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Astronomical Stargazer Thread


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#241 JamesR

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Posted 28 January 2020 - 0130 AM

Beautiful shot, JamesR!

 

I am missing one piece of my astrophotography rig which is the ASIAir Pro. Alas, recent issues means I'll be able to get it later in the year. I will instead have to use my laptop which severely limits the places where I can shoot the night sky.

 

My current rig:

 

Lumix GX85

Olympus 50-150mm f4-5.6 telefoto

Leica Summilux 15mm prime

iOptron SkyGuider Pro tracker

ZSO120mini + ZSO 30mm guidescope

 

Would really love to have the SpaceCat telescope for astrophotography but the import duties will easily make it almost twice the price. :(

 

Thanks!

 

I'm very fortunate to be doing this from my backyard.  We recently moved to a darker area on the outskirts of the population center.  My commute is 30 mins longer but it's well worth it. 

 

That sucks about the import duties but your rig sounds pretty good.  You should still be able to do a lot with it.


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#242 JamesR

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Posted 28 January 2020 - 0139 AM

Very nice, What we would see with just our eyes?  - i mean if they had more range -

Thanks!

 

If our eyes had increased sensitivity to see the color from great distances, I'm guessing it would be closer to an RGB view, and so it would be very red.  Ionized hydrogen (Ha) is the dominate source of light and its red on the visual spectrum.  Next would be Sulfur (S2) and its deeper in the red than hydrogen.  Oxygen (O3) is a teal color.  For this image, I used whats known as the Hubble palette.  I mapped Ha to the green channel, used S2 for red and O3 for blue, that way the structures of each are visible.

 

That said, these nebulae stretch for light years and yet their density is very low... so if you were to get up close to it in a spaceship or something.. I don't know that you would see anything.. perhaps a thin fog.  Certainly nothing like what you see in the pictures.


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#243 Corinthian

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Posted 28 January 2020 - 0816 AM

 

Beautiful shot, JamesR!

 

I am missing one piece of my astrophotography rig which is the ASIAir Pro. Alas, recent issues means I'll be able to get it later in the year. I will instead have to use my laptop which severely limits the places where I can shoot the night sky.

 

My current rig:

 

Lumix GX85

Olympus 50-150mm f4-5.6 telefoto

Leica Summilux 15mm prime

iOptron SkyGuider Pro tracker

ZSO120mini + ZSO 30mm guidescope

 

Would really love to have the SpaceCat telescope for astrophotography but the import duties will easily make it almost twice the price. :(

 

Thanks!

 

I'm very fortunate to be doing this from my backyard.  We recently moved to a darker area on the outskirts of the population center.  My commute is 30 mins longer but it's well worth it. 

 

That sucks about the import duties but your rig sounds pretty good.  You should still be able to do a lot with it.

 

True. I just need an external power source that I can bring with me to power my laptop because the software for autotracking needs a plugged laptop. The cheapest solution is to use the car and plug the laptop through the cigarette lighter port. But again, that limits the places I could shoot.


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#244 lucklucky

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Posted 28 January 2020 - 0943 AM

 

Very nice, What we would see with just our eyes?  - i mean if they had more range -

Thanks!

 

If our eyes had increased sensitivity to see the color from great distances, I'm guessing it would be closer to an RGB view, and so it would be very red.  Ionized hydrogen (Ha) is the dominate source of light and its red on the visual spectrum.  Next would be Sulfur (S2) and its deeper in the red than hydrogen.  Oxygen (O3) is a teal color.  For this image, I used whats known as the Hubble palette.  I mapped Ha to the green channel, used S2 for red and O3 for blue, that way the structures of each are visible.

 

That said, these nebulae stretch for light years and yet their density is very low... so if you were to get up close to it in a spaceship or something.. I don't know that you would see anything.. perhaps a thin fog.  Certainly nothing like what you see in the pictures.

 

 

Yeah i guess it would very smallish fog, are we seeing some sort of atmosphere ?
 


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#245 Ssnake

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Posted 28 January 2020 - 1138 AM

I just need an external power source that I can bring with me to power my laptop because the software for autotracking needs a plugged laptop. The cheapest solution is to use the car and plug the laptop through the cigarette lighter port. But again, that limits the places I could shoot.

 

A cigarette port connected to a car battery, and a car batter charger?

Lugging car batteries around sucks, too. But it might give you that little extra mobility. Could serve as a tripod stabilizer, too.


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#246 JamesR

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Posted 28 January 2020 - 2114 PM

 

 

Very nice, What we would see with just our eyes?  - i mean if they had more range -

Thanks!

 

If our eyes had increased sensitivity to see the color from great distances, I'm guessing it would be closer to an RGB view, and so it would be very red.  Ionized hydrogen (Ha) is the dominate source of light and its red on the visual spectrum.  Next would be Sulfur (S2) and its deeper in the red than hydrogen.  Oxygen (O3) is a teal color.  For this image, I used whats known as the Hubble palette.  I mapped Ha to the green channel, used S2 for red and O3 for blue, that way the structures of each are visible.

 

That said, these nebulae stretch for light years and yet their density is very low... so if you were to get up close to it in a spaceship or something.. I don't know that you would see anything.. perhaps a thin fog.  Certainly nothing like what you see in the pictures.

