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Its Chili Season, Looking For Recipe Suggestions


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#41 Corinthian

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 0401 AM

Disappointed in the chili dish at the nearby diner. Too sweet! They used sweet tomatos or placed lots of sugar. It tastes more like sweet tomato sauce rather than chili. Unfortunately, when I requested they use less tomatoes and more chili, I was told that it came mixed already from the commissary (or whatever they called it). So I ended up placing a ton of hot sauce instead.


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#42 Colin

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 1212 PM

MY wife is interested in Chili making will have to show her this thread


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#43 Blunt Eversmoke

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Posted 16 December 2014 - 1407 PM

I have got into the habit of stirring in a spoonful of yellow curry into my chili  at lunch. Ran out recently and I decided to start using the unopened bag of garam masala spice mix that has been sitting in my cupboard unused instead. Wish I had done so much sooner. The spices in the garam masala complement the spices already in my Cincinnati chili much better in my opinion than the yellow curry. Though I would happily eat it with either. I am probably committing all kinds of cultural desecration with my "cooking". but that is what makes my chili so uniquely American.  :D

On topic of curry desecration of chili, try gradually adding A LOT as you cook it. Works especially well if you pervertedly pre-fry your ground beef (or, even more pervertedly, chicken) like I do before it goes into the pot - lots of extra time for all the curry added to absorb into the meat. Of course, nothing speaks against adding those extra spoons of curry during the whole process and towards the end of the actual cooking.

 

The first part of the ritual curried out, near the end you add mung bean sprouts and bamboo stripes to REALLY get that desecration vibe going - and serve it with half a tea spoon (not more) of cononut milk per portion.

Now lynch me :D


Edited by Blunt Eversmoke, 16 December 2014 - 1409 PM.

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#44 Mr King

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Posted 16 December 2014 - 1751 PM

 

I have got into the habit of stirring in a spoonful of yellow curry into my chili  at lunch. Ran out recently and I decided to start using the unopened bag of garam masala spice mix that has been sitting in my cupboard unused instead. Wish I had done so much sooner. The spices in the garam masala complement the spices already in my Cincinnati chili much better in my opinion than the yellow curry. Though I would happily eat it with either. I am probably committing all kinds of cultural desecration with my "cooking". but that is what makes my chili so uniquely American.  :D

On topic of curry desecration of chili, try gradually adding A LOT as you cook it. Works especially well if you pervertedly pre-fry your ground beef (or, even more pervertedly, chicken) like I do before it goes into the pot - lots of extra time for all the curry added to absorb into the meat. Of course, nothing speaks against adding those extra spoons of curry during the whole process and towards the end of the actual cooking.

 

The first part of the ritual curried out, near the end you add mung bean sprouts and bamboo stripes to REALLY get that desecration vibe going - and serve it with half a tea spoon (not more) of cononut milk per portion.

Now lynch me :D

 

 

 

I like the way you think.  :)


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#45 Blunt Eversmoke

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Posted 17 December 2014 - 1032 AM

I like the way you think.  :)

 

 

 Dito. I mean, not only do you add curry to your chili, but also garam masala - how fuckin' awesome is that :D Wish I could do that, but wifey hates the stuff and just adding some into my bowl is simply not the same as adding it into the pot - 

it has to cook some time for all the aroma to spread nicely :(

 

Oh, BTW, if you like garam masala in your chili, you might also like tandoori spice, or maybe even baharat (now that stuff rocks!).


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#46 Mr King

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Posted 17 December 2014 - 2047 PM

 

I like the way you think.  :)

 

 

 Dito. I mean, not only do you add curry to your chili, but also garam masala - how fuckin' awesome is that :D Wish I could do that, but wifey hates the stuff and just adding some into my bowl is simply not the same as adding it into the pot - 

it has to cook some time for all the aroma to spread nicely :(

 

Oh, BTW, if you like garam masala in your chili, you might also like tandoori spice, or maybe even baharat (now that stuff rocks!).

 

 

Those are really good suggestions. I am going to look into picking some up next time I hit the local little mom and pop Indian / Pakistani mart.  


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#47 Josh

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Posted 29 December 2014 - 1314 PM

What does the forum typically use as the meat base? I've experimented with other textures of meat and found that I like to substitute a ground beef with some ground buffalo (but not 100%, more like 1/3 - 1/2). I've also experimented with tossing in some raw chopped steak during the long simmer step and crispy fried bacon towards the end and like the result in texture; the bacon also adds a smoky salt flavor (though you might want to not add any other salt to that mix). I also try to add a little vinegar and brown sugar, the form ideally juice from a jar of high end pickles. I'll have to put together a batch for the super bowl or something; I don't think I cooked any since the beginning of the summer.


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#48 Harold Jones

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Posted 29 December 2014 - 1431 PM

I use whatever I have handy in a large enough amount to make the size batch I need.  I like beef, venison or buffalo cut up into 1/2" cubes but ground beef or buffalo work just as well for me.


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#49 Murph

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 2119 PM

Chili, should never have beans, never.
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#50 Mr King

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Posted 19 May 2015 - 2200 PM

Unless you want it to be delicious....then add beans  :D  :P

 

I can't think of very many American foods that are more contested about how they are made. 


