Jump to content


Photo

What Books Are You Reading Right Now?

books sikkiyn tanknet authors knowledge entertianment

  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Sikkiyn

Sikkiyn

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 4,669 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 17 April 2018 - 1149 AM

Curious to see what people are reading.

 

Den of thieves by James B Stewart.

Den of Thieves tells the full story of the insider-trading scandal that nearly destroyed Wall Street, the men who pulled it off, and the chase that finally brought them to justice.

 

The Predators Ball by Connie Bruck.

An insightful portrait of junk-bond powerhouse Drexel Burnham Lambert and infamous financier Michael Milken,

 

Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond.

Jared Diamond convincingly argues that geographical and environmental factors shaped the modern world. Societies that had had a head start in food production advanced beyond the hunter-gatherer stage, and then developed religion --as well as nasty germs and potent weapons of war --and adventured on sea and land to conquer and decimate preliterate cultures. A major advance in our understanding of human societies, Guns, Germs, and Steel chronicles the way that the modern world came to be and stunningly dismantles racially based theories of human history.

 

Trade and Civilization in the Indian Ocean: An Economic History from the Rise of Islam to 1750 by K.N. Chaudhuri.

Before the age of Industrial Revolution, the great Asian civilisations - whether located in the Middle East, India, South-East Asia, or the Far East - constituted areas not only of high culture but also of advanced economic development. They were the First World of human societies. This 1985 book examines one of the driving forces of that historical period: the long chain of oceanic trade which stretched from the South China Sea to the eastern Mediterranean. It also looks at the natural complement of the seaborne commerce, its counterpart in the caravan trade. Its main achievement is to show how socially determined demand derived from cultural habits and interpretations operated through the medium of market forces and relative prices. It points out the unique and limiting features of Asian commercial capitalism, and shows how the contribution of Asian merchants was valued universally, in reality if not legally and formally. Professor Chaudhuri's book, based on more than twenty years' research and reflection on pre-modern trade and civilisations, was a landmark in the analysis and interpretation of Asia's historical position and development.


  • 0

#2 RETAC21

RETAC21

    A la lealtad y al valor

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13,545 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Madrid, Spain
  • Interests:Military history in general

Posted 17 April 2018 - 1415 PM

Cochrane the Dauntless: The Life and Adventures of Admiral Thomas Cochrane, 1775-1860

Patrick O' Brian, C.S. Forester and Captain Marryat all based their literary heroes on Thomas Cochrane, but Cochrane's exploits were far more daring and exciting than those of his fictional counterparts. He was a man of action, whose bold and impulsive nature meant he was often his own worst enemy. Writing with gripping narrative skill and drawing on his own travels and original research, Cordingly tells the rip-roaring story of a flawed Romantic hero who helped define his age.

 

We Will Not Go to Tuapse: From the Donets to the Oder with the Legion Wallonie and 5th SS Volunteer Assault Brigade ‘Wallonien’ 1942-45

This is a classic soldier’s chronicle, told in unvarnished candor, about the author’s experiences as a volunteer with the Wallonian Legion of the German Army and later the 5th SS Volunteer Assault Brigade Wallonien and the 28th SS Volunteer Grenadier Division Wallonien. However, it also ventures far beyond the usual soldier's story and approaches a travelogue of the Eastern Front campaign, seldom attained by the memoirs of the period. His self-published book in French is highly regarded by Belgian historian and expert on these volunteers Eddy de Bruyne, and Battle of Cherkassy author Douglas Nash. This book merits attention as the SS volunteer equivalent of Guy Sajer’s The Forgotten Soldier, a bestseller in the USA and Europe. By comparison, Kaisergruber’s story has the advantage of being completely verifiable by documents and serious historical narratives already published, such as Eddy de Bruyne’s For Rex and for Belgium and Kenneth Estes' European Anabasis.

