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#1 Mikel2

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Posted 31 October 2018 - 2008 PM

Saw this in Ansonia, CT. Is it a naval gun, or a coastal one?  It was marked "Armstrong"  and "1898".

 

https://www.flickr.c...eposted-public/

 

https://www.flickr.c...eposted-public/


Edited by Mikel2, 31 October 2018 - 2012 PM.

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#2 shootER5

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Posted 31 October 2018 - 2034 PM

British QF 4.7-inch Gun Mk I–IV.
 

https://en.wikipedia...h_Gun_Mk_I–IV

 

QF 4.7-inch Mk IV Armstrong No. 11856 on Central Pivot Mount Mk 1 No. 10842 (Formerly emplaced at Battery Drum, Fort Strong, MA), location: State Armory, Main Street, Ansonia, CT

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#3 Mikel2

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Posted 01 November 2018 - 0721 AM

Thanks!
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#4 DougRichards

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Posted 01 November 2018 - 1920 PM

Most coastal defence artillery weapons were based on naval guns, as the targets, and the fire control systems, were similar.

 

I have a book written by an Australian artillery officer, on coastal defence in Sydney 1939-1945, where he questions why coastal defence was an army activity when it had more in common with naval gunnery than land based artillery.

 

He also noted, amusingly, that electric light bulbs of the edison screw variety were not used in the Royal Navy after about 1895 as the concussion of the ship board guns when fired caused them to loosen and 'unscrew' from their sockets, and that bayonet light fittings were adopted as they could not 'unscrew'.


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#5 Panzermann

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Posted 02 November 2018 - 0741 AM

Most coastal defence artillery weapons were based on naval guns, as the targets, and the fire control systems, were similar.
 
I have a book written by an Australian artillery officer, on coastal defence in Sydney 1939-1945, where he questions why coastal defence was an army activity when it had more in common with naval gunnery than land based artillery.

 
In some countries coastal artillery is/was a navy business. I always found it odd for the very reason stated, when it was an army business.
 

He also noted, amusingly, that electric light bulbs of the edison screw variety were not used in the Royal Navy after about 1895 as the concussion of the ship board guns when fired caused them to loosen and 'unscrew' from their sockets, and that bayonet light fittings were adopted as they could not 'unscrew'.

 
The UK to this day uses bayonet sockets for their light bulbs. Now I know why.
Of course it had to do with the Royal Navy. ^_^


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#6 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 02 November 2018 - 1352 PM

We also drive on the left hand side of the road, to keep our sword hand free. Apparently.


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#7 MiloMorai

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Posted 02 November 2018 - 1522 PM

Shouldn't that be these days 'gun hand' free?


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#8 rmgill

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Posted 02 November 2018 - 1736 PM

Drinking hand sport.


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