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Protests In Hong Kong


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#41 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 0351 AM

Seem's to be something of a monsoon at the moment, the crowd's have left the streets for the moment.


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#42 JasonJ

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 0357 AM

Which is fine. The government offices are closed so probably worth taking a break even if no rain.


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#43 Nobu

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 0450 AM

I appreciate the gesture of Hongkongese demonstrators making their appeal to Japan and Japanese for support in person, but the last time Japan intervened to liberate Hong Kong cannot be called a success, unfortunately.


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#44 Murph

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 0510 AM

 

 

It says a lot when the PRC are behaving like just the kind of Colonial nation they accused Westerners of behaving. They have learned absolutely nothing.

 

BTW, did anyone expect any other end than ChiCom domination and repression of Hong Kong? There may have been agreements with "honor" and all that other diplomatic BS but it was always going to end with Hong Kong's utter capitulation. The only question was how long it would take.

Bingo, they've had 20+ years, which is more than I had expected back when the transition happened, but it was always just a matter of time

 

I absolutely agree here.


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#45 sunday

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 0517 AM

I appreciate the gesture of Hongkongese demonstrators making their appeal to Japan and Japanese for support in person, but the last time Japan intervened to liberate Hong Kong cannot be called a success, unfortunately.

 

Unfortunately, yes, like when RADM Iwabuchi tried to avoid Americans to conquer liberated Manila.


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#46 Nobu

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 0529 AM

 

Hinting that the UK could declare a breach in the joint declaration, he said the extradition bill came close to representing a breach, not just of the spirit but of the text.

 

 

And that will result in what?

 

 

The granting to Hongkongese of British citizenship with the right to reside in the UK permanently would be an interesting possibility.


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#47 JasonJ

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 0530 AM

 

I appreciate the gesture of Hongkongese demonstrators making their appeal to Japan and Japanese for support in person, but the last time Japan intervened to liberate Hong Kong cannot be called a success, unfortunately.

 

Unfortunately, yes, like when RADM Iwabuchi tried to avoid Americans to conquer liberated Manila.

 

 

Iwabuchi was an idiot and murderer.


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#48 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 0538 AM

 

 

Hinting that the UK could declare a breach in the joint declaration, he said the extradition bill came close to representing a breach, not just of the spirit but of the text.

 

 

And that will result in what?

 

 

The granting to Hongkongese of British citizenship with the right to reside in the UK permanently would be an interesting possibility.

 

 

We should have done that back in 1997. Wouldnt have bothered me, ive always been a Bruce Lee fan.


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#49 rmgill

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 0554 AM

 

Hinting that the UK could declare a breach in the joint declaration, he said the extradition bill came close to representing a breach, not just of the spirit but of the text.

 

 

And that will result in what?

 

Stern letters. Angry Speeches. The EU Military on standby.... The UN organizing several committees. 
 

I think it's clear that what ever the nobility of handing Hong Kong back to China may have embraced, it was a bad deal to do so, mostly so for those former Crown Subjects. 


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#50 JasonJ

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 0700 AM

 

 

 

Hinting that the UK could declare a breach in the joint declaration, he said the extradition bill came close to representing a breach, not just of the spirit but of the text.

 

 

And that will result in what?

 

 

The granting to Hongkongese of British citizenship with the right to reside in the UK permanently would be an interesting possibility.

 

 

We should have done that back in 1997. Wouldnt have bothered me, ive always been a Bruce Lee fan.

 

 

Bruce Lee's relative "Chin" would remain.


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#51 sunday

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 0815 AM

 

 

I appreciate the gesture of Hongkongese demonstrators making their appeal to Japan and Japanese for support in person, but the last time Japan intervened to liberate Hong Kong cannot be called a success, unfortunately.

 

Unfortunately, yes, like when RADM Iwabuchi tried to prevent Americans from conquer liberated Manila.

 

 

Iwabuchi was an idiot and murderer.

 

 

Agree very much, especially on the murdering thing.


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#52 Nobu

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 0823 AM

A post hoc grant of British citizenship to Hongkongese pre-Brexit would qualify them for EU citizenship as well. Now about that October 31 Brexit deadline...


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#53 JasonJ

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 0654 AM

Another day of demonstrations in Hong Kong, drawing almost 2 million people in the protest.

 

 

Hong Kong rose up in defiance a day after leader Carrie Lam suspended a contentious extradition bill, jamming the streets with hundreds of thousands of people and drawing a formal apology from the embattled chief executive.
 
Protesters wanted the complete withdrawal of the bill, which opponents say threatens the former British colony’s tenuous autonomy from Communist Party-ruled China. The largely peaceful crowds showed up in significantly greater numbers even after Lam indefinitely paused efforts to pass the legislation. A top government adviser said Monday there was now “no chance” debate on the bill would resume.
 
The central government headquarters in Admiralty, near the city’s core financial district, was shut Monday. A few hundred protesters remained on the streets near the complex as of 10 a.m., despite police requests that they move to the sidewalks and let traffic pass. Opposition lawmakers urged Lam to come forward and speak with them.
 
While the Civil Human Rights Front said more than a quarter of the city’s 7.5 million residents responded to its call to march, police said some 338,000 joined the protest’s main routes during the peak. Either way, the gathering was larger than the historic march on June 9, when organizers put the number at just more than 1 million and police said 240,000.
 
The government moved to release activist Joshua Wong, 22, who was jailed over his role organizing the pro-democracy Occupy protests in 2014. Wong would’ve been eligible for early release Monday and it was unclear whether the move was linked to the march.
 