 

Recently:

 

 

Dereliction of Duty: Johnson, McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies That Led to Vietnam

Dereliction Of Duty is a stunning analysis of how and why the United States became involved in an all-out and disastrous war in Southeast Asia. Fully and convincingly researched, based on transcripts and personal accounts of crucial meetings, confrontations and decisions, it is the only book that fully re-creates what happened and why. McMaster pinpoints the policies and decisions that got the United States into the morass and reveals who made these decisions and the motives behind them, disproving the published theories of other historians and excuses of the participants.

 
A page-turning narrative, Dereliction Of Duty focuses on a fascinating cast of characters: President Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, General Maxwell Taylor, McGeorge Bundy and other top aides who deliberately deceived the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the U.S. Congress and the American public.
 
More so in light of HR McMaster demise as National Security Advisor...
 
America's War for the Greater Middle East: A Military History
From the end of World War II until 1980, virtually no American soldiers were killed in action while serving in the Greater Middle East. Since 1990, virtually no American soldiers have been killed in action anywhere else. What caused this shift? Andrew J. Bacevich, one of the country's most respected voices on foreign affairs, offers an incisive critical history of this ongoing military enterprise--now more than thirty years old and with no end in sight.

  • 0

#3 Brian Kennedy

Brian Kennedy

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 5,257 posts

Posted 17 April 2018 - 1655 PM

Orlando Figess history of the Crimean War (good but a little dry). Sterling myself to read Bloodlands again, but not sure I actually want to.
  • 0

#4 Harold Jones

Harold Jones

    Shaken but not deterred...

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 9,066 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Armor, History, Fishing and Beer

Posted 17 April 2018 - 1853 PM

Abandon's Gate
The explosive third novel in James S.A. Corey's New York Times bestselling Expanse series. Now a major television series!

For generations, the solar system -- Mars, the Moon, the Asteroid Belt -- was humanity's great frontier. Until now. The alien artifact working through its program under the clouds of Venus has appeared in Uranus's orbit, where it has built a massive gate that leads to a starless dark.

Jim Holden and the crew of the Rocinante are part of a vast flotilla of scientific and military ships going out to examine the artifact. But behind the scenes, a complex plot is unfolding, with the destruction of Holden at its core. As the emissaries of the human race try to find whether the gate is an opportunity or a threat, the greatest danger is the one they brought with them.

Abaddon's Gate is a breakneck science fiction adventure following the critically acclaimed Caliban's War.
  • 0

#5 Skywalkre

Skywalkre

    Garry F!@#$%g Owen

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,824 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ
  • Interests:military history, psychology, gaming (computer, board, simulation, console), sci-fi

Posted 18 April 2018 - 1123 AM

Finished these in recent weeks:

 

Misbehaving: the Making of Behavioral Economics by Richard Thaler

A history of the development of Behavioral Economics by and as observed by the author.  One story from the book summed up my reaction to reading it - Thaler was giving a lecture to Phsychology department professors at a university he was visiting about the basics of traditional economics.  The professors were effectively rolling on the floor laughing at many of the notions.  Just an odd book which makes you wonder why ideas that have been accepted in certain fields for so long (for very good reason) have received such pushback in economics.

 

Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much by Sendhil Mullainathan and Eldar Shafir

Talks about the effects scarcity has on human behavior.  They touch on scarcity of everything such as time (for successful businessmen) and food (those on diets) but mostly the books focuses on those living in poverty and how behavior is drastically changed (mostly for the worst) when money is tight.  A lot of lessons to be learned here and applied to welfare systems which could make them more effective for less.

 

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

Really troubling read about the criminal justice system in this country and how it impacts minorities.  The author argues racism is the underlying issue driving the problem but I wasn't really convinced.  What seemed more likely is that it's a simple byproduct of socioeconomic status.  If you're poor our system simply doesn't work for you (a major failing that needs to be addressed).  Blacks are the poorest racial bloc in our country, even poorer than Latinos, while also being one of the smallest groups by population.

