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European Armies at Gettysburg ?


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#261 Rich

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 1322 PM


oh, and any info on how turreted Rams got into the Netherlands and were abandoned there after the war is appreciated, i thought only kangaroos were used on the Western front...

 

 

They were RAM OP's, quite a few were issued to the Field Regiments RA and to the RHA Regiments.


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#262 R011

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 2104 PM

The four brigades of Rams in England had to go somewhere and not all that many of them were converted to APCs and OPVs.  Canada didn;t want to bother moving them back across the Atlantic and the reformed Dutch Army needed tanks.  Quite a few, if not all remaining, were re-gunned to 75 mm from 6 pdr.


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#263 Stefan Fredriksson

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 0309 AM

This is why I still stay on TN, topics like this.
Question: which is the "best" book about the ACW? I like books with maps and explanations why things happened, and relatively easy read since I am an amateur in the ACW.

 
McPherson's Battle Cry of Freedom is still one of the best political-military overviews at the strategic and operational level, but he often fails quite badly when it comes to tactical details. Dupuy and Dupuy's Compact History of the Civil War remains one of the best single-volume military histories, but I may be prejudiced since I edited the second edition. :P  Brent Nosworthy's Bloody Crucible of Courage is, with minor caveats, the best single-volume study on how the armies fought and maneuvered.
 
After that it gets complicated. :D
Looking at library here I found none of the above, but they have "The American civil war" by John Keegan (2009), and "The history of the American civil war" by Philip Katcher (2000). Guess I will start there.
Surprisingly I found a promising book written by a Swede as well (Thomas Sörensen, 2016), and one about Swedes during the ACW, "Svenskarna under stjärnbaneret" (Swedes under the starspangled banner) by Alf Åberg, 1994.

Edited by Stefan Fredriksson, 14 January 2018 - 0343 AM.

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#264 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 0317 AM

 

 

Now that you mention... this blog does a good job explaining your last: http://coldwargamer....group-1-br.html

 

Yeah, nice website that actually.

 

Im sure ive read somewhere, that in the 1950s, there was even a Dutch plan to open the Dykes. The logic was, we would do our heroic death or glory thing on the Rhine, retire, and the Dutch would open the dykes. I think that strategy became somewhat moot as Soviet Tactical nuclear weapons came into play (after all, the Soviets could flood holland before we retreated through it) but it does highlight what was a purely defensive strategy from an early point.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This was called the "Ijssellinie". The plan was indeed to inundate a line so that defending armies could retire behind the inundations. The crucial dykeheads making the inundation possible were very ligthly (and cheaply) defended: basically some Sherman and Ram (with turrets) hulls were encased in concrete, all internal stuff removed and used as "independent" bunkers for a small crew and minimal accomodation. Only armament in the original turrets was an MG. Just behind these "strongpoints" of gutted tanks were some Bofors guns in concrete emplacements to protect them from air attack. How the Dutch got hold of turreted RAMs is a riddle to me. The plan was apparently abandoned when the Bundeswehr was becoming an integral part of NATO defensive strategy and the NATO defensive area moved eastwards beyond the Rhine region. (working from memory)

 

 

greetings,

 

Inhapi.

 

oh, and any info on how turreted Rams got into the Netherlands and were abandoned there after the war is appreciated, i thought only kangaroos were used on the Western front...

 

 

Unless they gutted them whilst they were in the Netherlands in front line workshops? Just an idle thought.

 

Thanks for that, there was something about this on a Cold War Website many years ago, but I had forgot most of the details.


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#265 Rich

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 1224 PM

 

 

This is why I still stay on TN, topics like this.
Question: which is the "best" book about the ACW? I like books with maps and explanations why things happened, and relatively easy read since I am an amateur in the ACW.

 
McPherson's Battle Cry of Freedom is still one of the best political-military overviews at the strategic and operational level, but he often fails quite badly when it comes to tactical details. Dupuy and Dupuy's Compact History of the Civil War remains one of the best single-volume military histories, but I may be prejudiced since I edited the second edition. :P  Brent Nosworthy's Bloody Crucible of Courage is, with minor caveats, the best single-volume study on how the armies fought and maneuvered.
 
After that it gets complicated. :D
Looking at library here I found none of the above, but they have "The American civil war" by John Keegan (2009), and "The history of the American civil war" by Philip Katcher (2000). Guess I will start there.
Surprisingly I found a promising book written by a Swede as well (Thomas Sörensen, 2016), and one about Swedes during the ACW, "Svenskarna under stjärnbaneret" (Swedes under the starspangled banner) by Alf Åberg, 1994.

 

 

I can never recommend Keegan for his accuracy or the depth of his research, but his writing style was impeccable. :D  Katcher I have not read, but he has an excellent reputation. The others sound interesting, but I suspect I would need a translator. :D


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#266 Stefan Fredriksson

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 1240 PM

Quick search for reviews of the books say exactly that.

I think the Swedish ones wont bring anything new, intended for those like me who has limited knowledge.
I'll try to remember to report after reading.
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