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The Unnoticed Immigrant Food


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#21 Colin

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 1035 AM

I love Vietnamese food. We have a couple decent places in Miami. Miss Saigon being the best IMO. There is also a hole in the wall on Calle 8 called Hy-Vong that has great great food. Sadly the service is so bad and the waits so long, that I almost never go. My wife is obsessed with their soups.

 

I would nominate Venezuelan food to the list. Clearly the influence in Miami is growing, but NYC also has its good share of new places together with old classics like Caracas Arepa Bar. On TV I've seen several places serving Venezuelan food being featured all over the US.

 

Has anyone here tried it?

My brief experience of Venezuelan cuisine made me wonder if you all took cooking lessons from the British. The truckstop sold that little bread pocket stuffed with processed meat immersed in a mayonnaise like substance that had been exposed to day time temperatures and likely a haven for billions of bacteria, then there was the cassava bread pizzas. Of course the working man's lunch of fried chicken with pasta and fries. Then who can forget the lovely undercooked fish in beautiful Cidud Bolivar. The bright spark was the Bakery in Esmeralda on the Brazil/Venezuelan which smelled wonderful and my brother and I stocked up on lovely baked goods. Also the cook at my brothers camp was a real chef and produced the best food I had the whole time I was in the country.     


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#22 Harold Jones

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 1834 PM

I'm a huge fan of Peruvian rotisserie chicken.   I first came across it a few years ago when I was attending some training outside of Baltimore.  Shortly after I got back this place opened https://lapolleria.com/ fortunately it's far enough from the house that I don't go there every day.


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#23 shootER5

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 2142 PM

[quote=Murph]True, but where are the Korean joints? 

[quote=shootER5], on 06 Jul 2014 - 4:14 PM, said:snapback.png

There are a surprising number of Korean places here.  I tried one a few weeks ago and liked it a lot.  I was surprised that the side dishes (kimchee and such) were served cold, but enjoyed every bite.

 

And, Murph, the big reason for all the Indian places in an around the Medical Center is because of USAA. ;)

 

 

There's at least one off Marbach, another at either Rittiman or Eisenhauer and 35, another off Harry Wurzbach north of the Fort Sam gate, and one in a shopping center off DeZavala and Vance Jackson.

I know there are more that I'm forgetting...


Edited by shootER5, 08 July 2014 - 2142 PM.

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#24 Juan Sosa

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 0938 AM

 

My brief experience of Venezuelan cuisine made me wonder if you all took cooking lessons from the British. The truckstop sold that little bread pocket stuffed with processed meat immersed in a mayonnaise like substance that had been exposed to day time temperatures and likely a haven for billions of bacteria, then there was the cassava bread pizzas. Of course the working man's lunch of fried chicken with pasta and fries. Then who can forget the lovely undercooked fish in beautiful Cidud Bolivar. The bright spark was the Bakery in Esmeralda on the Brazil/Venezuelan which smelled wonderful and my brother and I stocked up on lovely baked goods. Also the cook at my brothers camp was a real chef and produced the best food I had the whole time I was in the country.     

 

 

Those sound like horrible experiences. If I remember correctly you were there in the 90's. Sadly that is not outside of what you can expect if you depend on road side food and most  restaurants now days. Proper home made meals, good areperas and good restaurants are still awesome, but the country's deterioration has had a big impact in the food culture.

 

Luckily many good cooks have immigrated to the US and Canada. Now you can get proper Venezuelan food in North America. May it make up for your bad experiences when you were there.


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#25 Juan Sosa

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 0950 AM

I'm a huge fan of Peruvian rotisserie chicken.   I first came across it a few years ago when I was attending some training outside of Baltimore.  Shortly after I got back this place opened https://lapolleria.com/ fortunately it's far enough from the house that I don't go there every day.

 

Peruvian food is insane. Probably the best cuisine in South America and in my top 10 for the World. The chicken is something else, but it goes way beyond ceviche and rotisserie.


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#26 Colin

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 1252 PM

Yes it was 1994 and I was not on the tourist route, but in the nitty gritty of mining country

 

https://www.google.c...407,4316m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m2!3m1!1s0x8dc74e292e071737:0x3d2f5aeb2250f729

 

7353951.jpg


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#27 Juan Sosa

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 0720 AM

Wow, that is truly in the middle of nowhere. How long did you stay there for?