 

What I'm reading now:

 

Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World by Cal Newport

Deep work is the ability to focus without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. It's a skill that allows you to quickly master complicated information and produce better results in less time. Deep work will make you better at what you do and provide the sense of true fulfillment that comes from craftsmanship. In short, deep work is like a super power in our increasingly competitive twenty-first century economy. And yet, most people have lost the ability to go deep-spending their days instead in a frantic blur of e-mail and social media, not even realizing there's a better way.

 

In DEEP WORK, author and professor Cal Newport flips the narrative on impact in a connected age. Instead of arguing distraction is bad, he instead celebrates the power of its opposite. Dividing this book into two parts, he first makes the case that in almost any profession, cultivating a deep work ethic will produce massive benefits. He then presents a rigorous training regimen, presented as a series of four "rules," for transforming your mind and habits to support this skill.
 
What's in the pipe:
 
The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right by Atul Gawande

We live in a world of great and increasing complexity, where even the most expert professionals struggle to master the tasks they face. Longer training, ever more advanced technologies―neither seems to prevent grievous errors. But in a hopeful turn, acclaimed surgeon and writer Atul Gawande finds a remedy in the humblest and simplest of techniques: the checklist. First introduced decades ago by the U.S. Air Force, checklists have enabled pilots to fly aircraft of mind-boggling sophistication. Now innovative checklists are being adopted in hospitals around the world, helping doctors and nurses respond to everything from flu epidemics to avalanches. Even in the immensely complex world of surgery, a simple ninety-second variant has cut the rate of fatalities by more than a third.

 

In riveting stories, Gawande takes us from Austria, where an emergency checklist saved a drowning victim who had spent half an hour underwater, to Michigan, where a cleanliness checklist in intensive care units virtually eliminated a type of deadly hospital infection. He explains how checklists actually work to prompt striking and immediate improvements. And he follows the checklist revolution into fields well beyond medicine, from disaster response to investment banking, skyscraper construction, and businesses of all kinds.

 

12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos by Jordan Peterson

What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research.

Humorous, surprising and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.
     What does the nervous system of the lowly lobster have to tell us about standing up straight (with our shoulders back) and about success in life? Why did ancient Egyptians worship the capacity to pay careful attention as the highest of gods? What dreadful paths do people tread when they become resentful, arrogant and vengeful? Dr. Peterson journeys broadly, discussing discipline, freedom, adventure and responsibility, distilling the world's wisdom into 12 practical and profound rules for life. 12 Rules for Life shatters the modern commonplaces of science, faith and human nature, while transforming and ennobling the mind and spirit of its readers.

 


  • 0

#6 shep854

shep854

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,359 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Birmingham AL, USA
  • Interests:Military History, Aviation

Posted 18 April 2018 - 1643 PM

Pratchett's Discworld novels, as I can borrow the ebooks from my library. :P


  • 0

#7 Markus Becker

Markus Becker

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,877 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Westphalia, Germany

Posted 19 April 2018 - 0640 AM

Misfire: The Story of How America's Small Arms Have Failed Our Military by W.H. Hallahan

 

 

He appears to be very, very knowledgable about US firearms and the political/administrative infighting that came with them. His remarks about German small arms are a bit off, the ones about German heavy weapons/AFV/warplanes are mostly wrong. 

 

Further on the list are The Deluge, Wages of Destruction, Britain's War Machine, Fisher's Naval Revolution and The Luftwaffe 1933-45. I need more time. 


  • 0

#8 toysoldier

toysoldier

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,129 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Miami is a beatiful city
  • Interests:Sci-fi, history, gameplay

Posted 19 April 2018 - 0713 AM

The Assimilated Cuban´s Guide to Quantum Santeria, by Carlos Hernandez. A collection of science fiction short stories, enjoyable, got hooked by the title of course :)


  • 0

#9 Paul G.

Paul G.

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,527 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 23 April 2018 - 1529 PM

Hue 1968. By Mark Bowden. Very well researched and detailed to include VC/NVA POV. Shows just how out of touch with the reality on the ground Westmorland was.
  • 0

#10 Paul G.

Paul G.

