Jump to content


Photo

Cold War At Sea


  • Please log in to reply
77 replies to this topic

#61 Paul Lakowski

Paul Lakowski

    Man of the worldly means

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,782 posts

Posted 04 May 2019 - 1551 PM

Don't want to disrupt this great thread, but I watched a move PHANTOM, recently . While it had a curios plot, I wondered if the tactics and chatter of these soviet submariners sounds right or would it be closer to what a NATO submarine would sound like or do.


  • 0

#62 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 58,982 posts

Posted 06 May 2019 - 0149 AM

Its a fun film. I think they had the interplay between the characters broadly accurate for that period. OTOH, I think the last film anyone made that got submarine warfare was right was 'Das Boot'. Hunt for Red October was fun, but it was played around with a lot from the original book.


  • 0

#63 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 58,982 posts

Posted 14 May 2019 - 0414 AM

Interview with Stephen Coonts on the A6 Intruder.

https://www.fighterp...7-a-6-intruder/


  • 0

#64 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 58,982 posts

Posted 15 May 2019 - 0209 AM

Documentary on HMS Repulse on patrol in 1985.


  • 0

#65 shep854

shep854

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,677 posts

Posted 19 May 2019 - 2008 PM

The dive on the Family Day seemed to be a bit tense for the visitors.


  • 0

#66 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 58,982 posts

Posted 18 June 2019 - 0904 AM

Aircrew Interview with Hillary 'Toro' O'Connor Mueri, Tomcat D Riow who deployed in 2003 to air support over Iraq. Well worth listening to, the story in part 2 where she meets one of the guys she saved is just plain spooky.

 

 
  • 0

#67 RETAC21

RETAC21

    A la lealtad y al valor

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14,342 posts

Posted 27 May 2020 - 0809 AM

Interesting, a look at Soviet/Russian submarine propellers

 

 https://imgur.com/a/t6UjU#OPaQB0G


  • 0

#68 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 58,982 posts

Posted 27 May 2020 - 0843 AM

Thanks, thats truly interesting.

 

I really miss the Typhoons, it feels a very faux cold war without them. :(


  • 0

#69 RETAC21

RETAC21

    A la lealtad y al valor

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14,342 posts

Posted 17 June 2020 - 0551 AM

Who would have thought it?

SOSUS vs Type XXI

 

http://www.iusscaa.o...type_xxi_ss.htm


  • 0

#70 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 58,982 posts

Posted 17 June 2020 - 0554 AM

Tony Williams really should have put that in his alternative history novel. :D


  • 0

#71 RETAC21

RETAC21

    A la lealtad y al valor

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14,342 posts

Posted 21 June 2020 - 0559 AM

The post that complements Soviet sub screws: US subs screws

 

https://imgur.com/a/IQBOi


  • 0

#72 Ken Estes

Ken Estes

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,000 posts

Posted 24 June 2020 - 0137 AM

Also a great piece of nostalgia for US subs from the fleet boats to present day.


  • 0

#73 Josh

Josh

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14,981 posts

Posted 24 June 2020 - 0801 AM

The post that complements Soviet sub screws: US subs screws

 

https://imgur.com/a/IQBOi

 

Wow, I'm surprised how revealing a lot of those photos were. Though I'm also surprised at how far back the seven blade skewback design that has become the global norm was adopted by the USN and largely standardized across the fleet. Wasn't aware that modern pump jets still used seven blades nor had I realized there was an 'anular skewback' blade set up on some modern LAs. I've never seen the 6" countermeasure launchers displayed before either; it is noticeable that they were added to fins on the LA class (I think as a late upgrade, but possibly original to the last production boats) where as VA's must mount them somewhere on the hull. A lot to learn in those pictures; surprised some of the more recent ones were released.


  • 0

#74 RETAC21

RETAC21

    A la lealtad y al valor

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14,342 posts

Posted 24 June 2020 - 0828 AM

I guess that over time, the principles were well known and the main secret was how to manufacture them, but even that would be easy now with CAD. Some more:

 

One in an odd place, the former Agosta class boat Ouessant was sold to Malaysia and now it's a museum there:

 

agosta-class-submarine-malacca-3.jpg

 

 

Le Redoutable, also a museum ship:

 

TluRTxPo7wYsfNeQoFUBsA0bqVI92Ylk6XIZcv2N


Edited by RETAC21, 24 June 2020 - 0844 AM.

  • 0

#75 Josh

Josh

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14,981 posts

Posted 25 June 2020 - 0108 AM

In retrospect, the seven blade skew back configuration was bound to be copied. I had no idea that the USN nailed that configuration back in the 60's. The LA class had sharper tips, but then the LA class is widely rumored to have sacrificed, or at least not improved on, quieting compared the the Sturgeons for the sake of speed. But I had no idea that the first seven bladed boats dated back to the 60's; that is incredible. Obviously that was classified at the time. But still amazing that the USN nailed that configuration down so early.


  • 0

#76 RETAC21

RETAC21

    A la lealtad y al valor

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14,342 posts

Posted 25 June 2020 - 0236 AM

In retrospect, the seven blade skew back configuration was bound to be copied. I had no idea that the USN nailed that configuration back in the 60's. The LA class had sharper tips, but then the LA class is widely rumored to have sacrificed, or at least not improved on, quieting compared the the Sturgeons for the sake of speed. But I had no idea that the first seven bladed boats dated back to the 60's; that is incredible. Obviously that was classified at the time. But still amazing that the USN nailed that configuration down so early.

 

I think it came out as a result of how easy it was to track the early SSBNs using SOSUS, with George Washington being tracked all the way across the Atlantic in her first deployment, but I have seen papers from the Royal Navy pointing out that US boats were noisier than their own (speaking about Guppy boats). This would have woken Navy leadership to the danger, as the first SOSUS array were in the Caribbean and the Soviets could have gotten a clue and start using Cuba for this (they didn't)


  • 0

#77 Josh

Josh

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14,981 posts

Posted 25 June 2020 - 1325 PM

The Carribean is a lot more shallow than the Atlantic. I think SOSUS relied on deep water sound phenomenon that would not have worked in the Carrib. Most of it it pretty shallow outside of the Tongue of Sea, and that place was wired up for surround sound at a very early stage in USN submarine development so Soviet boats likely didn't want to tread there.


  • 0

#78 Brian Kennedy

Brian Kennedy

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 5,626 posts

Posted 26 June 2020 - 1055 AM

This thread is fascinating as [email protected]! Thanks guys
  • 0