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Flight Tj610 Crashed In The Sea.

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#21 Roman Alymov

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 1431 PM

https://www.easa.eur...erations-europe


Grounded in Europe now.

Looks like reply to Dieselgate scandal.


Edited by Roman Alymov, 12 March 2019 - 1431 PM.

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#22 Panzermann

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 1529 PM

 

https://www.easa.eur...erations-europe


Grounded in Europe now.

Looks like reply to Dieselgate scandal.

 

 

another hypthesis I have just read is, that this is the return for the Huawei affair with the USA trying to mob other countries into not using Huawei. yet another saw the opportunity for Airbus, but Airbus is at its manufacture limits. Really the only comparable offering avaiable for most airlines for buying is the 737-8 and-9 at teh moment. russian and chinese are also rans and do not necessarily adhere to the requitred standards. Not that the 737 was adhering either. The 737 is legendary for its collection of exceptions and grandfathered certifications.

 

 

Really the max8 is like a hot rod.


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#23 RETAC21

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 1540 PM

 

 

https://www.easa.eur...erations-europe


Grounded in Europe now.

Looks like reply to Dieselgate scandal.

 

 

another hypthesis I have just read is, that this is the return for the Huawei affair with the USA trying to mob other countries into not using Huawei. yet another saw the opportunity for Airbus, but Airbus is at its manufacture limits. Really the only comparable offering avaiable for most airlines for buying is the 737-8 and-9 at teh moment. russian and chinese are also rans and do not necessarily adhere to the requitred standards. Not that the 737 was adhering either. The 737 is legendary for its collection of exceptions and grandfathered certifications.

 

 

Really the max8 is like a hot rod.

 

 

If they are willing to accept a little inefficiency, airlines can go with Embraer too. 


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#24 Panzermann

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 1604 PM

If they are willing to accept a little inefficiency, airlines can go with Embraer too.

 

The whole point of the Max8 is the better engines and thus fuel efficiency.

 

 

 

There is also The Bombardier C-series which unbeknownst to me is now markteted as A220 by Airbus :wacko: But that is also a bit smaller than the 737MAX. And I doubt Embraer could deliver the numbers that Boeing can, when Airbus is already struggling to fill orders.


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#25 RETAC21

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 1606 PM

It's time to roll out the A-380SP!


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#26 Panzermann

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 1608 PM

It's time to roll out the A-380SP!

 

 

Washed too hot and it shrank? :lol:


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#27 BansheeOne

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 1610 PM

I wonder why they've kept pumping up the 737 rather than developing more versions of the 757 as their other narrowbody. Of course the latter has been dead for some time now, supposedly to be replaced along with the 767 by the future 797 midbody.


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#28 sunday

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 1700 PM

I wonder why they've kept pumping up the 737 rather than developing more versions of the 757 as their other narrowbody. Of course the latter has been dead for some time now, supposedly to be replaced along with the 767 by the future 797 midbody.

 

Airlines stopped buying it, and Boeing needed another 737 manufacturing line. So like Douglas did with the DC-8 in order to manufacture DC-10s, Boeing converted the 757 line in a 737 one.

 

https://www.business...nie-2016-5?IR=T


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#29 DB

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 1724 PM

 

https://www.easa.eur...erations-europe


Grounded in Europe now.

Looks like reply to Dieselgate scandal.

 

Does that apply to China, too?

 

And Canada, Australia and nearly every other country that seems to be run by adults.


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#30 R011

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 1758 PM


 


https://www.easa.eur...erations-europe


Grounded in Europe now.

Looks like reply to Dieselgate scandal.
 
Does that apply to China, too?
 
And Canada, Australia and nearly every other country that seems to be run by adults.

Not Canada. We are keeping the Max8 flying here.
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#31 DB

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 1830 PM

I just came back here to retract that bit, sorry. Take India instead.


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#32 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 0335 AM

It's time to roll out the A-380SP!

 

LMAO. :D


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#33 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 0339 AM

I wonder why they've kept pumping up the 737 rather than developing more versions of the 757 as their other narrowbody. Of course the latter has been dead for some time now, supposedly to be replaced along with the 767 by the future 797 midbody.

 

I wonder why they are sticking with the 737, and not pimping new versions of the MD80, which Boeing were building for some time as the 717. Id have thought you would have room for far bigger engines  on an MD80 airframe than you can fit under the 737 wing.

 

Is this the first Boeing offing that features a FBW system? I am just wondering if this is A320itis, that the real problem is not the aircraft, its the pilots still trying to fly it as if its a legacy aircraft.


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#34 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 0508 AM

Reports on CNN by a whole slew of US pilots complaining of major pitch downs whilst the aircraft is in autopilot just after take off.

 

And the FAA say there isnt a problem? They have turned too much into an outstation of Boeing, or so it seems.


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#35 JasonJ

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 0524 AM

A PDF report filing a complaint about the pitchingdown nose in November 2018.

https://assets.docum...or-737-max8.pdf

 

Found it via link in this article. Among content about the complaints, says that on Tuesday, Ted Cruz said the planes should be grounded.

https://www.dallasne...ted-safety-flaw


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#36 Murph

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 0551 AM

Sounds like Boeing is in full damage control mode.


