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#1 Tommy Bennett

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 1139 AM

I've always been a big fan of scones and have made them off and on for about 30 years. I find that they are best after sitting around for a day cooling. Anybody got something interesting? I did a search on google for ideas, but whether any of the hundreds of recipes are worth a damn, I have no clue. Mine is pretty simple:

4 cups of flour
4-5 tablespoons sugar
4 teapoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup of butter (room temp. not cold)
1 1/3 cups half & half (buttermilk if you have it)
2 eggs
1-2 cups of raisins (I go with the higher end)

Preheat oven to 425*F. Combine 1st four ingredients in bowl, mix. Blend in the butter. Mix milk product and eggs separately. Add raisins and wet mix to the rest. Finished product should be kneaded on a floured surface. Place blobs of dough 3/4" thick, sizes may be varied, on a well-greased cookie sheet.

The flavor is fairly mild, highlighted by the bits of raisin. I'm looking for something to maybe spruce up the flavor a bit without overwhelming the original essence.
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#2 Dame Karmen

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Posted 04 February 2008 - 1633 PM

Thanks for posting that recipe Tommy ... I'll give it a try one day soon :)

My Mom always used to make fried scones when she made bread and if I
remember correctly, she just sliced off bits of the bread dough once it was
raised and pan fried the bits. I absolutely love scones!!!

(nothing better than the smell of fresh baking bread and the taste of it hot
out of the oven and smothered in butter ... then when cooled ... yum. Who needs
more than just butter, I say? :D
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#3 Dame Karmen

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Posted 04 February 2008 - 1635 PM

Oops ... sorry ... I see you are talking about oven baked scones ... which I love too, with raisins!!! Mom used to make those too and they were great, but I don't know her recipe.
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#4 Tommy Bennett

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Posted 06 February 2008 - 1112 AM

Oops ... sorry ... I see you are talking about oven baked scones ... which I love too, with raisins!!! Mom used to make those too and they were great, but I don't know her recipe.


One bit I forgot when relating the recipe. Place aluminum foil over the cookie sheet and grease that, rather than the sheet. Less tendency for the bottom of the scones to overcook like burnt toast!

Get that recipe if you can, I'm keen on trying other people's creations, even if its just a variant on mine.
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#5 mikegolf

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Posted 06 February 2008 - 1126 AM

One investment I have found that is worth it's weight in gold for baking is an insulated cookie sheet. The bottom of things like scones and biscuits never burns. A little more expensive than a run of the mill sheet, but worth the extra $.

Though I am a grizzled old tanker, I can get down in the kitchen.
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#6 Dame Karmen

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Posted 06 February 2008 - 1651 PM

I forgot to mention that my all time favorite scones (and muffins)
are BLUEBERRY ones !!!

Thanks for the tips for preventing burning bottoms, guys ;)

Tommy, I can't ask Mom about her recipe as she passed away in 1989
but maybe next time I talk to my sister, she might know. My sisters all
are (were) great breadmakers too and may remember if they make scones
sometimes too ... I'll post if I get a recipe.

They are all great, back home, at making bannock too :D
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#7 Tommy Bennett

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Posted 07 February 2008 - 1024 AM

I forgot to mention that my all time favorite scones (and muffins)
are BLUEBERRY ones !!!

Thanks for the tips for preventing burning bottoms, guys ;)

Tommy, I can't ask Mom about her recipe as she passed away in 1989
but maybe next time I talk to my sister, she might know. My sisters all
are (were) great breadmakers too and may remember if they make scones
sometimes too ... I'll post if I get a recipe.

They are all great, back home, at making bannock too :D

Dude, anything you can dig up in the bread family will be more than welcome. I'm game to try any recipe, and as with books, I only go on recommendations like this before I invest my time. Thanks in advance.

By-the-by, that bannock you mentioned, is that weybread or oatmeal cakes or something? My memory banks are struggling tho I know I've had it. I believe it's Scottish, n'est ce pas?.

MG, thanks for the insulated cookie sheet recommendation, I wasn't aware they existed.
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#8 Dame Karmen

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Posted 07 February 2008 - 1813 PM

Dude, anything you can dig up in the bread family will be more than welcome. I'm game to try any recipe, and as with books, I only go on recommendations like this before I invest my time. Thanks in advance.

By-the-by, that bannock you mentioned, is that weybread or oatmeal cakes or something? My memory banks are struggling tho I know I've had it. I believe it's Scottish, n'est ce pas?.


Hi Tommy,

Bannock ... yes, as far as I understand the original bannock idea was taken from Scotland (oats bannocks?) and improvised upon this side of the great waters :D I googled for bannock recipes and interestingly found a BC govt site with some bannock recipes and also interesting bits of history bits regards Native Indians/Aboriginals since colonization. Bannock history and importantance is interesting (I think so! :D ) Interesting the many recipes variations and actual ways of cooking bannock at home or at a firepit/campfire ;)

Anyways, here is the link, recipes all down the right hand side of the page, aboriginal history bits all down the left, for those interested to read them:

http://www.for.gov.b...rsi/fnb/FNB.htm

I'll post other recipes for "breads" type things when I come across them, for you to check out.

