Jump to content


Photo

Archaeological News


  • Please log in to reply
779 replies to this topic

#41 Guest_JamesG123_*

Guest_JamesG123_*
  • Guests

Posted 08 August 2011 - 2022 PM

Arrrgggh!
  • 0

#42 Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe

    purposeful grimace

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,263 posts

Posted 08 August 2011 - 2158 PM

link

JERUSALEM Israeli archaeologists have discovered a Roman sword from the time of the destruction of the second Jewish temple in 70 AD, officials said on Monday as Jews prepared to mourn the anniversary.

The Israel Antiquities Authority said that the 60-centimetre (23.6-inch) long weapon and its leather scabbard were found during excavations in a 2,000-year-old drainage channel in the City of David, in the Arab neighbourhood of Silwan just south of Jerusalem's Old City walls.

It said in a statement that the channel, which funnelled rainwater to the biblical pool of Siloam, "served as a hiding refuge for the residents of Jerusalem from the Romans during the destruction of the Second Temple."


No TankNetters have shown up yet to claim the lost sword...

Some tunnel pics here.
  • 0

#43 Colin

Colin

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,990 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 0806 AM

Possible 10,000 year old village found

The oral history of the Heiltsuk First Nation tells of the ancient village of Luxvbalis, abandoned after a smallpox epidemic in the late 1800s, its precise location lost because so few were left to tell the tale.

The village may just have been discovered on a site in Hakai Luxvbalis Conservancy on Calvert Island, off B.C.'s central coast 100 kilometres north of Port Hardy.

The village's history could date back 10,000 years.

"People lost information about the exact location after they were decimated during the epidemics in the 19th century," said anthropologist Farid Rahemtulla, director of the archeology project that made the discovery.

"Based on that oral tradition and how old it was, we think this might be that village - but we need to work with the elders of the Heiltsuk nation to conclusively establish this."



Read more: http://www.vancouver...l#ixzz1UXIPapqm
  • 0

#44 Rod

Rod

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 7,229 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 1317 PM

Today is the 9th (Tisha) in the Hebrew Month of Av. On this date many calamities fell upon the Jewish people and is considered a sad day with fasting and mourning (I am getting hungry....). The 2 Temples were destroyed on this date besides many other calamities.

Recent excavations discovered tunnels where the Jews were fleeing the Romans (with video).

http://www.ynetnews....4106700,00.html
  • 0

#45 Archie Pellagio

Archie Pellagio

    Now flouridating a water source near YOU!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,224 posts

Posted 09 August 2011 - 1518 PM

On this date many calamities fell upon the Jewish people and is considered a sad day with fasting and mourning (I am getting hungry....).


Perhaps an indicator I should go to bed but I first read that as Many catamites fell upon the Jewish Peoples :blink:
:lol:

And I didn't know Judaism practised the whole fasting thing outside of Passover, interesting.
  • 0

#46 X-Files

X-Files

    1211st Desantsofter Legion

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 29,308 posts

Posted 18 August 2011 - 1019 AM

Archaeologists believe they have found the first pre-Roman planned town discovered in Britain.

It has been unearthed beneath the Roman town of Silchester or Calleva Atrebatum near modern Reading.

The Romans are often credited with bringing civilisation to Britain - including town planning.

But excavations have shown evidence of an Iron Age town built on a grid and signs inhabitants had access to imported wine and olive oil.

Prof Mike Fulford, an archaeologist at the University of Reading, said the people of Iron Age Silchester appear to have adopted an urbanised 'Roman' way of living, long before the Romans arrived.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-14555449


New research has cast doubt on the theory that 97 infants were killed at a Roman brothel in Buckinghamshire.

In 2008, the remains of the newborn babies were rediscovered packed in cigarette cases in a dusty museum storeroom by Dr Jill Eyers from Chiltern Archaeology.

They were excavated from the remains of a lavish Roman villa complex in Buckinghamshire almost 100 years earlier, but had remained hidden ever since.

The story caught the attention of the world's press last year as Dr Eyers suggested that the villa was operating as a brothel and its occupants committing infanticide to dispose of unwanted offspring.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-14401305

Evidence of a brutal massacre of Vikings in Oxford 1100 years ago has been uncovered by archaeologists.

At least 35 skeletons, all males aged 16 to 25 were discovered in 2008 at St John's College, Oxford.

Analysis of wound marks on the bones now suggests they had been subjected to violence.

Archaeologists analysing the find believe it dates from 1002 AD when King Ethelred the Unready ordered a massacre of all Danes (Vikings) in England.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-14476039
  • 0

#47 Rod

Rod

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 7,229 posts

Posted 18 August 2011 - 1053 AM

You probably mean Yom Kippur instead of Passover to the contrary is happy holiday and far from fasting it involves lots of eating, especialy Matzah. :) As for fasting, there are other fast days decreed by the Rabbis. Some are for the duration of a day only (meaning sunrise to sunset) and others for an entire 24 hour period.


