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Recovered Warbirds Thread


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#61 JasonJ

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 2150 PM

When it comes to restored Japanese birds, from the little I have seen on the web, I have found the groups that handle them to be quite professional. As Shep854 said, its expensive. Japanese have restored a number of things to sitting condition but the only thing I can think of that can actually move that they restored was a Type 89 tank. Although I have seen some comments saying things like "they restore too much", they being not just US but also Russia and such. Also flying without the correct engine seems to turn down the opinions by some here. So some may be bothered a little if a G4M is flying with modern engines installed as that would fail to preserve it as what it was. Well could be a bit nitpicky. Probably nothing wrong with having both worlds, some restored as best as possible to what it literally was, and have some restored to flying (or driving) condition if is sacrificing a little of the originality to gain a chance for others to experience seeing it flying as opposed to just sitting. But sometimes I think having them in a flying condition risk them being taken too much as toy things or stopping short at just national pride feeling without careful thinking about the fuller context of them. But yet having them flying could be a better at getting attention and thus more able to get people by their own interests on a path towards better understanding of the fuller context.

 

Just don't feature the G4Ms in a PH 2001 kind of movie ;)


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#62 shep854

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 2342 PM

By restoring to a taxi-worthy condition, the British seem to have found an acceptable medium for some aircraft.

Edited by shep854, 04 January 2019 - 2342 PM.

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#63 DB

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 0956 AM

The Bagington Shackleton and East Kirkby Lancaster are examples.  

 

They both face essentially insurmountable hurdles to airworthiness level restoration because of administrative obstacles based (in the Shackleton's case at least) on nominal lifing of critical components, plus the absence of a formal relationship with a Design Authority..

 

The Shackleton has a time expired main spar.


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#64 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 1051 AM

The BBMF Lancaster had the same issue. The Main spar on that was life expired, so they had to figure out how to do a replacement. As it happens, the MOD had envisaged replacing the main spar on AWACs Shackletons, so they had some appropriate aluminum ingots to do the work. It remain the only Lancaster that has been re-sparred.

 

Speaking of the East Kirkby Lancaster, they are making some really interesting videos on the restoration for returning it to flight.

 

The same people are also slowly restoring (reconstructing?) a Handley Page Hampden with the intention of returning it to flight. Which is kind of getting into the same territory a restoration of the Betty would be. You are getting more into the realms of the Dunkirk Spitfire, 2 rudder pedals and an engine, than a restoration.


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#65 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 1058 AM

When it comes to restored Japanese birds, from the little I have seen on the web, I have found the groups that handle them to be quite professional. As Shep854 said, its expensive. Japanese have restored a number of things to sitting condition but the only thing I can think of that can actually move that they restored was a Type 89 tank. Although I have seen some comments saying things like "they restore too much", they being not just US but also Russia and such. Also flying without the correct engine seems to turn down the opinions by some here. So some may be bothered a little if a G4M is flying with modern engines installed as that would fail to preserve it as what it was. Well could be a bit nitpicky. Probably nothing wrong with having both worlds, some restored as best as possible to what it literally was, and have some restored to flying (or driving) condition if is sacrificing a little of the originality to gain a chance for others to experience seeing it flying as opposed to just sitting. But sometimes I think having them in a flying condition risk them being taken too much as toy things or stopping short at just national pride feeling without careful thinking about the fuller context of them. But yet having them flying could be a better at getting attention and thus more able to get people by their own interests on a path towards better understanding of the fuller context.

 

Just don't feature the G4Ms in a PH 2001 kind of movie ;)

 

There was an interesting feature on the 3 Zeros that were restored to flying condition in Russia that I watched on youtube. Apparently they ordered them not to fit engines so the owners who bought them could make their own decision on it. I believe they fitted Pratt and Whitney's,not because they couldnt fit original japanese engines, but because of the difficulty of obtaining parts of them, not to mention maintenance issues. The last person who knew how to flight maintain a zero retired in 1945.

 

Ive read of one pilot who had his Buchon fitted with a DB601. He regretted it, he had an engine that was slightly less powerful than a Merlin, with more regular servicing and harder to obtain parts. It sounded absolutely awesome, but....

 

Im still waiting for 'Yamato vs Godzilla'. Im sure they could feature a flying Betty in that. :)


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#66 JasonJ

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 2126 PM

Maybe they could feature HMS Vanguard too because if already going as far as Yamato vs Godzilla, why not? :D


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#67 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 0313 AM

Good Lord, can you imagine the RN wanting to fight lizards with their shiny new toy?  They would be frightened about scuffing the paintwork. :)


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#68 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 1015 AM

This sounds like fun.

 

http://warbirdsnews....y-8th-2020.html

With the 75th anniversary of the end of WWII in Europe approaching just a little over a year away in May, 2020, the first official press release announcing the Arsenal of Democracy Fly-Over of Washington, DC to commemorate this historic milestone came on January 7th. This event will closely model itself on the similar and highly successful Arsenal of Democracy Fly-Over which took place on May 8th, 2015 to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of WWII. Indeed, most of the same entities, and many of the same personnel will be involved organizing and executing this major fly past of the nation’s capital. However, unlike last time, there will also be special celebrations at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from August 29th through September 2nd, 2020 to commemorate the cessation of hostilities in the Pacific Theatre as well.


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#69 shep854

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 1201 PM

End of an era-- 'Last airworthy military version'...I'm pretty sure there are a few others still flying, but last flights always tug at my heart...


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#70 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 1225 PM

Well its an NF14, so its probably Amstrong Whitworth one. Id be crying buckets if it was a real Gloster built one. :D

 

Im not sure, Martin Baker were using a 2 seat one for tests (Ive a feeling it was in an episode of The Prisoner) but ive a feeling thats been withdrawn too. Im sure we will see one back in the skies sooner or later, even if they have to reengine them. After all, none of us thought an ME262 would be seen in the skies again either.


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#71 shep854

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 1409 PM

At first I thought it may have been finally retiring from RAF service, but that wasnt actually stated.
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