Dame ;)
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#9 Dame Karmen

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Posted 07 February 2008 - 1814 PM

PS: Here are wiki writeups for bannock ;)

http://en.wikipedia..../Bannock_(food)
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#10 BP

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 1148 AM

Gawd I love a good, firm, not too sweet traditional scone. My MIL makes some killer ones- I must have had four as I drove from Richmond to DC this past summer.

I guess the cakey Starbucks types are good if you have a sweet tooth or haven't had better, but abominations as far as scones go.
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#11 Dame Karmen

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 1843 PM

Gawd I love a good, firm, not too sweet traditional scone. My MIL makes some killer ones- I must have had four as I drove from Richmond to DC this past summer.


Will your MIL share her recipe for you to share with us all? :D
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#12 Tommy Bennett

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 1147 AM

Hi Tommy,

Bannock ... yes, as far as I understand the original bannock idea was taken from Scotland (oats bannocks?) and improvised upon this side of the great waters :D I googled for bannock recipes and interestingly found a BC govt site with some bannock recipes and also interesting bits of history bits regards Native Indians/Aboriginals since colonization. Bannock history and importantance is interesting (I think so! :D ) Interesting the many recipes variations and actual ways of cooking bannock at home or at a firepit/campfire ;)

Anyways, here is the link, recipes all down the right hand side of the page, aboriginal history bits all down the left, for those interested to read them:

http://www.for.gov.b...rsi/fnb/FNB.htm

I'll post other recipes for "breads" type things when I come across them, for you to check out.

Dame ;)

Excellent site! Bannock is close enough to my scone recipe that I think I might actually produce something edible. ;)

Anything else you come across online or word-of-mouth, just post it here and I'll check in from time to time. Cheers!
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#13 Tommy Bennett

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 1156 AM

Gawd I love a good, firm, not too sweet traditional scone. My MIL makes some killer ones- I must have had four as I drove from Richmond to DC this past summer.

I guess the cakey Starbucks types are good if you have a sweet tooth or haven't had better, but abominations as far as scones go.

They have 3-packs of "scones" at the local supermarket, but they sorta fall more into the donuty family of abominations as far as consistancy, sweetness & flavor. I also like mine solid, subtle, rustic and oveny, if that makes any sense. :blink:
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#14 DougRichards

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 0725 AM

Soft scones with jam and cream - in the afternoon - luvely!

My grandmother (maternal, paternal grandmother was great at greasy roasts for Sunday lunch) made scones that were more like rock cakes - in that you had to quarry them rather than split them for the jam and cream, more or less 'take your pick' (and shovel).

But something that are big here, at least in some places - are pumpkin scones - the wife of a former right wing state premier (think US state govenor) was famous for hers.

I made some once by the simple expedient of mixiung in some canned pumpkin (of more use in pumpkin pies than anything else) with the scone dough.

Were well received at a 'bush dance' at our church.

Edited by DougRichards, 10 February 2008 - 0726 AM.

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#15 Tommy Bennett

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 1303 PM

Pumpkin flavoring has found its way into everything these days, even Dunkin Donuts. I blame it on Harry Potter! :)
I've enjoyed a few baked goods with it and the canned filling is easy to get at the local supermarket as their baking aisle is pretty full. I'll give it a go.
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#16 Dame Karmen

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 1850 PM

Excellent site! Bannock is close enough to my scone recipe that I think I might actually produce something edible. ;)

Anything else you come across online or word-of-mouth, just post it here and I'll check in from time to time. Cheers!


I had lots of bannock growing up :) Basic oven done. Am considered Metis through my
ancestry via the furtrade days and bannock a favorite back home, still.

Will do, regards if I find more recipes, will post for you Tommy :)
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#17 BP

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 0941 AM

T I also like mine solid, subtle, rustic and oveny, if that makes any sense. :blink:


Makes total sense. They have the consistency, depth of taste and "mouthfeel" that is so pleasing. Being Murrican, I prefer coffee with my scones, but any way they make a perfect breakfast for me.
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#18 Tommy Bennett

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 0930 AM

Makes total sense. They have the consistency, depth of taste and "mouthfeel" that is so pleasing. Being Murrican, I prefer coffee with my scones, but any way they make a perfect breakfast for me.

Then I'm not completely round the bend.

I also drink coffee. I can drink tea - usually only at Asian restaurants - but given the choice, its Jamocha. Normal Columbian coffee bean flavor. I walk into places like Starbucks and get confused.
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#19 Harold Jones

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 1938 PM

The Lord willing and the creek don't rise I'm going to do a batch of scones using this recipe.

Ingredients:
1/2 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
1/4 lb plain flour
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/4 lb wheatened flour
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 oz butter or margarine
A little milk
1 tablespoon caster sugar

Method:
Sieve the plain flour and add the other dry ingredients Rub in the butter and add enough milk to form a soft consistency. Roll out on a floured board to 3/4 inch thick. Cut in rounds of 2 inches and bake in oven. Gas 6, 200 degrees C (400 F) for 12 to 15 minutes or until lightly browned.

Regarding coffee at Starbucks I just order a large coffee, occasionally I have to clarify and say coffee of the day, but mostly the folks behind the register can figure it out.
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#20 SCFalken

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Posted 02 March 2008 - 0101 AM

Mmmmmm....Potato Scones.....



Falken
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