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best steaks ever

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#21 BP

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 0926 AM

I like the spirit of continuous experimentation, documentation and sharing.

 

But boiled steaks. .  .you may as well become English or something. I can't be a part of such perversions. Steaks need a char.

 

Heathens.


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#22 Ivanhoe

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 1140 AM

Well, in the spirit of the above haditha, I too am a Heathen-American.

 

I have found that chuck eye steaks sauteed in butter* and given a decent amount of caramelization at the end are a very practical and affordable way to enjoy dead cow when one lives in the 2nd floor of a firetrap building.

 

To be clear, real out-of-the cow butter, clarified.


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#23 sunday

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 1248 PM

I like the spirit of continuous experimentation, documentation and sharing.

 

But boiled steaks. .  .you may as well become English or something. I can't be a part of such perversions. Steaks need a char.

 

Heathens.

 

Nobody expects the Barbecuish Inquisition!  :D

 

However, one could say that sous vide does not boil meat, as temperature does not reach boiling point of water.


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#24 Harold Jones

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 1913 PM

I like the spirit of continuous experimentation, documentation and sharing.
 
But boiled steaks. .  .you may as well become English or something. I can't be a part of such perversions. Steaks need a char.
 
Heathens.



Char is easily applied. Smoking hot cast iron skillet, super hot cast iron grate on my big green egg or by use of a kitchen torch.
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#25 CT96

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Posted 28 January 2017 - 2149 PM

I like the spirit of continuous experimentation, documentation and sharing.

 

But boiled steaks. .  .you may as well become English or something. I can't be a part of such perversions. Steaks need a char.

 

Heathens.

I would never serve a steak without browning it first. Boiled? Boiled? Shirley you jest. Boiling it would be FAR past "well done". I would never willingly murder such a fine piece of beef.  


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#26 BP

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 0904 AM

This is you people:

 


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#27 Ivanhoe

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 1303 PM

I guess we know what BP does on 3-day weekends...

 

inquisition.jpg


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#28 BP

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 1451 PM

I guess we know what BP does on 3-day weekends...

 

inquisition.jpg

 

My chief weapon is surprise!... Surprise and tongs... tongs and surprise... My two weapons are tongs and surprise... and ruthless efficiency with sea salt and fresh pepper! My three weapons are tongs, and surprise, and ruthless efficiency with salt and pepper... and an almost fanatical devotion to the coals... My four... no... Amongst my weapons... Hmf... Amongst my weaponry... are such elements as tongs, surpr... I'll come in again.


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#29 sunday

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 1553 PM

...and we only met once!


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#30 CT96

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Posted 29 January 2017 - 1842 PM

My new Sous Vide setup:

20170129_170901_zpsty0kwopl.jpg

 

Chuck Roast vacu-sealed and in the path for 48 (47.5?) hours. 

20170129_170930_zpsc932dqiw.jpg

 

The roast and the liquid that came out of it (I used that liquid to make gravy for the roast).

20170129_171634_zpsldfet06b.jpg

 

browned and partially cut:

20170129_172124_zpswibbwawi.jpg

 

and fully cut:

20170129_173821_zpsno3iotpn.jpg

 

 

Next time I'll try a marinade, and/or smoke it prior to cooking. I have leftovers for at least a few days this week (this last pic is actually taken after dinner.


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#31 DB

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 1652 PM

I've never cooked sous-vide, but one of the best fall-apart-at-a-touch beef joints I ever cooked was a cheap cut, smothered in whole grain mustard, sealed in cling film/plastic wrap and cooked in the oven for as long as it took at the minimum electric fan oven temperature. Somewhere between 60 and 75 C, I think (140-170 F).

 

Apart from the slight risk of taking up something nasty from the plastic (and it's food grade after all), I doubt that the end result differed much from a similar time in a sous-vide bath at similar temperatures.


Edited by DB, 06 February 2017 - 1652 PM.

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#32 CT96

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Posted 11 February 2017 - 2237 PM

The name of the game, physics wise, is the precision temperature control. It is very easy to achieve with water, much more difficult with other means - but certainly achievable. Air is a poor medium for conducting heat energy, so your oven set at 350F will eventually get your meat up to 140F... but to get the center up to 140F you push the exterior up to 180, and then you have a gradient from the core at 140 to the surface at 180 (while the oven is pumping out 350). 