And I didn't know Judaism practised the whole fasting thing outside of Passover, interesting.


  • 0

#48 X-Files

X-Files

    1211st Desantsofter Legion

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 29,308 posts

Posted 25 August 2011 - 0834 AM

Quang Ngai, Vietnam (CNN) -- Nestled in the mountain foothills of a remote province in central Vietnam, one of the country's most important archaeological discoveries in a century has recently come to light.
After five years of exploration and excavation, a team of archaeologists has uncovered a 127-kilometer (79-mile) wall -- which locals have called "Vietnam's Great Wall."

http://edition.cnn.c...l?iref=obinsite
  • 0

#49 X-Files

X-Files

    1211st Desantsofter Legion

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 29,308 posts

Posted 26 August 2011 - 0848 AM

The King's Knot, a geometrical earthwork in the former royal gardens below Stirling Castle, has been shrouded in mystery for hundreds of years.
Though the Knot as it appears today dates from the 1620s, its flat-topped central mound is thought to be much older.
Writers going back more than six centuries have linked the landmark to the legend of King Arthur.
Archaeologists from Glasgow University, working with the Stirling Local History Society and Stirling Field and Archaeological Society, conducted the first ever non-invasive survey of the site in May and June in a bid to uncover some of its secrets.
Their findings were show there was indeed a round feature on the site that pre-dates the visible earthworks.


http://www.telegraph...n-Scotland.html
  • 0

#50 X-Files

X-Files

    1211st Desantsofter Legion

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 29,308 posts

Posted 07 September 2011 - 1415 PM

(CNN) -- Before Moammar Gadhafi, there were the Phoenicians. And the Greeks. The Romans. The first Arabs. They're a reminder that no civilization -- and no leader -- is forever.
The Libyan transitional leaders have a lot to deal with once they stop being rebels, and begin shaping a new Libya: Keeping law and order, setting up a rudimentary government, dealing with money -- and oil.
But what about Libya's other wealth? Its archaeological treasures?
They are all over the country.

http://www.cnn.com/2...ites/index.html
  • 0

#51 X-Files

X-Files

    1211st Desantsofter Legion

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 29,308 posts

Posted 09 September 2011 - 1054 AM

DETROIT Police divers have discovered a cannon that could be more than two centuries old in the Detroit River. The Detroit Police department says its dive team found the 6-foot-long cannon near the Cobo Center downtown during a training session in July. It's the fifth cannon found in the area in three decades.
The department and the U.S. Coast Guard plan to raise the cannon from the river on Wednesday. It's expected to be restored and preserved by the Detroit Historical Society.


http://today.msnbc.m...094/ns/us_news/

Must have been Indians ditching it after doing a ride-by. <_<
  • 0

#52 BansheeOne

BansheeOne

    Bullshit filter overload, venting into civility charger

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 14,479 posts

Posted 28 September 2011 - 1016 AM

One Ring to rule them all.

Sapphire ring 'belonged to Anglo-Saxon or Viking royalty'

By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent


Friday, 29 July 2011

A unique gold and sapphire finger ring, found by a metal detectorist and just purchased by the Yorkshire Museum, almost certainly belonged to Anglo-Saxon or Viking royalty, very senior clergy or a leading member of the Anglo-Saxon aristocracy, say historians.

[...]


Posted Image

http://www.independe...ty-2328242.html
  • 0

#53 DADI

DADI

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,089 posts

Posted 29 September 2011 - 1423 PM

Today is the 9th (Tisha) in the Hebrew Month of Av. On this date many calamities fell upon the Jewish people and is considered a sad day with fasting and mourning (I am getting hungry....). The 2 Temples were destroyed on this date besides many other calamities.

Recent excavations discovered tunnels where the Jews were fleeing the Romans (with video).

http://www.ynetnews....4106700,00.html


A few contributors of this forum have spent some time there, recently...
Amazing findings done there every day..
  • 0

#54 Michael Eastes

Michael Eastes

    Trans-Dimensional Monarchist Ilk

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,525 posts

Posted 29 September 2011 - 1711 PM

A few contributors of this forum have spent some time there, recently...
Amazing findings done there every day..


Indeed.

We ( a team from the Soldier's Bible Ministry ) just returned from an intense week in Israel, during which we participated in a dig in the City of David in Jerusalem.

The area in which we worked contained strata that went from pre-Jebusite bronze-age dwellings up to late Byzantine, and everything in between. It was estimated that some of the artifacts being found went back as far as 3000 B.C.. On one day that we were there, a discovery was made that had all of the professional archeologists on-site very excited- it was a signet seal of Hebrew origin, but including Egyptian symbols ( scarab and ankh ), which is another link with Old Testament history- these people had come out of Egypt. Everyone was shown the artifact- it was in incredibly good condition, with the symbols clearly visible. It appeared to be carved from some sort of gem stone, a dark blue-gray in colour, at least to my poor eyesight.

