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Iran Military Re-Arms


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#61 Josh

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Posted 25 May 2018 - 0744 AM

Doubt they've upgraded since the 2010 article in that respect, but possibly.
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#62 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 18 June 2018 - 0409 AM

Published on May 11, 2018

The January protests in the streets of Tehran highlighted a set of economic and political frustrations currently felt by the Iranian people. While Iran’s government faces challenges in addressing these frustrations with domestic policy, the country’s foreign policy stance and actions have remained largely the same since the 1979 revolution. What can be identified as the key current foreign policy priorities in 2018 for Iran? And what avenues for potential reform and change are there going forward, in particular, in regards to relations with its neighbours and the US? And is the perceived prioritization of national security and self-defence over other foreign policy initiatives the largest obstacle to potential changes in Iran’s agenda?

 


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#63 Roman Alymov

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Posted 08 February 2019 - 0408 AM

Iranian underground missile plant (as for me, it is fake facility - or, at least, not missile plant but some kind of underground storage)


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#64 Roman Alymov

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Posted 14 February 2019 - 1437 PM

https://www.nytimes....O8PKy6ZQpQRD8CA

 

U.S. Revives Secret Program to Sabotage Iranian Missiles and Rockets
 

By David E. Sanger and William J. Broad

  

Spoiler

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#65 Nobu

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Posted 22 February 2019 - 1220 PM

Would be fascinating to have an update on the status of Iran's ongoing F14 SLEP program, as they certainly have the motivation to fund such an effort with a blank oil revenue check.


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#66 Roman Alymov

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Posted 25 March 2019 - 0324 AM

The Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) on Thursday held offensive-combat drone exercises in the Persian Gulf, involving dozens of RQ-170 stealth unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that Iran has manufactured based on a model of a US Sentinel drone it captured unharmed in 2011.

http://www.iran-dail...in-Persian-Gulf

 


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#67 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 0325 AM

Would be fascinating to have an update on the status of Iran's ongoing F14 SLEP program, as they certainly have the motivation to fund such an effort with a blank oil revenue check.

 

Hey, anyone that keeps F14's flying has to have his heart in the right place.


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#68 urbanoid

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 0337 AM

 

Would be fascinating to have an update on the status of Iran's ongoing F14 SLEP program, as they certainly have the motivation to fund such an effort with a blank oil revenue check.

 

Hey, anyone that keeps F14's flying has to have his heart in the right place financial or other trouble with acquiring new fighter jets, which also leads to other such moves, like upgrade of F-4s (including Ds), refurbishing and putting ex-Iraqi Su-22s into service (for the first time, in current decade, as they never operated them before) etc.

 

There, fixed


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#69 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 0345 AM

To be fair to them, I entirely get why they put so much effort into retaining them. There are claims that the F14 community in iran (which would largely have been shah trained) shot down in excess of 100 Iraqi aircraft. Which with the sanctions ongoing and their complete lack of parts meaning I doubt ever more than 40 of them were operational at any one time, is deeply impressive.

 

It also kind of explains why the Iraqi's were not sporting enough to give the Tomcats trade in the 2 Iraq wars. Every time they saw 'F14' pop up on the RWR, they RAN. :D


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#70 urbanoid

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 0348 AM

Sure, it's the best they have, no argument here. But would you keep F-14s operational if you had a way to buy modern fighter jets? Doubt.


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#71 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 0351 AM

I would, but then im a deeply disturbed individual.

 

'Negative Fatah one, the Pattern is full'

 


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 26 March 2019 - 0352 AM.

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#72 Nobu

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 2209 PM

Hey, anyone that keeps F14's flying has to have his heart in the right place.

Damn straight


Edited by Nobu, 26 March 2019 - 2241 PM.

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#73 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 27 March 2019 - 0736 AM

I was on the Heatblur forum the other day, and someone posed the question 'What was the natural enemy of the F14 Tomcat', and some wag said 'Dick Cheney'. :D

I thought that was pretty good. :)

 

No, you are probably right Urbanoid, they probably wouldnt keep them in service if they had alternatives. OTOH, what alternatives are there? None of the modern alternatives, other than perhaps the Mig31, whose production has long since ended,, have anything like its capabilities. And the Russians seem to be very keen to hang onto those that they have. Su30? Maybe, though you still need a replacement for the long range missiles which still seem to be under development in Russia. In the short term there are no good replacements for its range, or its range of capabilities.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 27 March 2019 - 0736 AM.

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#74 Josh

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Posted 27 March 2019 - 0828 AM

I doubt that any AIM-54s are operational at this point. Has anyone actually photographed Iranian F-14s with ordnance? In any case, the AIM-54s effective range against a maneuvering target was well below its max range for a bomber sized aircraft. Indeed, I believe ripple firing was only possible around 50nm, at least that was the range it was tested at. For most engagements a modern medium range AAM would be superior in performance. As for replacements, the Iranian don't need a dedicated interceptor. Some kind of fighter would do fine. The F-14 is rather long ranged compared to F-16/17 but the newer F-15 and Su-27 models would superior replacements with modern AAMs and far superior radar and avionics. The fact that the Russians aren't selling them anything seems to indicate one of the main problems is money, not politics.