 

With Sous Vide you are using a very good temperature conductor, water. You set the water temperature to 140, and it brings everything in the bath up to 140. The center of the meat is 140. The surface of the meat is 140. Everything in between is 140. Pasteurization of beef at 140 takes about 12 min. Breakdown of connective collagen starts at about 130. Longer cooking "tenderizes" or "softens" the meat. The Tenderloin I made tonight was a perfect 140 through and through. A quick brown to get the Maillard reaction umami flavor added, cut into medallions, and served. It was 140 through and through, with just a little bit ever seeing temps higher than that - and then only very briefly.

 

If you cooked your brisket in a 140F oven, aside from it taking a LONG time to get into the safe range (bacterial growth is fastest just before the kill temps start at 130), it would eventually reach equilibrium with the air temp and have much the same effect. I can take a cold or even frozen cut of meat and get it through the "danger zone" (40F to 130F) in a very short time, and get it to safe to consume in not terribly much longer (it takes about 45 min to pasteurize beef at 130, 12 min at 140, 2 min at 150 and instant at 160 - caveat, check the tables for hard numbers); so anything above the minimum safe cooking time/temp is about desired consistency of the resultant cook. Whatever method you use to get it there matters little, so long as it is a safe and effective method.

 

This weekend's experiment is a half pork shoulder, with a Brown Sugar BBQ marinade (Wegmans prep), cooking for 18-24 hours at 160F. It's been in for about 3 hours, so it is (I think) safe to consume already, but I want it fall-apart tender, which needs another 15 hours to reach. 

 

I found a good inexpensive source for full Beef Brisket, so that will be one of my future cooks (working on putting together a good dry rub and/or marinade for it - and I've got enough meat cooked or cooking to last me another week or two). 


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#33 CT96

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Posted 12 February 2017 - 2231 PM

Pork Shoulder came out of the Sous Vide at 22hrs. I drained it, dried the surface, and put on a brown sugar based BBQ rub and put it in the oven at 300 for an hour to put a good crust on it. Pulled it from the oven, and then used a pair of forks to pull it to shreds. Even without the smoke it is FANTASTIC. It's like meat candy.


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#34 CT96

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 2057 PM

Did a mass produced Corned Beef Brisket point at 160 for 36hrs. It was AMAZING. Gonna have to clear out the store of all the "Discounted" corned beef briskets tomorrow. I think I'm ready to move onto doing "ordinary" brisket myself.

 

I've taken to double-bagging my long cooks... vacu-seal (with double end seals) the meat, then place in zip-lock with water to fill any voids. This puts the holding/handling stress on the ziplock, which if it fails is no big issue. IF the vacu-seals fail (only ever had that happen once, and only when pulling it out of the bath), then very little water from the ziplock intrudes; and the bath as a whole is not contaminated (nor is the food irrevocably wrecked). 


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#35 sunday

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 1024 AM

Very interesting reading (and tasty eating, I suppose!)


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#36 Harold Jones

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 1229 PM

Very interesting reading (and tasty eating, I suppose!)

you can try some if you ever actually book tickets.   ;)


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#37 CT96

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 1829 PM

tickets available here: https://www.amazon.c...01HHWSV1S?psc=1

 

:D


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#38 sunday

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 0307 AM

:ph34r:  :D


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#39 Corinthian

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 1944 PM

 


 

Nobody expects the Barbecuish Inquisition!  :D

 

However, one could say that sous vide does not boil meat, as temperature does not reach boiling point of water.

 

 

Many many many years ago, there was a thread on steaks that devolved into a flame war. It involved Ray Manning who IIRC held the position that if one puts gravy on a steak, it means the steak wasn't good at all, that a steak was prepared and cooked right if it didn't need any gravy.


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#40 CT96

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 1541 PM

Good steak can stand on it's own with just a little salt. I love Gravy, but it has no place on a steak. Sauces are most often about covering the fact that the meat is bad. 


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