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Mint Vs Ubuntu Vs Fedora Vs Debian Vs Opensuse Vs Others


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#161 Murph

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Posted 18 November 2018 - 1334 PM

I don't know enough to say if systemd is causing issues with my Mint installation on my HP Spectre x360 system.  It seems solid enough.


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#162 Murph

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 1942 PM

I just looked and the fastest supercomputers in the world run Linux, mostly Red Hat Enterprise Linux.  It has been almost 20 years since I tried a Red Hat distro (Mandrake), is it any good?  


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#163 Ivanhoe

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 2006 PM

For enterprise servers, it is the gold standard. 


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#164 Murph

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 2032 PM

Is it like the Red Hat of yore, with .rpm and such?  I am afraid I have swung into the Debian camp, in that I really like apt and its resolution of dependency hell.  

For enterprise servers, it is the gold standard. 


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#165 TTK Ciar

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 2124 PM

Yes, it's still RPM-based, and yes the RPM database is still in multiple highly fragile BerkeleyDB files.

Otherwise, though, it's changed quite a bit from ye olde "Red Hat Linux" and its derivatives.

If you want to mess around with a free version, CentOS and ScientificLinux are the two main go-to distros, with CentOS being much more popular of the two. Both aim to be 100% compatible with RHEL, and do a pretty good job.

Edited by TTK Ciar, 20 November 2018 - 2124 PM.

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#166 Murph

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 2153 PM

I am thinking about it, I have an older laptop (used to be the spouse units), and it currently has Mint XFCE on it.  What about Fedora?

Yes, it's still RPM-based, and yes the RPM database is still in multiple highly fragile BerkeleyDB files.

Otherwise, though, it's changed quite a bit from ye olde "Red Hat Linux" and its derivatives.

If you want to mess around with a free version, CentOS and ScientificLinux are the two main go-to distros, with CentOS being much more popular of the two. Both aim to be 100% compatible with RHEL, and do a pretty good job.


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#167 CT96

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Posted 21 November 2018 - 0733 AM

As I mentioned way back on page 1, I think...

 

Fedora is a "bleeding edge" distro - you're constantly chasing the latest and greatest, and on a constant churn of updates... with a new version out every six months. Great if you want to be upgrading/rebuilding constantly for the new hotness. Not so good if you just want a stable system that works reliably. 

 

I got off the Fedora sprints and onto the CentOS marathon, and am now walking with the Ubuntu/Mint line.


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#168 Murph

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Posted 21 November 2018 - 0905 AM

Thanks. I want long term stability, not bleeding edge.
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#169 Murph

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Posted 21 November 2018 - 1300 PM

Thanks.  I re-read this post, and I wish there was a Red Hat equivalent to Mint.  It would tempt me to try it again

I lived in the Red Hat/Fedora/CentOS world for a LONG time. I still work extensively in it. In general, you can do the same thing with both. Where the Debian family has apt-get, the Red Hat family has yum, etc. 

 

My problem with the Red Hat line is this: You have to pay for Red Hat Enterprise, or get the CentOS free version of Enterprise - often several months or more out of date. Or you go for Fedora and are on the "bleeding edge" - and pay the upgrade/reinstall game every six months. 

 

To give you an idea, a few years ago we built some core services on a Fedora 14 box (I knew it was dumb at the time, but you win some battles, and lose other battles). Current state of the world is Fedora 26. Things we have developed since that deployment no longer work on such an old distro, and there is no good upgrade/update path to get that FC14 box to FC16. We can't have it out of production that long; and it is too integrated into the environment that it can't be readily migrated to a newer system (the hardware at this point is old as well). While a similar vintage deployment on Long Term Service distros have been more easily updated, and don't run out of support quickly. They may not be *as* up to date, but they are more stable.

 

For production these days I insist upon a long term service distro, be it Ubuntu LTSB, or CentOS. I don't really care which.

 

For home users... I have tried using all manner of distros for people of varying levels of computer skill. The only one I would give to my mother would be Mint, with the Cinnamon desktop. By and large, it just works. Yes, all the same dials are there, all the same under-the-hood configurations are there and can be set however a power user wants them - but to the basic user, it just works. It's arguably more intuitive than moving to Windows 10, and is a lighter weight OS (much less disk space, lighter RAM footprint, and the CPU isn't touched unless I'm actually DOING something). 

 

If I had to put my mother on a computer that I support remotely today, I would very likely put her on Mint. When push comes to shove (seeing as my father is currently managing all their IT support, and has been doing so since the 70s when we got our first computer) some day, I'll make the call based on the current state of the world. There's lots of opportunity for things to change. 

 

Dependency hell will be with us - in fact, as one who delves deep into things, it exists in Windows land and Mac world too. The user is just sheltered from it for the most part - or you wind up taking it to the experts who figure out how to resolve it. I believe, Murph, you are dealing with that on the other thread right now :-D It is the nature of computers - it's just most people have gotten used to the Windows or Mac quirks; and the Linux quirks are "new" (to them). 


