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Battleships At D-Day

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#61 Delta tank 6

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 0835 AM

https://en.wikipedia...inking_of_Corry

Discrepancy over the sinking of Corry

The official loss of ship report for Corry states that at 06:33 she hit a mine, which was said to have exploded below her engineering spaces.[4]Initial reports by the commanding officer, however, state that Corry was sunk by a salvo of heavy caliber projectiles which detonated amidships below the water level in the engineering spaces and caused the breaking in half and sinking of the vessel.[5] German reports also state that the Saint Marcouf (Crisbecq) battery commanded by Walter Ohmsen, located 1 12 miles (2.4 km) inland, with its three 210-millimeter (8.25 in) guns scored a direct hit on an American warship at approximately H-Hour (0630), causing its sinking. The warship was initially believed to be a light cruiser (due to Corry's silhouette resembling that of a light cruiser at a distance).[6] About two weeks after D-Day, a detailed report stating that heavy artillery fire had sunk Corry was about to be submitted as the official loss of ship report, but it was suddenly scrapped and rewritten stating that Corry had struck a mine. No officers or crew were consulted for input on the rewrite of the report. This final official loss report for Corry stated on its last page that shelling received simultaneously with the proposed mine resulted in "merely incidental damage".


Ken,

Why would the US Navy change the cause from heavy caliber shell to mine??

Mike
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#62 Ken Estes

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 1837 PM

[Pure Conjecture] Somehow, it's more innocent to fall victim to a concealed menace than one wielded by the Wehrmacht from shore positions that simply outshot the USN? After all, it's mid-1944 and every JA island garrison was being swept aside or buried.

 

Again, continental phib ops remained starkly different than the Pacific island assaults. Sicily, Salerno, and Omaha each had sticking points. At Juno-Sword, advance units of the 21st PzDiv actually showed up at the beach on the evening of D-Day. Ike was correct in assuming that he needed five landing beaches, so that he could lose one if it proved that tough.


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#63 MiloMorai

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 1952 PM

50c1a4aa2b.jpg
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#64 Ken Estes

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 2001 PM

Indeed. Thanks, Milo.


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#65 rmgill

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 0437 AM

On the subject of Naval Gunfire, didn't 21st Panzer get close enough to the beach to be directly engaged by some of the warships? 


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#66 MiloMorai

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 0923 AM

21st Panzer on D-day

https://weaponsandwa...ay-1944-part-i/
https://weaponsandwa...y-1944-part-ii/

"At 2000 hours, the mechanised infantry of I Battalion, Panzer Grenadier Regiment 192, reached the sea between Lion-sur-Mer and Luc-sur-Mer, a few miles to the west, and linked up with the Germans still holding the coast there.
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#67 Tim the Tank Nut

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 0933 AM

that map is a stark reminder of the importance of Caen.

Any German forces that moved towards the beach weren't there any more at least


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#68 Ken Estes

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 1212 PM

21st Panzer on D-day

https://weaponsandwa...ay-1944-part-i/
https://weaponsandwa...y-1944-part-ii/

"At 2000 hours, the mechanised infantry of I Battalion, Panzer Grenadier Regiment 192, reached the sea between Lion-sur-Mer and Luc-sur-Mer, a few miles to the west, and linked up with the Germans still holding the coast there.

 

I don't recall them holding very long and the Allied troops already landed had little trouble showing them the way back.


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#69 MiloMorai

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 1348 PM

Who said they did? It was an answer to rmgill's question.
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#70 Ken Estes

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 1918 PM

Just adding on to the narrative. Today there is a historical marker on the coast road commemorating the unit that turned them back.

 

 

2011: Dave Clark and I looking at a Churchill AVRE at that intersection on the coast road. The far right was the limit of the German advance. Notice the markers and monuments in background. Photo courtesy Banshee One

l3V1II.jpg


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