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SU-122/54 Revisited


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#401 Jim Warford

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Posted 18 May 2019 - 2316 PM

Here is a list of confirmed SU-122-54 vehicle numbers by city seen during Operation Danube... 

 

§  Kosice                           TBD

§  Roznava                        500-series

§  Zvolen                           TBD

§  Ziar nad Hronom           200-series

§  Ceske Tesin                  800-series (probably)

§  Havirov                          800-series

§  Pribram                         300-series

 

SU-122-54_Operation%20Danube_Russian%20S

 

 

 


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#402 Simon Tan

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Posted 20 May 2019 - 2303 PM

How did they deal with the nose heaviness?
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#403 Stefan Kotsch

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Posted 21 May 2019 - 0210 AM

As with the T-62, front wheels are very tight and rear wheels but further apart. And maybe stronger torsion bars in front.


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#404 Jim Warford

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 2252 PM

BIS-1%20Mine%20Clearing%20Vehicle_SU-122

 

BIS-1%20Mine%20Clearing%20Vehicle_SU-122


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#405 Roman Alymov

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Posted 25 May 2019 - 0106 AM

 

BIS-1%20Mine%20Clearing%20Vehicle_SU-122

Another indication of how small our global village is: the guy on this photo (Anton Krotov) was among my fellows in university,  before skipping regular life path in favour of "free travel" arounf the world with backpack

https://www.youtube....FpETIVwWCcMV5zQ


Edited by Roman Alymov, 25 May 2019 - 0108 AM.

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#406 Interlinked

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 1529 PM

ihptmth8hl231.jpg


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#407 Jim Warford

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Posted 07 June 2019 - 2355 PM



I recently discovered another city where SU-122-54s were spotted during Operation Danube in August 1968...Zvolen, Slovakia. This brings the total up to seven cities (see below)...    

  • Kosice

  • Roznava

  • Zvolen

  • Ziar nad Hronom

  • Ceske Tesin

  • Havirov

  • Pribram 

In Zvolen (the latest addition to this list), a man laid on the ground in protest of the invasion, directly in the path of the advancing SU-122-54, hoping to stop the vehicle and those following behind. The assault gun continued to move forward and ultimately crushed the man in front of a bus full of witnesses, killing him instantly. This is the only reference I've been able to find so far, that ties the SU-122-54 to a casualty.

 

Here's a pic of the victim's memorial in Zvolen…

 

Monument_Jozef%20Levak_%20Zvolen_Slovaki


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#408 Jim Warford

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Posted 21 July 2019 - 2117 PM

Please ignore the "fin" round on the far right...

 

SU-122-54_Detail%20Drawings_1.jpg


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#409 Jim Warford

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Posted 09 September 2019 - 2318 PM

With some much appreciated expert translation help, I've learned a bit about the "Vehicle Size Indicators" on the SU-122-54. AFAIK, these devices (see pics below) are unique to this vehicle. It appears that the decision to put the driver high and to the far right of the hull (at the same level as the TC), as opposed to low in the hull, centered or to the left...created the need to provide the driver with an additional driving aid. The Vehicle Size Indicators (the easier to see short mast on the right and the taller mast on the left), help the driver maneuver the vehicle through confined spaces. IMO, that primarily means while driving and fighting on city streets as opposed to wide-open spaces...perhaps a lesson-learned from fighting in German cities during WWII. Each spring-mounted mast is topped by a red light that is faced away from the driver...    

 

SU-122-54%20Vehicle%20Size%20Indicators_


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#410 Interlinked

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 0153 AM

How does it work? I assume that they are just placed there to be within the field of view from the periscopes so that the driver has some reference point as to where the corners of the tank are?

Speaking of this sort of stuff, the driver's instrument panel in the T-10 has two red warning lamps on its left and right edges that apparently warn the driver if the tank is too wide. But there are no sensors on the fenders or anything of the sort. Any idea on what they might be?