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#170 TTK Ciar

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Posted 21 November 2018 - 1501 PM

I would suggest that the RH version of Mint is indeed Fedora.

On one hand, its packages do ride the ragged edge, but on the other hand RH is very responsive to bugs and security vulns, and provides patches promptly when a problem arises. They are unique among the Linux distribution maintainers in that they employ many professional engineers dedicated to supporting their product, some of them long-time OSS pioneers.

In many cases, when RH users depend crucially on a particular open-source project, RH will acquire the project in some way -- either by hiring the project devs to be RH employees and develop the project on company time, or by "sponsoring" the project, or by acquiring a company which provides support for that project (as they did with Cygnus Solutions in 2000).

If you are primarily interested in a home computer for use at home, I still recommend Mint, but for an office workstation which needs to integrate with corporate infrastructure and share commonly used business documents, Fedora is the way to go.
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#171 Murph

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Posted 22 November 2018 - 1145 AM

I thought about trying Cent OS 7.5, but saw that it is still showing the 3 series kernel which is not good for me.  If it was not for photoshop, iTunes, and some games, I would switch to linux 100%.  


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#172 TTK Ciar

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Posted 04 December 2018 - 1356 PM

I'm not trying to convince anyone to switch distributions, but this LQ thread took a turn which made me think of you guys: https://www.linuxque...are-4175643511/
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#173 Murph

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 0645 AM

Good read.  I am nowhere near ready to tackle Slackware.  Slackware is for the the Linux gods, and wizards.  

I'm not trying to convince anyone to switch distributions, but this LQ thread took a turn which made me think of you guys: https://www.linuxque...are-4175643511/


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#174 Murph

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Posted 02 January 2019 - 0656 AM

Just installed Linux Mint on my daughters old laptop (she got a new one for Christmas), and it works.  Some strange hiccups, but it seems to be working fine.  I did not realize it had a Realtek card.  It had a little screen glitch that cleared up right away, Loaded right up, I did not have to tweak BIOS at all. I am booting it right now, and while it takes longer than my little HP. I cannot see my 5g network, but I could not under windows. It did find the 2.4 ghz network with no issues. HTOP is running just fine, it is just slower than my i7 HP Spectre laptop. But the HP has an NVME drive.
 

 

From inxi -b:

[email protected]:~$ inxi -b
System:
Host: murph-HP-Notebook Kernel: 4.15.0-43-generic x86_64 bits: 64 
Desktop: Cinnamon 4.0.8 Distro: Linux Mint 19.1 Tessa 
Machine:
Type: Laptop System: Hewlett-Packard product: HP Notebook 
v: Type1ProductConfigId serial: <root required> 
Mobo: Hewlett-Packard model: 80CB v: 99.41 serial: <root required> 
UEFI [Legacy]: Insyde v: F.1B date: 09/10/2015 
Battery:
ID-1: BAT1 charge: 35.6 Wh condition: 38.4/38.3 Wh (100%) 
CPU:
Quad Core: AMD A8-7410 APU with AMD Radeon R5 Graphics type: MCP 
speed: 998 MHz min/max: 1000/2200 MHz 
Graphics:
Device-1: AMD Mullins [Radeon R4/R5 Graphics] driver: radeon v: kernel 
Display: x11 server: X.Org 1.19.6 driver: ati,radeon 
unloaded: fbdev,modesetting,vesa resolution: 1920x1080~60Hz 
OpenGL: renderer: AMD MULLINS (DRM 2.50.0 / 4.15.0-43-generic LLVM 6.0.0) 
v: 4.5 Mesa 18.0.5 
Network:
Device-1: Realtek RTL8723BE PCIe Wireless Network Adapter 
driver: rtl8723be 
Device-2: Realtek RTL8101/2/6E PCI Express Fast/Gigabit Ethernet 
driver: r8169 
Drives:
Local Storage: total: 256.17 GiB used: 8.71 GiB (3.4%) 
Info:
Processes: 197 Uptime: 11m Memory: 4.80 GiB used: 764.1 MiB (15.5%) 
Shell: bash inxi: 3.0.27


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#175 DB

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Posted 09 January 2019 - 0850 AM

That wifi part number only supports 2.4, so you've got what you've got, if you see what I mean.
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#176 Murph

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Posted 10 January 2019 - 0656 AM

That wifi part number only supports 2.4, so you've got what you've got, if you see what I mean.

I do, which is fine, it is just wonky right now.  I am sitting next to the Wifi router and only get 70% strength!  I am less than impressed with this laptop compared to the little Spectre x360 which just seems to work.  


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#177 Murph

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Posted 05 February 2019 - 0705 AM

Well, I ditched Linux, re-installed Windows since Mint kept having WiFi issues.  So I am going to give the laptop to my brother in law who does not have a computer.  On a different front, I installed the 4.18 Kernel on my Mint installation.  It runs fine, no issues so far, but since it is not a LTS Kernel, I need to roll it back, but do not know how to do that.  On the Mint forum they told me to boot to GRUB, and I was told hold "Shift" as it is booting, and select Advanced.  Any suggestions after that?  I don't want to zorch my system since I have it running well.


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