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,527 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 23 April 2018 - 1540 PM


Finished these in recent weeks:
 
Misbehaving: the Making of Behavioral Economics by Richard Thaler
A history of the development of Behavioral Economics by and as observed by the author.  One story from the book summed up my reaction to reading it - Thaler was giving a lecture to Phsychology department professors at a university he was visiting about the basics of traditional economics.  The professors were effectively rolling on the floor laughing at many of the notions.  Just an odd book which makes you wonder why ideas that have been accepted in certain fields for so long (for very good reason) have received such pushback in economics.
 
Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much by Sendhil Mullainathan and Eldar Shafir
Talks about the effects scarcity has on human behavior.  They touch on scarcity of everything such as time (for successful businessmen) and food (those on diets) but mostly the books focuses on those living in poverty and how behavior is drastically changed (mostly for the worst) when money is tight.  A lot of lessons to be learned here and applied to welfare systems which could make them more effective for less.
 
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander
Really troubling read about the criminal justice system in this country and how it impacts minorities.  The author argues racism is the underlying issue driving the problem but I wasn't really convinced.  What seemed more likely is that it's a simple byproduct of socioeconomic status.  If you're poor our system simply doesn't work for you (a major failing that needs to be addressed).  Blacks are the poorest racial bloc in our country, even poorer than Latinos, while also being one of the smallest groups by population.
 
What I'm reading now:
 
Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World by Cal Newport
Deep work is the ability to focus without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. It's a skill that allows you to quickly master complicated information and produce better results in less time. Deep work will make you better at what you do and provide the sense of true fulfillment that comes from craftsmanship. In short, deep work is like a super power in our increasingly competitive twenty-first century economy. And yet, most people have lost the ability to go deep-spending their days instead in a frantic blur of e-mail and social media, not even realizing there's a better way.
 
In DEEP WORK, author and professor Cal Newport flips the narrative on impact in a connected age. Instead of arguing distraction is bad, he instead celebrates the power of its opposite. Dividing this book into two parts, he first makes the case that in almost any profession, cultivating a deep work ethic will produce massive benefits. He then presents a rigorous training regimen, presented as a series of four "rules," for transforming your mind and habits to support this skill.
 
What's in the pipe:
 
The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right by Atul Gawande

We live in a world of great and increasing complexity, where even the most expert professionals struggle to master the tasks they face. Longer training, ever more advanced technologies―neither seems to prevent grievous errors. But in a hopeful turn, acclaimed surgeon and writer Atul Gawande finds a remedy in the humblest and simplest of techniques: the checklist. First introduced decades ago by the U.S. Air Force, checklists have enabled pilots to fly aircraft of mind-boggling sophistication. Now innovative checklists are being adopted in hospitals around the world, helping doctors and nurses respond to everything from flu epidemics to avalanches. Even in the immensely complex world of surgery, a simple ninety-second variant has cut the rate of fatalities by more than a third.
 
In riveting stories, Gawande takes us from Austria, where an emergency checklist saved a drowning victim who had spent half an hour underwater, to Michigan, where a cleanliness checklist in intensive care units virtually eliminated a type of deadly hospital infection. He explains how checklists actually work to prompt striking and immediate improvements. And he follows the checklist revolution into fields well beyond medicine, from disaster response to investment banking, skyscraper construction, and businesses of all kinds.
 
12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos by Jordan Peterson
What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research.

Humorous, surprising and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.
     What does the nervous system of the lowly lobster have to tell us about standing up straight (with our shoulders back) and about success in life? Why did ancient Egyptians worship the capacity to pay careful attention as the highest of gods? What dreadful paths do people tread when they become resentful, arrogant and vengeful? Dr. Peterson journeys broadly, discussing discipline, freedom, adventure and responsibility, distilling the world's wisdom into 12 practical and profound rules for life. 12 Rules for Life shatters the modern commonplaces of science, faith and human nature, while transforming and ennobling the mind and spirit of its readers.

 


What did you think of Peterson? Saw him recently on Bill Maher and was not impressed.

