Jump to content


Photo

Hms Queen Elizabeth


  • Please log in to reply
1337 replies to this topic

#1241 DB

DB

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,745 posts

Posted 24 March 2020 - 0815 AM

It's obvious =- they have no intention of dropping the entire F/A-18 and E-2 fleets, and anything else that doesn't hover. Spending money on a futile attempt to remove that as a constraint requirements is one reason why military projects go wrong.

 

There is no money in "if it ain't broke, don't fix it."


  • 0

#1242 shep854

shep854

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,710 posts

Posted 24 March 2020 - 0906 AM

Navy/Marine 'Lightning Carrier' concept:

https://news.usni.or...ultiple-amphibs

Marines Test 'Lightning Carrier' Concept, Control 13 F-35Bs from Multiple Amphibs


  • 0

#1243 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 59,388 posts

Posted 26 March 2020 - 1350 PM

The Ford Class is in deep poo poo.

https://www.thedrive...rally-the-shits
  • 0

#1244 Nobu

Nobu

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 4,661 posts

Posted 26 March 2020 - 1432 PM

The side note about its stores elevators being unable to handle a standard Trader Joe's pallet lift does not inspire confidence either. The basics do not appear to have been thought out.


  • 0

#1245 Ken Estes

Ken Estes

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,027 posts

Posted 28 March 2020 - 1628 PM

Some notes from Warship Intl:

 

Prince of Wales (R09) commissioned 10Dec19 at Portsmouth, thereby becoming the largest warship ever built in Great Britain, being marginally larger and heavier than the class leader.

 

QE (R08) deployed with up to 36 F-35B fighters, operating interchangeably with US carriers off US Atlantic Coast, since departure from UK 2Sept19.

 

Delay of submarine: Audacious (S97) is delayed 19 mo.


Edited by Ken Estes, 04 April 2020 - 1521 PM.

  • 0

#1246 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 59,388 posts

Posted 30 May 2020 - 0135 AM

Interesting article on the new logistic support vessels for the new Carriers. Much to my surprise one of the yards in the bidding is, what I thought defunct, Harland and Wolff.

https://www.defensen...upport-program/


  • 0

#1247 JasonJ

JasonJ

    nonbiri

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12,510 posts

Posted 30 May 2020 - 1050 AM

Interesting article on the new logistic support vessels for the new Carriers. Much to my surprise one of the yards in the bidding is, what I thought defunct, Harland and Wolff.
https://www.defensen...upport-program/


Three would be nice but with how often procurement target gets cut, it'll be 2.
  • 0

#1248 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 59,388 posts

Posted 06 July 2020 - 0230 AM

Well that ones ready then.

 


  • 0

#1249 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 59,388 posts

Posted 06 July 2020 - 0234 AM


  • 0

#1250 JasonJ

JasonJ

    nonbiri

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12,510 posts

Posted 08 July 2020 - 1815 PM

Maybe one day, a British F-35B on the deck will share a picture with an American F-35B on one side of it and a Japanese F-35B on the other.
  • 0

#1251 Nobu

Nobu

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 4,661 posts

Posted 08 July 2020 - 1856 PM

Well that ones ready then.

 

 

The impression from the interviews is that Britain is re-learning carrier operations all over again. It is sometimes more expensive to completely eliminate expertise versus maintaining it. Hoping that Japan and Japanese draw lessons from this.


  • 0

#1252 Nobu

Nobu

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 4,661 posts

Posted 08 July 2020 - 1901 PM

Group Captain Beck: "We've got engineers learning what it's like to fight the whole [naval air] system, and we haven't done that for almost a decade." 

 

Welcome back  :D


  • 0

#1253 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 59,388 posts

Posted 09 July 2020 - 0143 AM

What terrifies me is this thought. David Cameron crassly (stupidly, incompetently, ineptly, use a word of your choice) eliminated the Harrier force in 2010 as a quick fix against the financial crash. And here we are 10 years later in a financial fix probably worse than we were then, and Dominic Cummings, long term critic of the carriers, is going around defence sniffing around for cost cuttings to be made.

https://www.independ...n-a9609016.html

 

I said 20 years ago on Tanknet when we were first discussing these that they would never enter service, and if they did, the yanks would kill F35B. Despite a few near scrapes, I was completely and totally wrong. What I didnt stop to consider is how long they would remain in service in light of the modern fetish for fiscal responsibility over combat capability, and how many times that trend has utterly shafted the Royal Navy.

 

I pray im wrong. After the long haul the navy has gone through to get them, they deserve their moment in the sun again.


  • 0

#1254 Nobu

Nobu

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 4,661 posts

Posted 09 July 2020 - 1107 AM

Quick fixes are the worst kind. They are also the most politically expedient, unfortunately. The we are learning to crawl before we can walk tone of the video commentary produced mixed feelings, as while better late than never for Britain's sake, it is not exactly in keeping with the finest traditions.

 

The deadliest threat to 65,000 tons of British fighting steel ends up being... a British bureaucrat. No wonder the Empire lasted as long as it did. The administration of it must have been awesome to behold.


  • 0

#1255 Steven P Allen

Steven P Allen

    Tilter at Windmills

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 1,461 posts

Posted 09 July 2020 - 1532 PM

Shame is, "fiscal responsibility" is hardly a straight-forward concept.  We all remember which navy is the MOST expensive . . . .


  • 0

#1256 Nobu

Nobu

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 4,661 posts

Posted 09 July 2020 - 2000 PM

The second best?  :)


  • 0

#1257 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 59,388 posts

Posted 10 July 2020 - 0203 AM

On a related note, the Royal Navy receives back HMS Lancaster, after a fairly extensive upgrade.

 

 

Shame is, "fiscal responsibility" is hardly a straight-forward concept.  We all remember which navy is the MOST expensive . . . .

Because it absolutely refuses to look at cheaper options. They have been looking at light carriers like the QE since the early 1970's (its in Admiral Zumwalts memoirs its that old), and still nothing is done.  The cynic in my thinks the only way the USN is going to solve its problems is defund it. The Great Navy of the 1980's arose out of the fiscally austere 1970's after all.


  • 0

#1258 Jeff

Jeff

    Godfather of Tanknet Birthday Greetings

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10,279 posts

Posted 10 July 2020 - 1633 PM

Maybe one day, a British F-35B on the deck will share a picture with an American F-35B on one side of it and a Japanese F-35B on the other.

 

Excellent


  • 0

#1259 Jeff

Jeff

    Godfather of Tanknet Birthday Greetings

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10,279 posts

Posted 10 July 2020 - 1634 PM

 

Well that ones ready then.

 

 

The impression from the interviews is that Britain is re-learning carrier operations all over again. It is sometimes more expensive to completely eliminate expertise versus maintaining it. Hoping that Japan and Japanese draw lessons from this.

 

 

Building and operating large warships is a very perishable skill. You can't just turn it on and off.


  • 0

#1260 Jeff

Jeff

    Godfather of Tanknet Birthday Greetings

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10,279 posts

Posted 10 July 2020 - 1640 PM

Well that ones ready then.

 

 

My God, the captain looks like he's in his 20's.


  • 0