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#75 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 27 March 2019 - 0858 AM

Well I do have to say about the iranians, in 1980 everyone was patting themselves on the back that none of the Iranian F14's were operational, and a year later they seemingly demonstrated they  had got 60 of the 79 operational, including a Phoenix missile capability. The Iranians are clearly the most supreme bullshit artists, but we have to give them credit a history of getting the most out of the aircraft, and whilst I doubt there is anything like the 60 operational they once did, I think we have to give them a bit of credit at being some ingenious bastards when they put their minds to something.

 

The Phoenix is a case in point. They probably dont have much of the original stock left, but they do seem to have an ability to build a 'new' version of it. Supposedly they have taken the missile airframe, reverse engineered it, and put in a seeker head from a Hawk missile that they also have reverse engineered. Im  not believing they have the ability to ripple fire 6 of these, but they probably dont need to. But if it gives them a semi active capability out to 60 nautical miles or so (which is about where the Phoenix was most comfortable) then its a useful weapon.

https://theaviationi...farouk-missile/

 

There was an article here where they talk of extending their life out to 2030 or so, including fitting R73's (be interesting to see if they include the Helmet sight). Other reports seem to indicate they want to use the F14's bombing capability, which the USN demonstrated. Supposedly they had bomb racks delivered under the Iran contra deal, but ive no idea if they ever used them.

https://theaviationi...14s-overhauled/

 

Its not going to be a threat to F35's, but at low level delivering bombs, or even a long range interceptor, it could still prove a handful. Assuming they have the money to upgrade it like they say, there is a claim I read the other day they only have one F14AM in service, and that the upgrade was too costly.  OTOH, we have said things like that before and been disappointed.

 

I think they do need an interceptor personally. Look at the size of Iran, and the relative lack of missile defences. Yes, an SU30 would probably do, but long range reach is never going to go out of style.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 27 March 2019 - 0900 AM.

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#76 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 27 March 2019 - 1009 AM

https://www.thedrive...tandoff-strikes

Iran recently released footage showing one of its Ghadir-class submarines firing a new Jask-2 submarine-launched anti-ship cruise missile during a major drill stretching from the Persian Gulf to the Gulf of Oman, including in the highly strategic Strait of Hormuz. This came less than a week after the country commissioned the first of its larger Fateh-class subs, which reportedly also have the ability to employ these weapons.

The Jask-2 launch occurred on Feb. 24, 2019. This was the third and last day of Velayat 97, an annual exercise that included naval, air, and shore-based elements, which began on Feb. 22, 2019. The Fateh-class submarine, which is still undergoing trials, also reportedly took part in the drills, as did the Iranian Navy’s new corvette Sahand. Iran said that the missile hit a mock target, but there is no indepedent confirmation of the test's success.


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#77 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 0735 AM

Some interesting photos here of whats claimed to be Iranian Fakours.

https://www.tasnimne...issile/photo/14


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#78 Nobu

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 1108 AM

Befitting a missile named Phoenix first produced about 50 years ago.

 

Iranian F14s are well suited for the peer opponent and showing the flag missions. Less so for the fighting against the overwhelming strength, stealth, and jamming dominance superiority of the USAF mission, but the same would have to be essentially said for any 4th generation fighter the Iranians could conceivably use in that setting.

 

Being forced to create an indigenous technical and parts manufacturing industry from scratch versus relying on Grumman technicians and spares deliveries cannot have been cheap or easy, but it also has apparently created an indigenous Iranian knowledge base for a Tomcat SLEP and (along with its work on keeping Iranian Phantoms and F5s in the air) the nucleus of a fighter jet aviation industry in general.

 

Given the state of Japan's indigenous combat jet aspirations, the Iranians are worthy of some respect here in various ways.


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#79 RETAC21

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 1325 PM

Well, they didn't do that, they contracted foreign firms to build parts under various pretexts, particularly those Iranian industry couldn't reproduce, but sanctions did away with that.


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#80 Nobu

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 1434 PM

"Two months later, on 7 December 1986, the Pentagon's Joint Intelligence Group, along with the CIA, top Grumman engineers, and a large group of US Navy engineers and technicians started a two-week meeting at the Foreign Technologies Laboratories... At the meeting, a list of 132 F-14 parts was presented, along with nine cases of actual Iranian Tomcat parts. The objective of the meeting was to determine whether Iran was capable of manufacturing spare parts, or if they were being produced elsewhere. The general conclusion was that Iran was manufacturing spares for its F-14 fleet."

 

Cooper T, Bishop F. Iranian F-14 Tomcat Units in Combat. Osprey Publishing 2004;p.67:ISBN 1 84176 787 5


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