*Explained why but was it eaten by the captcha monster.
  • 0

#11 Skywalkre

Skywalkre

    Garry F!@#$%g Owen

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,824 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ
  • Interests:military history, psychology, gaming (computer, board, simulation, console), sci-fi

Posted 24 April 2018 - 2126 PM

 

Finished these in recent weeks:
 
Misbehaving: the Making of Behavioral Economics by Richard Thaler
A history of the development of Behavioral Economics by and as observed by the author.  One story from the book summed up my reaction to reading it - Thaler was giving a lecture to Phsychology department professors at a university he was visiting about the basics of traditional economics.  The professors were effectively rolling on the floor laughing at many of the notions.  Just an odd book which makes you wonder why ideas that have been accepted in certain fields for so long (for very good reason) have received such pushback in economics.
 
Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much by Sendhil Mullainathan and Eldar Shafir
Talks about the effects scarcity has on human behavior.  They touch on scarcity of everything such as time (for successful businessmen) and food (those on diets) but mostly the books focuses on those living in poverty and how behavior is drastically changed (mostly for the worst) when money is tight.  A lot of lessons to be learned here and applied to welfare systems which could make them more effective for less.
 
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander
Really troubling read about the criminal justice system in this country and how it impacts minorities.  The author argues racism is the underlying issue driving the problem but I wasn't really convinced.  What seemed more likely is that it's a simple byproduct of socioeconomic status.  If you're poor our system simply doesn't work for you (a major failing that needs to be addressed).  Blacks are the poorest racial bloc in our country, even poorer than Latinos, while also being one of the smallest groups by population.
 
What I'm reading now:
 
Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World by Cal Newport
Deep work is the ability to focus without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. It's a skill that allows you to quickly master complicated information and produce better results in less time. Deep work will make you better at what you do and provide the sense of true fulfillment that comes from craftsmanship. In short, deep work is like a super power in our increasingly competitive twenty-first century economy. And yet, most people have lost the ability to go deep-spending their days instead in a frantic blur of e-mail and social media, not even realizing there's a better way.
 
In DEEP WORK, author and professor Cal Newport flips the narrative on impact in a connected age. Instead of arguing distraction is bad, he instead celebrates the power of its opposite. Dividing this book into two parts, he first makes the case that in almost any profession, cultivating a deep work ethic will produce massive benefits. He then presents a rigorous training regimen, presented as a series of four "rules," for transforming your mind and habits to support this skill.
 
What's in the pipe:
 
The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right by Atul Gawande

We live in a world of great and increasing complexity, where even the most expert professionals struggle to master the tasks they face. Longer training, ever more advanced technologies―neither seems to prevent grievous errors. But in a hopeful turn, acclaimed surgeon and writer Atul Gawande finds a remedy in the humblest and simplest of techniques: the checklist. First introduced decades ago by the U.S. Air Force, checklists have enabled pilots to fly aircraft of mind-boggling sophistication. Now innovative checklists are being adopted in hospitals around the world, helping doctors and nurses respond to everything from flu epidemics to avalanches. Even in the immensely complex world of surgery, a simple ninety-second variant has cut the rate of fatalities by more than a third.
 
In riveting stories, Gawande takes us from Austria, where an emergency checklist saved a drowning victim who had spent half an hour underwater, to Michigan, where a cleanliness checklist in intensive care units virtually eliminated a type of deadly hospital infection. He explains how checklists actually work to prompt striking and immediate improvements. And he follows the checklist revolution into fields well beyond medicine, from disaster response to investment banking, skyscraper construction, and businesses of all kinds.
 
12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos by Jordan Peterson
What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research.

Humorous, surprising and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.
     What does the nervous system of the lowly lobster have to tell us about standing up straight (with our shoulders back) and about success in life? Why did ancient Egyptians worship the capacity to pay careful attention as the highest of gods? What dreadful paths do people tread when they become resentful, arrogant and vengeful? Dr. Peterson journeys broadly, discussing discipline, freedom, adventure and responsibility, distilling the world's wisdom into 12 practical and profound rules for life. 12 Rules for Life shatters the modern commonplaces of science, faith and human nature, while transforming and ennobling the mind and spirit of its readers.