The swollen crowds seemed strong proof that Hong Kong was in no mood for half-measures from the Beijing-backed government. The protest appeared to be the biggest since Hong Kong was handed back to China in 1997.
 
Asked Monday if the bill was essentially dead, top Lam adviser and Executive Council Convener Bernard Chan said “yes.”
 
“The chief executive makes it very clear that this is suspension indefinitely and back to consultation with the public,” Chan told Bloomberg Television. “You know that would take months and months. And since the legislative term ends just next year, there’s no chance the bill will be reintroduced back to the legislature.”
 
Lam issued a formal apology Sunday night, casting new doubt about her ability to survive the uproar. The government said in a statement that she “pledged to adopt a most sincere and humble attitude to accept criticisms and make improvements in serving the public.”
 
Her decision to suspend the bill was considered a shocking reversal. But protesters noted that her apology did not go much further in substance -- leaving open the options of fully killing the measure or her resigning.
 
“The suspension is just a postponement. The plan is just being delayed. It’s not the matter of what, it’s a matter of when,” opposition lawmaker and protest leader Claudia Mo said in an interview. Lam “has completely lost any credibility among Hong Kong people. She must go.”
 
Demonstrators clad in black chanted and carried homemade signs as they stretched from the North Point area 5 kilometers (3 miles) westward to Admiralty, spilling out from the official route and choking major thoroughfares.
 
Read more: Hong Kong People Power Makes U.S. Case on China’s Home Turf
 
“Hong Kong people are running out of ways and ideas to save their city,” said Savana Ho, a 25-year-old student. “The government is forcing citizens to just make any effort we can.”
 
Wednesday saw clashes between riot police and protesters attempting to storm the legislature to stop debate over the bill, which would allow extraditions to China for the first time. Opponents say it would further erode the city’s autonomy amid increased pressure from Beijing.
 
“The suspension of the bill has to be seen as a signal that protests can still be effective in Hong Kong in achieving specific results -- and that’s a very big deal,” said Jeffrey Wasserstrom, professor and China historian at the University of California, Irvine. “But all sorts of unresolved or only partially resolved issues remain, which will make it important to keep international attention on Hong Kong, rather than let it slip away.”
 
Resign, Retract
At the the march’s intended starting point in Victoria Park, student Venus Leung -- folding white paper flowers as she and her friends waited to join the crowd -- said she would keep protesting until the chief executive resigned. There is “nothing Carrie Lam can do to win back our hearts,” said Leung, 19. “She can only step down.”
 
The Extradition Law Stirring Protests in Hong Kong: QuickTake
 
As the afternoon wore on, marchers near the park chanted “Retract!” over and over -- seeking a more formal withdrawal of the bill. One cafe in Admiralty posted a sign to its front window: “Everyone keep up the hard work... if you are tired, come in and we’ll give you a glass of water.”
 
Betty Tam, 65, sat in her wheelchair outside government headquarters Sunday. She said this was the first time she had joined a Hong Kong protest since the historic vigils after China’s Tiananmen Square crackdown three decades ago.
 
“We have sat in silence for 30 years. But I think we have to come out now to support our Hong Kong people,” she said. “Carrie Lam has hugely disappointed us. She has to step down and we need someone politically neutral to become the chief executive.”
hong%2Bkong%2Bmarch.jpg
 

 

https://www.bloomber...er-s-compromise

 


Edited by JasonJ, 17 June 2019 - 0656 AM.

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#54 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 0656 AM

These are some truly fine people, they really dont give a flying fuck for authority. Maybe we taught them something worth learning after all. :D


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#55 Paul G.

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 0714 AM

These are some truly fine people, they really dont give a flying fuck for authority. Maybe we taught them something worth learning after all. :D


Now, now Stuart. There are fine people on both sides. 😉
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#56 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 0919 AM

:D


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#57 Nobu

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 1841 PM

The Filipino wife of a co-worker has had some choice words for Chinese/Hongkongese in the past. Her mother was apparently a live-in housemaid there, with all the rights and privileges of lower-caste citizenship thereof.


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#58 Murph

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Posted 18 June 2019 - 0530 AM

Notice certain people here support the communists as fine people.  :)


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#59 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 18 June 2019 - 0551 AM

Well we are all trading with them, so we must all like and support them on some level.

 

You can only blame Bill Clinton so far. You cant blame him for the continued appeasement across the west as the PRC inexorably eases across the line of civilized behavior with nothing so much as a wagged finger. When the Soviets did it, we had Charter 77. What have we got now? Nothing.

 

This was on the BBC the other day, describes what China has been doing to its largely forgotten Muslim population. Muslims today, Hong Kong next week I suppose.

 

https://www.bbc.co.u...na_hidden_camps


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 18 June 2019 - 0551 AM.

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#60 Jeff

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Posted 18 June 2019 - 0638 AM

Well we are all trading with them, so we must all like and support them on some level.

 

You can only blame Bill Clinton so far. You cant blame him for the continued appeasement across the west as the PRC inexorably eases across the line of civilized behavior with nothing so much as a wagged finger. When the Soviets did it, we had Charter 77. What have we got now? Nothing.

 

This was on the BBC the other day, describes what China has been doing to its largely forgotten Muslim population. Muslims today, Hong Kong next week I suppose.

 

https://www.bbc.co.u...na_hidden_camps

 

Yes, the Clintons were up to their eyeballs in ChiCom money, technology transfer and appeasement and every president until the current one let them get away with murder on trade and IP theft, but they didn't leave HK to it's fate, that was another country. You can argue that there was no choice or there was an agreement or whatever but everyone knew where it would end up eventually.


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