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#37 Panzermann

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 0740 AM

Reports on CNN by a whole slew of US pilots complaining of major pitch downs whilst the aircraft is in autopilot just after take off.

 

And the FAA say there isnt a problem? They have turned too much into an outstation of Boeing, or so it seems.

 

Who is the boss of the FAA and who got a six digit donation from a certain oregonian aircraft manufacturer? America First!

 

 

the MD-80 aka Boeing 717 is NIH. Sales were going down as well (I guess mostly because the future plans for the MD-90 models were not going to be realized) and it was competing with Boeing's own 737 sales. So it was dropped.

 

 

 

Sounds like Boeing is in full damage control mode.

 

Of course they are. Bad image does not sell aeroplanes.


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#38 BansheeOne

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 1005 AM

Does that apply to China, too?
 
And Canada, Australia and nearly every other country that seems to be run by adults.


I'm usually Mr. Rational, but I do note that many of those who were quick to ground the type, like the Europeans and Chinese, have recently been pissed off by the current US adminstration's attempts at economic warfare by Twitter against them. In the case of Brazil, there has been bad blood about the Boeing-Embraer tie-up, though not necessarily by the current government.

Maybe it's because I read Michael Chrichton's "Airframe" just recently. While it's obvious he had several big chips on his shoulder, I find his description of trial by media of the aircraft industry pretty accurate. Only some weeks ago after Airbus' decision to stop production of the A380, local media called the type the blunder of the century, driven by egomanical hubris, etc. Now they're going similarly overboard by calling the Max 8 a misconstruction, talking of fear of flying due to the "horror crashes", and so on.

At the very least I have the reasonable suspicion that the alternating frenzies are happily fed by lobbyists for Boeing and Airbus respectively, á la Chrichton. For Airbus the current drama would certainly be sweet revenge for the long "if it's not Boeing I ain't going"-style badmouthing of their aircraft as computer-guided flying deathtraps after similar incidents (see Air France 447, etc.).

Ethiopian Airlines now reportedly sending the black boxes to "a European country" rather than the US as would be usual is easily interpreted as distrust of an American investigation, following criticism of the FAA's "failure" to ground the type, convenient media reports about a cozy relationship between Boeing and the US government, etc.; note that after Airbus incidents there have frequently been suggestions by the Boeing camp of the French covering up evidence for technical causes.

Edited by BansheeOne, 13 March 2019 - 1007 AM.

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#39 R011

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 1120 AM

I just came back here to retract that bit, sorry. Take India instead.


Just a bit early. The Transport Minister announced this morning that Canada was grounding the Max8 due to "new data" - probably polling data rather than technical.
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#40 Panzermann

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 1157 AM

 

Does that apply to China, too?
 
And Canada, Australia and nearly every other country that seems to be run by adults.


I'm usually Mr. Rational, but I do note that many of those who were quick to ground the type, like the Europeans and Chinese, have recently been pissed off by the current US adminstration's attempts at economic warfare by Twitter against them. In the case of Brazil, there has been bad blood about the Boeing-Embraer tie-up, though not necessarily by the current government.

Maybe it's because I read Michael Chrichton's "Airframe" just recently. While it's obvious he had several big chips on his shoulder, I find his description of trial by media of the aircraft industry pretty accurate. Only some weeks ago after Airbus' decision to stop production of the A380, local media called the type the blunder of the century, driven by egomanical hubris, etc. Now they're going similarly overboard by calling the Max 8 a misconstruction, talking of fear of flying due to the "horror crashes", and so on.

 


Anything to sell the newspaper (or website). SCANDAAAAAAAL! OUTRAAAAGOUS! :(

 

 

Though considereing the seats in a 737MAX, a 757 would be the better base to build from, but that line is long closed and so they made the 737 fit.
 

At the very least I have the reasonable suspicion that the alternating frenzies are happily fed by lobbyists for Boeing and Airbus respectively, á la Chrichton. For Airbus the current drama would certainly be sweet revenge for the long "if it's not Boeing I ain't going"-style badmouthing of their aircraft as computer-guided flying deathtraps after similar incidents (see Air France 447, etc.)

 
Ironically it looks like the MCAS is suspected as one of the failure points together with the pilots making mistakes. So congratiulations Boeing, your smearing comes back to bite your behind.
 
The 737MAXis not a death trap, but with the accidents that have happened grounding adn a throrough investigation is the way to go.
 
 
 

Ethiopian Airlines now reportedly sending the black boxes to "a European country" rather than the US as would be usual is easily interpreted as distrust of an American investigation, following criticism of the FAA's "failure" to ground the type, convenient media reports about a cozy relationship between Boeing and the US government, etc.; note that after Airbus incidents there have frequently been suggestions by the Boeing camp of the French covering up evidence for technical causes.

 
FAA has a habit of not grounding aeroplanes on every suspicion. Europe is more cautious. But in the end the FAA seems to be as neutral as needs to be to do its job.


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