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#28 Colin

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 1033 AM

Just for a month, then went to the coast at Cumana via Guyana City and wandered around,then to Merida (I liked it) Where I got caught by the national airline going bankrupt and the bus system going on strike. 12 of us hired Por Pesta's to take us to Caracas. That was quite the 24hr adventure! Spent almost no time in the Capital.

 

The country made me sad, it has so much potential and so much going for it, it could be a real powerhouse, rather than a circus. Corruption had such a tight stranglehold on the country. When Chavez took over I thought, maybe he can do better, I was so very, very wrong.


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#29 Juan Sosa

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 1547 PM

Caracas was an awesome place to visit if you had locals to take you out and guide you. Not a pretty town, but lots of stuff to do. Now it is not worth going if they paid you.

 

Merida and the Andes in general are awesome. My favorite region by far. Great people, food and views.

 

What you said reflects the self image of Venezuelans: if it weren't for the corruption it would be an awesome country. Sadly the reality is that Venezuelan society is rotten to the core. All institutions are broken and even if you took the chavistas away overnight, it would take a couple generations to rebuild.

 

There is still some awesome food if you know where to get it.


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#30 Mr King

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 2034 PM

This ones for Tomas. Hipster American douchebags try Filipino street food with the expected reactions. 

 


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#31 bojan

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 0511 AM

Recently, on mini-vacation in Montenegro, I have seen some hippy shit (UK I would say, mid-20s) scream on top of his lungs on the stuff how his vegetarian meal was prepared in same kitchen as meat products... :wacko:


Edited by bojan, 27 August 2014 - 0519 AM.

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#32 Murph

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 0903 AM

Must.Have.Indian.Food....   Ok, going back to Bombay Hall for lunch.  I took the girls for lunch and supper, and the result was predictable.  Victoria turned her nose up at everything except the Tandoori chicken, and the salad.  Refused to eat anything else, and not much of that, ended up getting her something later so she had some food.  Sarah, on the other hand, dove in, and afterwards complained that she was "soooo full".  She practically wallowed in the fresh, hot Naan bread.  She loved the rice, Chicken Vindaloo, meatballs, and pakoras.  She keeps wanting to go back, Victoria would rather eat at Sonic or Whataburger....  She said that the chicken tastes like Lupe's Chicken guisado, and cannot eat enough of it (for Sarah).  I must remember to try the mango lassi today.  I was not suprised at Victoria, she is ultra-picky about food, and after the concussion has really been funny about food and tastes. 

 

 


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#33 Colin

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 1038 AM

dosa, the other Indian food

 

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#34 Murph

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 1316 PM

Whoa!  What is that thing?  It looks like the burrito that ate Chicago!   Just got back from Bombay Hall, and I am almost overwhelmed with great food.  The chicken tika massala was amazing, as was everything else.  I need a nap, a long one....

dosa, the other Indian food

 

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#35 Colin

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 1451 PM

Heaven on earth it is. This is a "paper dosa" with no filling, the regular one is a tad thicker and is filled with curry.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dosa


Edited by Colin, 05 September 2014 - 1451 PM.

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#36 Harold Jones

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 1514 PM

My favorite is a masala dosa and a generous helping of coconut chutney.  If you want to try making your own dosas a lot of Indian grocery stores sell the batter already made.


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#37 Mr King

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Posted 05 September 2014 - 1758 PM

I have not had any Indian food since starting a diet in March. It is the only thing I truly miss. 


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#38 DB

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 1955 PM

Check out some recipes for some of the more common Indian style sauces - you'll be surprised how they are often made with stuff that it actually good for you and not particularly fattening.

 

The "creaminess" comes from slow reduction of a tomato sauce (skinned, de-seeded) with cumin and coriander, which act as thickeners.

 

Don't despair! Not everything that looks like it has a million calories does. Just control the portion sizes and don't have rice *and* naan.


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#39 Colin

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 2116 PM

We also replace coconut milk with yoghurt 


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#40 Mr King

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 1749 PM

Found a Caribbean ethnic grocery store purely by happenstance today. I have wanted to try Caribbean, specifically Jamaican, for quite some time now.  Browsed the nice ladies selection, and came home with some hot Jamaican yellow curry powder. For lunch I usually eat a bowl of homemade Cincinnati style chili, and I like to throw a spoon full of Madras yellow curry powder in it when I heat it up. The Jamaican style yellow curry made a really nice change up, and added a nice tinge of heat. 


Edited by Mr King, 18 September 2014 - 1749 PM.

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