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#2281 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted Yesterday, 04:30 AM

A documentary I recall from my youth, on the Somerset and Dorset Railway. One of the most regretted of the Beeching Cuts.

 


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#2282 sunday

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Posted Yesterday, 05:20 AM

Yeah, they used the same technique at least as late as the 1970's. Old carriages with a flat roof fitted, and you would walk along fitting the wire. It worked fairly well.
(...)
 
Yes, the Southend video is a good one. I THINK this was a 1500V system, which is what BR was fitting in the 1950's before they descovered the advantages of 25AC like the rest of Europe. The catenary is the same model as they used on woodhead, and they also supplied it to Australia, where its still in use carrying 25AC.
 
We never stuck with 1500V, though I believe in holland they did, and procured a number of locos built in this country designed to work over woodhead, also 1500V.


According to the insulating elements, it looks like 1500V. I think that kind of OHL is always laid using manual labor. There is a more modern video:


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#2283 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted Yesterday, 06:39 AM

Supposedly when British Railways developed this catenary system for Woodhead, they went WAY overboard in developing different components that were not in the event used. The theory at the time was that it was a prototype for a system they planned to use UK wide, though in the event it was just used in Woodhead/manchester area, and Southend. Though as said, it was used in Australia and I believe a similar if not identical system was used in South Africa, so it seems to have been on the counter for Commonwealth nations.

 

Here is the same system at use on Woodhead. Ironically most of this (including the 'new' tunnel you see here) was abandoned in 1981. Cost too much to convert to 25AC, and  the coal traffic that used it was already declining.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, Yesterday, 06:39 AM.

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#2284 Panzermann

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Posted Yesterday, 06:46 AM

Meanwhile the rails in Karlsruhe are so bent out of shape because of the temperatures, that trians have to drive really slow or are being replaced by busses.

 

 

How do railsways in southern Spain or Italy cope with high temperatures?


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#2285 sunday

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Posted Yesterday, 07:06 AM

Meanwhile the rails in Karlsruhe are so bent out of shape because of the temperatures, that trians have to drive really slow or are being replaced by busses.

 

 

How do railsways in southern Spain or Italy cope with high temperatures?

 

Easy, they are stressed for higher maximum temperatures, and probably the temperature variation during one year is smaller. In Northern Europe I think they unbolt the rails from the sleepers twice a year to remove thermal stresses.


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#2286 sunday

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Posted Yesterday, 07:10 AM

Supposedly when British Railways developed this catenary system for Woodhead, they went WAY overboard in developing different components that were not in the event used. The theory at the time was that it was a prototype for a system they planned to use UK wide, though in the event it was just used in Woodhead/manchester area, and Southend. Though as said, it was used in Australia and I believe a similar if not identical system was used in South Africa, so it seems to have been on the counter for Commonwealth nations.

 

Here is the same system at use on Woodhead. Ironically most of this (including the 'new' tunnel you see here) was abandoned in 1981. Cost too much to convert to 25AC, and  the coal traffic that used it was already declining.

(...)

 

When one develops a new catenary system, one needs to consider all possibilities of use, so it is better to design all ancillary equipment at once.


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#2287 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted Yesterday, 07:11 AM

It set them in good stead for the next 2 or 3 catenary systems we developed. So it clearly wasnt a waste.


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#2288 Markus Becker

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Posted Yesterday, 11:05 AM

Meanwhile the rails in Karlsruhe are so bent out of shape because of the temperatures, that trians have to drive really slow or are being replaced by busses.

 

 

How do railsways in southern Spain or Italy cope with high temperatures?

 

 

Huh? Only the history steam railway Molli is in the news with such problems. Strange or do they too have welded rails? Re: Karlsruhe. The lower Rhine valley is one of the 'hottest' places in Germany. 


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