Edited by Interlinked, 10 September 2019 - 0208 AM.

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#411 Roman Alymov

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 0731 AM

How does it work? I assume that they are just placed there to be within the field of view from the periscopes so that the driver has some reference point as to where the corners of the tank are?
 

Let me point out the model used by Jim for illustrations above is wrong  - it shows regular, undirected light size indicator lamps typical for all Soviet tanks on top of "Vehicle Size Indicators" while in reality it was special devices with lamp deep inside the body, providing  more or less directed beam of red light looking forward. If no obstacle, driver is not able to see the light as it is looking away from him. But if there is obstacle, driver will see red circle of reflected light on obstacle – and, if he is driving slowly enough, will be able to take measures (stop or steer away the vehicle). In day time, it is regular size indicstor

 

 

Speaking of this sort of stuff, the driver's instrument panel in the T-10 has two red warning lamps on its left and right edges that apparently warn the driver if the tank is too wide. But there are no sensors on the fenders or anything of the sort. Any idea on what they might be?

Not sure how it works, but there are similarly located lights on PT-76 light tank driver dashboard - may be it is direction indicators.....

https://avatars.mds....8556/scale_1200


Edited by Roman Alymov, 10 September 2019 - 0736 AM.

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#412 bojan

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 0906 AM

Those are indicators that turret is traversed in such way that gun is outside width dimensions of the tank's hull.

Additionally in PT-76 while floating gun should not be fired except in emergencies while in those sectors.


Edited by bojan, 10 September 2019 - 0906 AM.

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#413 Interlinked

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 2048 PM

Those are indicators that turret is traversed in such way that gun is outside width dimensions of the tank's hull.
Additionally in PT-76 while floating gun should not be fired except in emergencies while in those sectors.


Thank you. That makes a lot of sense.
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#414 Stefan Kotsch

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 1349 PM

These indicator lights for the position of the turret (left or right "over hull flank") were also on the T-55. The switch (so a kind of Maltese cross to switch) are located on the rotary ring of the turret.

Edited by Stefan Kotsch, 11 September 2019 - 1353 PM.

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#415 Jim Warford

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 2341 PM

 

How does it work? I assume that they are just placed there to be within the field of view from the periscopes so that the driver has some reference point as to where the corners of the tank are?
 

Let me point out the model used by Jim for illustrations above is wrong  - it shows regular, undirected light size indicator lamps typical for all Soviet tanks on top of "Vehicle Size Indicators" while in reality it was special devices with lamp deep inside the body, providing  more or less directed beam of red light looking forward. If no obstacle, driver is not able to see the light as it is looking away from him. But if there is obstacle, driver will see red circle of reflected light on obstacle – and, if he is driving slowly enough, will be able to take measures (stop or steer away the vehicle). In day time, it is regular size indicstor.

 

 

Roman; you are absolutely correct...the model simply provided the clearest view of these size indicators. While the correct size indicators are visible in real-world photos, it's hard to get a really good look. The photo below from Pribram Czechoslovakia in '68 gives a pretty good view...  

 

SU-122-54_Pribram_Czech_1968_1_1.jpg


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#416 Jim Warford

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 0052 AM

Here are two more images showing the Vehicle Size Indicators...Roman's description above confirms that this is a special and AFAIK, a unique device. As I mentioned above, this device seems to be very applicable to traveling through and fighting in cities in the dark, helping the driver negotiate narrow streets and alleys. With the fighting in cities scenario in-mind, that could be one of the reasons for fitting the SU-122-54 with two 14.5mm HMGs. As opposed to going with no MGs at all back in the day, or with one or two lighter MGs, this assault gun/tank destroyer had the firepower to easily shoot through walls and rearrange the furniture inside...without using the main gun.

 

First, more on the 14.5mm coax and loader's MGs... 

 

 

Now, back to the Vehicle Size Indicator...

 

SU-122-54_22_1.jpg

 

SU-122-54%20Vehicle%20Size%20Indicator_1


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