Discoveries are being made every day on that dig, re-confirming and helping to cement the Biblical accounts of the eras that Jerusalem has passed through. It was a very exciting thing to be a part of, even in a small way ( I was a mere pottery washer, but enthusiastic ). My son found two Roman coins himself, which made his day. I got to meet and interact with a variety of young Israeli people working there, with a wide range of backgrounds. Just our pottery washing group included native Israelis, and new citizens from the UK, US, Rumania, the Sudan, and Yemen. All were friendly, helpful, and frankly a little puzzled as to why American Christians would be willing to come all the way to Israel to volunteer on such a project.

I left with n even stronger faith, a whole new appreciation for the people of Israel, and for one family in particular. ( Thanks, Dadi! )
  • 0

#55 Rick

Rick

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 4,236 posts

Posted 29 September 2011 - 1725 PM

Indeed.

We ( a team from the Soldier's Bible Ministry ) just returned from an intense week in Israel, during which we participated in a dig in the City of David in Jerusalem.

The area in which we worked contained strata that went from pre-Jebusite bronze-age dwellings up to late Byzantine, and everything in between. It was estimated that some of the artifacts being found went back as far as 3000 B.C.. On one day that we were there, a discovery was made that had all of the professional archeologists on-site very excited- it was a signet seal of Hebrew origin, but including Egyptian symbols ( scarab and ankh ), which is another link with Old Testament history- these people had come out of Egypt. Everyone was shown the artifact- it was in incredibly good condition, with the symbols clearly visible. It appeared to be carved from some sort of gem stone, a dark blue-gray in colour, at least to my poor eyesight.

Discoveries are being made every day on that dig, re-confirming and helping to cement the Biblical accounts of the eras that Jerusalem has passed through. It was a very exciting thing to be a part of, even in a small way ( I was a mere pottery washer, but enthusiastic ). My son found two Roman coins himself, which made his day. I got to meet and interact with a variety of young Israeli people working there, with a wide range of backgrounds. Just our pottery washing group included native Israelis, and new citizens from the UK, US, Rumania, the Sudan, and Yemen. All were friendly, helpful, and frankly a little puzzled as to why American Christians would be willing to come all the way to Israel to volunteer on such a project.

I left with n even stronger faith, a whole new appreciation for the people of Israel, and for one family in particular. ( Thanks, Dadi! )


Have to put this on my bucket list. Any evidence of the Red Sea crossing?
  • 0

#56 Michael Eastes

Michael Eastes

    Trans-Dimensional Monarchist Ilk

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,525 posts

Posted 29 September 2011 - 1730 PM

Have to put this on my bucket list. Any evidence of the Red Sea crossing?


I saw some film footage a few years back of wreckage of Egyptian chariots somewhere in the Red Sea- Sea of Reeds area. I'll look around and see if I can find a link.
  • 0

#57 rmgill

rmgill

    Strap-hanger

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,238 posts

Posted 29 September 2011 - 1823 PM

I left with n even stronger faith, a whole new appreciation for the people of Israel, and for one family in particular. ( Thanks, Dadi! )


I'm not religious but I do see the wonder you describe here. Sounds like it was a good trip!

If but for a time machine to actually visit these eras and see what was then.
  • 0

#58 DADI

DADI

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,089 posts

Posted 30 September 2011 - 0055 AM

I'm not religious but I do see the wonder you describe here. Sounds like it was a good trip!

If but for a time machine to actually visit these eras and see what was then.


It can give you a good sense of what life was, in Jerusalem up until 70 AC.
Huge, really massive buildings , halls, stairways, gates, fresh water systems, drains...
All found underground, leading to the Temple mount.
Fortifications, huge, 2500 years old.
350 ton stone, carved and put to place in the great wall surrounding the Temple.
History was never so clear...
  • 0

#59 DB

DB

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,369 posts

Posted 19 October 2011 - 1120 AM

"Fully Intact" Viking Burial found.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...slands-15333852

The term "fully-intact", used to describe the find, means the remains of the body along with objects buried with it and evidence of the boat used were found and recovered.

The Ardnamurchan Viking was found buried with an axe, a sword with a decorated hilt, a spear, a shield boss and a bronze ring pin.


  • 0

#60 X-Files

X-Files

    1211st Desantsofter Legion

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 29,308 posts

Posted 19 October 2011 - 1120 AM

The UK mainland's first fully intact Viking boat burial site has been uncovered in the west Highlands, archaeologists have said.

The site, at Ardnamurchan, is thought to be more than 1,000 years old.

Artefacts buried alongside the Viking in his boat suggest he was a high-ranking warrior.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...slands-15333852
  • 0