 


What did you think of Peterson? Saw him recently on Bill Maher and was not impressed.

*Explained why but was it eaten by the captcha monster.

 

Haven't gotten it yet.  It's the most popular book I've ever requested from my library.  Right now I'm about 20 out of 50 on the wait list so another 2 months or so til I get it.  I'm looking forward to it since I've enjoyed every video I've seen with him.

 

Just finished Deep Work (fucking AMAZING book, will be buying for sure) and picked up the Checklist Manifesto today.  I have tons of health books I also read but don't mention (they're all like 90% the same thing so no reason to).


  • 0

#12 MiloMorai

MiloMorai

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,813 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ottawa

Posted 25 April 2018 - 0723 AM

War of 1812 by Richard Burton.


  • 0

#13 Skywalkre

Skywalkre

    Garry F!@#$%g Owen

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8,824 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Phoenix, AZ
  • Interests:military history, psychology, gaming (computer, board, simulation, console), sci-fi

Posted 02 July 2018 - 1242 PM

 

12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos by Jordan Peterson
What does everyone in the modern world need to know? Renowned psychologist Jordan B. Peterson's answer to this most difficult of questions uniquely combines the hard-won truths of ancient tradition with the stunning revelations of cutting-edge scientific research.

Humorous, surprising and informative, Dr. Peterson tells us why skateboarding boys and girls must be left alone, what terrible fate awaits those who criticize too easily, and why you should always pet a cat when you meet one on the street.
     What does the nervous system of the lowly lobster have to tell us about standing up straight (with our shoulders back) and about success in life? Why did ancient Egyptians worship the capacity to pay careful attention as the highest of gods? What dreadful paths do people tread when they become resentful, arrogant and vengeful? Dr. Peterson journeys broadly, discussing discipline, freedom, adventure and responsibility, distilling the world's wisdom into 12 practical and profound rules for life. 12 Rules for Life shatters the modern commonplaces of science, faith and human nature, while transforming and ennobling the mind and spirit of its readers.

 


What did you think of Peterson? Saw him recently on Bill Maher and was not impressed.

*Explained why but was it eaten by the captcha monster.

 

I finally got this book about a week ago from the library and started reading it last night.  To call it amazing doesn't do it justice.  I'm only about 1/5 of the way into it because the notes I'm taking end up being 1/4 of each chapter so far.  Just... brilliant.

 

(I'm also a bit puzzled by the negativity I've seen directed at Peterson in recent weeks.  Nothing I've seen from him on YT or in this book comes close to deserving any derision.  I can't help but wonder if some have taken what he says and spun it and his critics are attributing that unfairly to him.)


  • 0

#14 Stuart Galbraith

Stuart Galbraith

    Just Another Salisbury Tourist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 53,875 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eloiland

Posted 02 July 2018 - 1309 PM

The translation of Georges Simenon 'Maigret and the Minister'. Ok, so these as a rule tend not to be very long, but they are very well done. Some of them even compare quite favourable with some of Raymond Chandlers works.

 

Also been reading Lon Nordeen's 3 Osprey books on the Harrier in Desert Storm, Iraqi Freedom, and the Afghan campaign. Very good, particularly the first. Also recently bought the Haynes owner manual for the Harrier, and found that a first rate read, particularly the contribution of the private owner of the Sea Harrier in the US.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 02 July 2018 - 1310 PM.

  • 0

#15 Mikel2

Mikel2

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 6,492 posts

Posted 02 July 2018 - 1329 PM

Stephen Kotkin's book on Stalin.
  • 0

#16 Brian Kennedy

Brian Kennedy

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 5,257 posts

Posted 02 July 2018 - 2133 PM

John Eltings book on the War of 1812, well researched and very sardonic. https://www.amazon.c...JfCL&ref=plSrch

Edited by Brian Kennedy, 02 July 2018 - 2135 PM.

  • 0





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: books, sikkiyn, tanknet, authors, knowledge, entertianment

1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users