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Heinkel 219 Recovered Off Denmark.


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#21 DB

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 1557 PM

Try the Shuttleworth collection, Stuart.

 

http://www.shuttlewo...the-collection/



#22 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 0634 AM

Do they got as far as building entirely new engines? Id not heard that.

 

Here is the Jackson website. They build a variety of WW1 RAF engines, as well building an Oberursel, the engine that powered the Fokker Triplane. Wonderful engineering to look at.

http://thevintageavi...e-build-history



#23 DougRichards

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 1432 PM

I think that was just the wooden structure. Most of the sub components (undercart, engines, radiator) I think they had from a donor aircraft, or so the Haynes book on the Mosquito (which is actually particularly good) has suggested. I dont doubt you COULD make it entirely from scratch, sans the engines. But im not sure the unit price would be worth it minus an actual history.

 

Maybe thats why the Flugwerke FW190s dont seem to have been a financial success, lacking a combat history they lack the value that make production of them viable. Dont know.

 

 

And sometimes more radical (or should that be 'radial') solutions are found:

 

https://daniel-wales...adial-705788457

 

The Fighter Collection's Hawker Sea Fury T.20 has been grounded for around half a decade now due to problems with the Bristol Centaurus powerplant, an engine very well known for being temperamental. Clearly frustrated with these issues and wanting their beautiful machine back in the skies, it seems the collection have decided to opt for the instalment of a Pratt & Whitney R-2800, a conversion that many Sea Fury operators around the globe have chosen for continued reliability. A good reliable solution and one that has kept many Furies and Sea Furies operating successfully. However for those of us that truly love this mighty Hawker built monster, the conversion comes at the price of loosing something quintessential to the machine, it's truly wonderful silky smooth grumble as it rips the sky apart, and that fantastically potent looking five blade prop that just screams power.

I am lead to believe that the conversion is only a temporary measure, and once a solution to their Centaurus issues is found, she will once again become the machine she should be. However I cannot deny that even a Pratt and Whitney Fury is better than a grounded Fury. After all, there's nothing particularly wrong with the converted Furies, they are beautiful machines as are their British powered counterparts. It's just that once you've seen and heard a Centaurus Fury, you understand entirely why some operators are willing to go through the hassle to operating on them.



#24 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 0149 AM

There is something about a Bristol designed power-plant. Capricious they might have been, but they just have a sound all of their own.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 06 October 2017 - 0152 AM.


#25 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 0152 AM

Speaking of Hawker aircraft, the Hawker Typhoon might yet return to British skies too.

http://hawkertyphoon...ect/background/



#26 DB

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 0839 AM

When I was working briefly with the UK MOD's project team responsible for the maintenance of the Royal Naval Historic Flight, a major barrier to getting the aircraft flying again was the re-certification requirement. As their own aircraft was on the military register, the Military Aviation Authority required that the aircraft meet the requirements applicable to all in-service aircraft.

 

There were some technical issues that needed a deal of wriggling to fit (such as on-board, real-time fatigue monitoring of critical structures), but what really caused the problem was the absence of design and maintenance authorities (i.e. companies with current licences) to support major overhaul activities.

 

The best Centaurus rebuilder is a US based company that supports unlimited racing aircraft. there is no way on earth that they would go through the kind of certification that, say, Rolls Royce goes through to qualify as a DA. or MA. (DAOS/MAOS if you must look them up).

 

The only practicable solution is to re-list the aircraft as civilian and run them with a "Permit to Fly" - which is vaguely similar to the US concept of "Experimental Aircraft".



#27 JWB

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 1133 AM



#28 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 1148 AM

When I was working briefly with the UK MOD's project team responsible for the maintenance of the Royal Naval Historic Flight, a major barrier to getting the aircraft flying again was the re-certification requirement. As their own aircraft was on the military register, the Military Aviation Authority required that the aircraft meet the requirements applicable to all in-service aircraft.

 

There were some technical issues that needed a deal of wriggling to fit (such as on-board, real-time fatigue monitoring of critical structures), but what really caused the problem was the absence of design and maintenance authorities (i.e. companies with current licences) to support major overhaul activities.

 

The best Centaurus rebuilder is a US based company that supports unlimited racing aircraft. there is no way on earth that they would go through the kind of certification that, say, Rolls Royce goes through to qualify as a DA. or MA. (DAOS/MAOS if you must look them up).

 

The only practicable solution is to re-list the aircraft as civilian and run them with a "Permit to Fly" - which is vaguely similar to the US concept of "Experimental Aircraft".

I was just reading about the sole remaining flyable A20 in the United States, and they had a similar problem. There is nobody left to rebuild the Pratt and Whitneys in it. As it was, they were able to trace the last remaining engine stands to rebuild them on, otherwise they might have been sunk.  it turned out, nobody was left to certify the pilot to fly it. The best he could do was read the flight manual, and take off and hope for the best. 

 

Im told the only reason why there isnt an EE lightning flying in this country isnt that they cant get it to fly. There just isnt anyone willing to certificate it. Im amazed they are able to get a Canberra certified actually.



#29 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 1150 AM

Hampden making nice progress.

http://www.warbirdsn...nal-flight.html



#30 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 1157 AM

And a Short Stirling turns up in the north sea.

http://www.edp24.co....h-sea-1-5165921



#31 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 1204 PM

Few more photos. Doesnt seem to be much thats recoverable, even if they were allowed to. I still hold out hope for the one lying off Peenemunde.

http://sas.raf38grou...opic.php?t=2562



#32 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 1137 AM

Hampden AE436, recovered from a crashsite in Sweden in 1976. Astonishingly this is apparently one of 2 that is being restored to flight.

http://www.forcedlan...F024-AE436.html



#33 mattblack

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 0016 AM

You should spend the next few days watching Kermit Weeks's restoration and flight videos on his YouTube channel.

#34 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 0153 AM

Thanks, Ill look that up. He is often mentioned in Flypast Magazine, going back about 2 decades.






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