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#51 chino

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 0822 AM

In Singapore, when we say Chili, we refer to the vegetable - eaten pure and unadulterated.

http://static1.squar...8/?format=1000w


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#52 Corinthian

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Posted 20 May 2015 - 1836 PM

In Singapore, when we say Chili, we refer to the vegetable - eaten pure and unadulterated.

http://static1.squar...8/?format=1000w

 

Same here.

 

It is awesome when minced and mixed with sisig. ^_^

 

6174331827_16bddc3f16.jpg

 

(^the chili not yet minced and mixed with the sisig)


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#53 Mr King

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 0322 AM

In Singapore, when we say Chili, we refer to the vegetable - eaten pure and unadulterated.

http://static1.squar...8/?format=1000w

 

In the States chili can mean the dish, or the vegetable, but we also call a chili a pepper, not to be confused with the pepper that comes from the peppercorns of the pepper plant......English is such a bastard language. 


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#54 Murph

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 1651 PM

Beans are fixin's and go on the side of the heavenly dish.  Only a barbarian, ignorant of the qualities of great cuisine adds them to the pot!  :D   You can place them carefully beside the bowl of red, same with cornbread, rice, etc.  Only the pure elixer goes in the pot!

Unless you want it to be delicious....then add beans  :D  :P

 

I can't think of very many American foods that are more contested about how they are made. 


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#55 Ivanhoe

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Posted 23 May 2015 - 2201 PM

Texans get all sorts of stuff wrong, but the chili+rice thing is brilliant. Especially if you use rice with some tooth to it, like wild & brown.


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#56 Mr King

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 1847 PM

I think the only culinary topic that is more contested in America than chili and beans is what kind of wood to smoke with. 


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#57 Rickard N

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 2312 PM

 

Beans are fixin's and go on the side of the heavenly dish.  Only a barbarian, ignorant of the qualities of great cuisine adds them to the pot!  :D   You can place them carefully beside the bowl of red, same with cornbread, rice, etc.  Only the pure elixer goes in the pot!

Unless you want it to be delicious....then add beans  :D  :P

 

I can't think of very many American foods that are more contested about how they are made. 

 

 

So, if you add beans to chili after it comes to the table it's ok? I just love these unwritten rules :D It's like white ankle socks for riding your bike.

What sort of beans do you use btw and how should they be prepared?

 

/R


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#58 Ivanhoe

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Posted 28 May 2015 - 0857 AM

Traditionally, kidney and pinto beans are used, though you can find a few recipes that use black beans.

 

Beans in chili is sort of like the Thirty Years War, only more heated.


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#59 PCallahan

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Posted 28 May 2015 - 2021 PM

Alright, I'm a late comer to this topic, but it is dear to my heart.  My office has a heavily-contested chili contest every year, featuring all sorts of chili (given that the staff comes from everywhere from Texas to Maine and beyond).  I won it this year with the following recipe; it doesn't sound that traditional, but actually came out that way.  I dubbed it "Memphis Backcountry Chili" (previous year I did "Five Critter Chili" and came in second place).

 

(Note that I don't put quantities in, except broadly.  I cook to taste, and guesswork is half the fun)

 

Start by lining the bottom of the pot with bacon (good, thick stuff), and then cover with diced sweet onions (Vidalias for preference).

 

Cook it down, then add a couple of pounds of ground venison.  Brown it good, stir it all up. 

 

Add a pound or so of ground Bison (no good reason other than I like it much better than beef).  Brown.

 

Dice up a couple of pounds of venison loin -- really small.  Add and brown.

 

Add the contents of a Carroll Shelby chili kit (really, the best available commercially) but DON'T add the chili powder.

 

Add chipotle powder to suit (lots of flavor, only moderate head, good for contests)

 

Add a ton of petite diced tomatoes.  Don't drain the cans first; the extra water is going to be necessary, because this stuff is going to cook for a while and you don't want it to dry out.

 

Add a cup or so of dark brown sugar.

 

Stew for a while.  Add corn starch/water mix to thicken as needed.

 

After everything is cooking together nicely, get a rack of hickory-smoked ribs (you do have a ready supply in the freezer, don't you?).  Cut them into individual ribs.   Dump them in.  Important Note:  Count the ribs!  Your going to need to pull the bones out later.  Don't use the end bit with the tiny bones, you can never find them all.

 

Cook on lowest heat for a couple of hours. 

 

Here's the controversial part.  I often add beans, not a ton, but usually a can each of light and dark pintos, maybe a third of brown beans, but I always add them late in the process, as I think they absorb too much flavor if you add them early.

 

Cook for a bit.  Then let cool overnight (I make chili in big quantities, so it can take six hours to really cool).

 

Next day, heat again, slowly and on low.  Cook for two or three hours, salt as need.  By this point, the meet should be all off the ribs, and the bones need to be fished out.  Remember when I said to count them?

 

Salt to taste, and serve with sour cream.

 

OK, so it is totally non-traditional, but the flavor is great.  And it seems the more you reheat it, the better it gets.  At the contest this year, I was roundly taunted by the traditional Texas chili makers, but the final came down to me and a Brazilian (who did a traditional Texas chili, but with Brazilian peppers and other spices)

 

Pat


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#60 DB

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Posted 12 June 2015 - 1847 PM

Every type of spicy stew is better on day two or three than it is on day one. it simply takes that long for the spices to settle into the other ingredients. That and the "relaxation" of the meat.


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