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#61 R011

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 0007 AM

Also, that style of armour does little or nothing to protect against modern SSM. You cant use enough to keep a big shaped charge out, it doesnt protect the electronics without which the ship is useless, and missles tend to top attack which bypasses the armour altogether.
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#62 Markus Becker

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 0844 AM

I remember reading about the hit percent of high caliber naval artillery - it was about 5%. Moreover, those shells were really expensive, more than a 1930's airplane, for instance. 

 

You are referring to main battery guns of battleships? AFAIK 5% would have been a very, very good hit rate in the pre-radar age when shooting at other ships. 

Another cost factor were the barrels. I remember a 16" gun which had a barrel life shoter than the ship's magazine capacity. I think it was the US 16"/50 from around 1920 that were given to the Army when the WNT stopped battleship construction. 


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#63 sunday

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 1120 AM

 

I remember reading about the hit percent of high caliber naval artillery - it was about 5%. Moreover, those shells were really expensive, more than a 1930's airplane, for instance. 

 

You are referring to main battery guns of battleships? AFAIK 5% would have been a very, very good hit rate in the pre-radar age when shooting at other ships. 

Another cost factor were the barrels. I remember a 16" gun which had a barrel life shoter than the ship's magazine capacity. I think it was the US 16"/50 from around 1920 that were given to the Army when the WNT stopped battleship construction. 

 

 

Yes, talking about what I remember, but without checking sources. My bad.

 

Italian 38 cm guns of Littorios were notorious by their short life.


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#64 Markus Becker

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 1750 PM

 
Yes, talking about what I remember, but without checking sources. My bad.
 

 
No problme. I looked it up in Friedman's BB and couldn't find that passage. His other relevant book about fire control I didn't even touch. It make the first an easy read by comparison. 

PS: My impression that 5% is very good is based on information from another form. I actually don't recall any book giving such data.

Edited by Markus Becker, 12 January 2019 - 1808 PM.

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#65 DougRichards

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 2136 PM

I found this whilst researching another thread.  Is worth reading:

 

http://www.armouredc...captains-report


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#66 JWB

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Posted 17 January 2019 - 1339 PM

I found this whilst researching another thread.  Is worth reading:

 

http://www.armouredc...captains-report

Very much so.


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#67 DougRichards

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 1843 PM

 

I found this whilst researching another thread.  Is worth reading:

 

http://www.armouredc...captains-report

Very much so.

 

 

I would love to read comments written by a USN Captain.

 

Some of the other notes on that site were interesting, including the following observation:

 

Victorious’ 832 Squadron Albacores had flown off the carrier on January 1, 1943, and landed at Norfolk Naval Air Station. Here the biplanes became the object of much derision. Send Her Victorious notes that it was somewhat fortunate that the FAA aircrew’s practice of strapping bicycles to the wing struts as personal shore transport had been skipped for this occasion.


Edited by DougRichards, 18 January 2019 - 1856 PM.

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#68 JWB

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 1215 PM

 

 

I found this whilst researching another thread.  Is worth reading:

 

http://www.armouredc...captains-report

Very much so.

 

 

I would love to read comments written by a USN Captain.

 

Some of the other notes on that site were interesting, including the following observation:

 

Victorious’ 832 Squadron Albacores had flown off the carrier on January 1, 1943, and landed at Norfolk Naval Air Station. Here the biplanes became the object of much derision. Send Her Victorious notes that it was somewhat fortunate that the FAA aircrew’s practice of strapping bicycles to the wing struts as personal shore transport had been skipped for this occasion.

 

:lol:


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#69 Panzermann

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 1241 PM

 

 

 

I found this whilst researching another thread.  Is worth reading:

 

http://www.armouredc...captains-report

Very much so.

 

 

I would love to read comments written by a USN Captain.

 

Some of the other notes on that site were interesting, including the following observation:

 

Victorious’ 832 Squadron Albacores had flown off the carrier on January 1, 1943, and landed at Norfolk Naval Air Station. Here the biplanes became the object of much derision. Send Her Victorious notes that it was somewhat fortunate that the FAA aircrew’s practice of strapping bicycles to the wing struts as personal shore transport had been skipped for this occasion.

 

:lol:

 

 

Air Mech Assault! Now that is progressive thinking on part of the RN pilots!


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#70 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 1359 PM

Take that Sparky! :)


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#71 DougRichards

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 1756 PM

Unfortunately there are few good models of the 1/72 Applecore available, I built a poor resin kit some decades ago, but a little scene of an Applecore with bicycles on either wing would be cute.  There are 1/48 Applecores available, but few Royal Navy bicycles in 1/48.  I am presuming that there was a standard Fleet Air Arm bicycle of course.


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#72 shep854

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 2240 PM

Unfortunately there are few good models of the 1/72 Applecore available, I built a poor resin kit some decades ago, but a little scene of an Applecore with bicycles on either wing would be cute.  There are 1/48 Applecores available, but few Royal Navy bicycles in 1/48.  I am presuming that there was a standard Fleet Air Arm bicycle of course.


Nice nickname. :)
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