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Market Garden Through The Eyes Of A German War Photographer


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#1 HBoersma

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 1506 PM

http://www.volkskran...fotograaf.dhtml

 

Six photographs made during Operation Market Garden by Leutnant Seuffert, photograper (Bildberichter) with Luftwaffe Kriegsberichter-Zug 16.


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#2 Colin

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 1559 PM

What's the gun on the Stug in #2?


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#3 MiloMorai

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 2049 PM

Looks like a StuH 42 with the 105mm leFH18.


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#4 BillB

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 0954 AM

Nice find Hans, thanks for sharing. Nice pic of a Faustpatrone 30 there, don't see them very often IME.  :)

 

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#5 BillB

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 1006 AM

Looks like a StuH 42 with the 105mm leFH18.

Yup, from Sturmgeschutze Brigade 280.  Arrived in Arnhem on Tuesday 19 September with 7 x StuG III and 3 x StuH 42G, which were parcelled out to Kampfgruppen Harder & Moeller in the fighting along the Utrechtsestraat and riverside Onderlangs in the western outskirts of the city.

 

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#6 baboon6

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 1010 AM

The one of the Dakota is spine-chilling...


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#7 BillB

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 1047 AM

The one of the Dakota is spine-chilling...

Indeed. Shame there's no date, I suspect it could be identified if there were.

 

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#8 Colin

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 1332 PM

Just finishing Silent Wings about the Glider Assaults and the number of tugs shot down over Arnhem was pretty high, although the first wave did ok as they were far from the target areas.


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#9 Martin M

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 1615 PM

Strange .......... but - for me - photographs of Market Garden / Arnheim have a certain aura of  " recentness " about them, unlike earlier and later war photos, which could be hundreds years back from today.

 

Anybody else ? Or is it just me. 

Are the photographic techniques different or some other explaination.   Perhaps it is the Dutch setting.


Edited by Martin M, 18 September 2014 - 1616 PM.

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#10 rmgill

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Posted 18 September 2014 - 2238 PM

It's the Dutch setting. The buildings are a bit more modern in style as compared to the Normandy farm houses.
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#11 Panzermann

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 0344 AM

It's the Dutch setting. The buildings are a bit more modern in style as compared to the Normandy farm houses.

Yes. Even today in parts of Normandy one gets the feeling that William the Conqueror is waiting just around the corner by the look of small towns and villages.


Very well done photos over alll. Good find! :)

Edited by Panzermann, 19 September 2014 - 0345 AM.

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#12 Al

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 0854 AM

Just finishing Silent Wings about the Glider Assaults and the number of tugs shot down over Arnhem was pretty high, although the first wave did ok as they were far from the target areas.

 

Who is the author of the one you are reading?  There are 3 different books titled Silent Wings listed on Amazon.


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#13 BillB

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 1236 PM

If you had the full roll of negatives, you might be able to work out what Dakota it was. The author of Villers Bocage through the lens worked out the location of various photos, just by their position in the original negatives. If  one could do the same, then you might just have a shot at working out where the photo was taken, and compare it to crash sites. A long shot I grant you.

 

What I find intriguing is by the cargo door there is either a white flame inside the aircraft cargo door (whcih is an horrific thought in itself) or someone is still dumping cargo out. Lords Dakota maybe?

 

Great photos, thanks for sharing.

You wouldn't need to look at photos, not all that many aircraft were lost in the immediate vicinity of Arnhem/Oosterbeek and you could likely track it down from primary records if you had the date. I don't think it's Lord's Dak, he was away over the original LZ/DZs flying in close formation with another machine, and his folded up after a fire on the starboard engine & wing IIRC.

 

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#14 BillB

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 1237 PM

Strange .......... but - for me - photographs of Market Garden / Arnheim have a certain aura of  " recentness " about them, unlike earlier and later war photos, which could be hundreds years back from today.

 

Anybody else ? Or is it just me. 

Are the photographic techniques different or some other explaination.   Perhaps it is the Dutch setting.

Mebbe German cameras, film and photographers were higher quality?  :)

 

BillB


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#15 Colin

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Posted 19 September 2014 - 1323 PM

 

Just finishing Silent Wings about the Glider Assaults and the number of tugs shot down over Arnhem was pretty high, although the first wave did ok as they were far from the target areas.

 

Who is the author of the one you are reading?  There are 3 different books titled Silent Wings listed on Amazon.

 

Gerard M. Devlin , here is a documentary based on the book.

 


Edited by Colin, 19 September 2014 - 1325 PM.

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#16 HBoersma

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 0555 AM

Perhaps also of interest:

 

Market Garden, the suprise attack that failed (video)

Images from the NIMH collection (Netherlands Institute of Military History)


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#17 Colin

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 1052 AM

the book argues 3 reasons things went wrong.

 

1. DZ to far from objectives

2. failure to appreciate and incorporate intelligence from partizan's about abundant armour in the area

3. Model's knack for reorganizing and commanding the units under his control. 


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#18 Phil

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 1126 AM

I'd argue only one thing went wrong - the western front situation was not what the allies believed it to be.

 

The whole operation seems to have been planned on the basis of it taking place in an almost semi-permissive environment (by WWII standards). 


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#19 shep854

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 1312 PM

In the British Market/Garden movie made right after the war, a clip was shown of a Dak going down in flames; a parachute opened just before it hit the ground. ISTR that aircraft went down at a steeper angle than the photo in the original link.

Edited by shep854, 20 September 2014 - 1314 PM.

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#20 Beitou

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Posted 20 September 2014 - 1605 PM

Was that Theirs was the Glory?


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