 

 

Yeah i guess it would very smallish fog, are we seeing some sort of atmosphere ?
 

 

 

Just concentrations of ionized gas and dust.  The center column in my picture is a region where stars are created.


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#247 lucklucky

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 0111 AM

Thanks.


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#248 Panzermann

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 1408 PM

 

I just need an external power source that I can bring with me to power my laptop because the software for autotracking needs a plugged laptop. The cheapest solution is to use the car and plug the laptop through the cigarette lighter port. But again, that limits the places I could shoot.

 

A cigarette port connected to a car battery, and a car batter charger?

Lugging car batteries around sucks, too. But it might give you that little extra mobility. Could serve as a tripod stabilizer, too.

 

 

Get a small handcart to transport all the gear? A trailer for your mountain bike?

 

 

 

 

 

in other news:

 

 

we were told by our parents not to look directly into the sun. Better leave this to the professionals:

 

 

Astronomers have just released the highest-resolution image of the sun. Taken by the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope in Maui, it gives us an unprecedented view of our nearest star and brings us closer to solving several long-standing mysteries.
 
The new image demonstrates the telescope’s potential power. It shows off a surface that’s divided up into discrete, Texas-size cells, like cracked sections in the desert soil. You can see plasma oozing off the surface, rising high into the solar atmosphere before sinking back into darker lanes.
 
“We have now seen the smallest details on the largest object in our solar system,” says Thomas Rimmele, the director of DKIST. The new image was taken December 10, when the telescope achieved first light. It is still technically under construction, with three more instruments set to come online.

(...)

 

more and photos at linky: 

https://www.technolo...sun-ever-taken/


Edited by Panzermann, 30 January 2020 - 1409 PM.

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#249 Corinthian

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Posted 02 February 2020 - 0030 AM

Panzermann: Yes, was thinking of a cart carrying a car battery and modified to have a second shelf/platform to put the laptop on. A DC-AC power inverter in the 500 watt range I think will be sufficient. The autoguiding software won't work if the laptop is operating on its own battery, so the need to hook it up to a car battery. The problem though is that while mobile, it is difficult to haul in the places where I'd like to bring it (far from parking and up the hill on foot trails). Still, a solution.

 

I'm looking at the cost though, and it's just a bit less expensive and much more prone to failure (e.g., laptop can accidentally be dropped or get wet and it's done) than the ASIAir Pro, so I might just wait for the funding to arrive and plonk the serious cash on the ASIAir Pro instead.

 

2020 should be the year I get the ASIAir Pro.

 

2021 is the year I get the Spacecat telescope.

 


Edited by Corinthian, 02 February 2020 - 0031 AM.

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#250 JamesR

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Posted 04 February 2020 - 0136 AM

Panzermann: Yes, was thinking of a cart carrying a car battery and modified to have a second shelf/platform to put the laptop on. A DC-AC power inverter in the 500 watt range I think will be sufficient. The autoguiding software won't work if the laptop is operating on its own battery, so the need to hook it up to a car battery. The problem though is that while mobile, it is difficult to haul in the places where I'd like to bring it (far from parking and up the hill on foot trails). Still, a solution.

 

I'm looking at the cost though, and it's just a bit less expensive and much more prone to failure (e.g., laptop can accidentally be dropped or get wet and it's done) than the ASIAir Pro, so I might just wait for the funding to arrive and plonk the serious cash on the ASIAir Pro instead.

 

2020 should be the year I get the ASIAir Pro.

 

2021 is the year I get the Spacecat telescope.

 

The spacecat looks likes a pretty slick setup.  I've seen a number of really nice shots taken with them.


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#251 JamesR

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Posted 04 February 2020 - 0140 AM

Finished up another image recently.  I present the Leo triplet:

 

get.jpg?insecure

 

I have 17 hours of exposure on this one.  I actually intended to go longer but I just picked up a new camera so I wrapped up this one.  Now I just need some clear nights :)

 

 


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#252 Corinthian

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Posted 04 February 2020 - 0300 AM

That's just awesome, JamesR. I can't wait to do some Milky Way shooting soon!


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#253 JamesR

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Posted 04 February 2020 - 2346 PM

That's just awesome, JamesR. I can't wait to do some Milky Way shooting soon!

Thanks!


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#254 JamesR

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Posted 19 February 2020 - 1715 PM

Picked up a new camera (ZWO ASI1600mm-cool) and tested it out on a popular target.  The bright star is Alnitak. This star is easy to spot in the night sky because it's the left most star in Orion's belt. The famous "horse head" is a thick column of dust that's blocking the light that's coming from all the ionized hydrogen. To the left of Alnitak we have the flame nebula. There are newly formed stars in the center of the flame nebula. This entire region is filled with dust which is also visible in this image.  This is a false color image taken with narrow band filters. In natural color it would be very red. I only have about 8 hours of total exposure which is less than I normally take.

 

get.jpg?insecure

 

 

Astrobin which is where I've been uploading my images experienced a catastrophic data loss event recently.  The site is still not 100% so if that thumbnail doesn't work, let me know and I'll post the picture someplace else (probably imgur).


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