH cheaper than spending the equivalent time on a lot of other hobbies, or even spending the time in the pub.

 

As an aside, my late father used to drive RR re-engined Diamond Ts in the REME in the 50s - this was to test them as he was at 36 Command Workshop long since privatised. Last time I looked at their yard, Babcock who now operate it, had it full of MRAPS.

 

https://www.google.c...m/data=!3m1!1e3


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#19 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 1358 PM

What never ceases to surprise me about those threads is the amount of ancient obscure automotive parts squirrelled away over here that always seem to turn up whenever they're needed.

 

Not just vehicles. I read on a railway website that a box of spare lightbulbs for NBL Class 22 Locomotives turned up in a former British Rail storeroom. They call got scrapped as long ago as the 1970s, but someone is building a replica so it will come in handy.


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#20 Chris Werb

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 1914 PM

 

What never ceases to surprise me about those threads is the amount of ancient obscure automotive parts squirrelled away over here that always seem to turn up whenever they're needed.

 

Not just vehicles. I read on a railway website that a box of spare lightbulbs for NBL Class 22 Locomotives turned up in a former British Rail storeroom. They call got scrapped as long ago as the 1970s, but someone is building a replica so it will come in handy.

 

 

Well, if someone wants to see what bits of old vehicles are left lying around the former 36 Command Workshops REME, their chance may come soon.

 

http://www.eadt.co.u...house-1-5640412


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