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#3481 bd1

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 0337 AM

floods in Irkutsk, Siberia

 

humanitarian aid packages being repackaged and stickers with United Russia (putin´s party) logo stick on

 

https://www.instagra...deo_watch_again


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#3482 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 0342 AM

 

Cosmonauts atre part of the media machine to keep space programmes going. So they are made into celebrities. Deep sea exploration is much less publicised in general and often enough there are military secrets like placing sensors or tapping wires going on.

 

 

 

 

"there are no blacks in Chernobyl tv series!"

 

Well... actually, RT german has found one soldier who was there who is of african descent: https://deutsch.rt.c...in-tschernobyl/

 

Игор Анатольевич Хиряк

 

I think this is his vk page: https://vk.com/id14744895

 

 

Makes me wonder how he ended up living in Russia?

 

Pushkin had Africa blood through his great-grandfather.

 

https://en.wikipedia...rovich_Gannibal

 

 

Is this going to be a start of a new birther movement? :)


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#3483 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 0343 AM

 

 

​​

6 FSB officers, 3 from the elite Special Purpose Center Alfa unit, 1 from Vympel, and 2 from the K banking department, were arrested on suspicion of stealing 140-170 million rubles from a bank. The search of the bank was conducted using a fake warrant.

 

https://twitter.com/...212159476215808

 

update

 

​​

An informed source tells Interfax that the total # of FSB officers being investigated has increased to 15, including the 5 previously arrested and 2 under house arrest. 8 of the 15 are reportedly from the FSB Special Purpose Center's Alfa unit. 14/

 

 

Pretty much what they did with Bill Browder.


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#3484 Ssnake

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 0346 AM

floods in Irkutsk, Siberia

 

humanitarian aid packages being repackaged and stickers with United Russia (putin´s party) logo stick on

 

Priorities, man, priorities!


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#3485 Roman Alymov

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 1303 PM

 

Pushkin had Africa blood through his great-grandfather.

 

https://en.wikipedia...rovich_Gannibal

 

And it was repeatedly mentioned in his poetry

https://daily.jstor....rican-heritage/

How Alexander Pushkin Was Inspired By His African Heritage

 

https://www.theguard...frican-ancestry

Pushkin's pride: how the Russian literary giant paid tribute to his African ancestry


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#3486 Markus Becker

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 1306 PM

Roman, are credit cards with no person's name on them a normal thing in Russia? Over here they are all personalized.
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#3487 Roman Alymov

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 1313 PM

 

 

 

​​

6 FSB officers, 3 from the elite Special Purpose Center Alfa unit, 1 from Vympel, and 2 from the K banking department, were arrested on suspicion of stealing 140-170 million rubles from a bank. The search of the bank was conducted using a fake warrant.

 

https://twitter.com/...212159476215808

 

update

 

​​

An informed source tells Interfax that the total # of FSB officers being investigated has increased to 15, including the 5 previously arrested and 2 under house arrest. 8 of the 15 are reportedly from the FSB Special Purpose Center's Alfa unit. 14/

 

 

Pretty much what they did with Bill Browder.

 

Not exactly "from a bank" but from illegal cash operator, so they were expecting the organization would not question fake warrant or ask questions.  (so you are right to draw analogy to Bill Browder, another criminal).  But they miscalculated, as now Ministry of Interior (following   recent scandal with illegal drugs used to fabricate case against journalist - case that quickly escalated to President level and resulted in few Police generals fired) is in "war" against FSB, trying to "pay back"  and is eager to use any opportunity to find ways to show FSB is also not perfect.


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#3488 Roman Alymov

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 1318 PM

Roman, are credit cards with no person's name on them a normal thing in Russia? Over here they are all personalized.

Personally i have never seen unnamed bank card, but quick search tell they do exist  - as they are easy to issue (but usually only provide limited service for obvious reasons) https://credit-card....ennie-karti.php


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#3489 Roman Alymov

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 0748 AM

Crossing into Russia from unusual direction


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#3490 Roman Alymov

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 1200 PM

Soviet\Rusdsian Navy submarine crews training centre. Slogan "Здесь нужно, чтоб душа была тверда; Здесь страх не должен подавать совета. ." ("   https://digitaldante...erno/inferno-3/Dante Alighieri, part highlighted below )

 

THROUGH me the way is to the city dolent;
Through me the way is to eternal dole;
Through me the way among the people lost.

Justice incited my sublime Creator;
Created me divine Omnipotence,
The highest Wisdom and the primal Love.

Before me there were no created things,’03
Only eterne, and I eternal last.
All hope abandon, ye who enter in !”

These words in sombre colour I beheld
Written upon the summit of a gate;
Whence I: “Their sense is, Master, hard to me!”

And he to me, as one experienced:
“Here all suspicion needs must be abandoned,
All cowardice must needs be here extinct.

We to the place have come, where I have told thee
Thou shalt behold the people dolorous
Who have foregone the good of intellect.”

 

 

66371785_1279432175550064_49542774563421


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#3491 Roman Alymov

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Posted 14 July 2019 - 0554 AM

Another Soviet classic movie with English subtitles


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#3492 Roman Alymov

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 0041 AM

https://www.rbth.com...iSjh5jiGq0N5Qug

What's behind the West's stereotyping of Russian women?

Oksana Bulgakowa, in her article "Russian Vogue" in Europe and Hollywood: The Transformation of Russian Stereotypes through the 1920s, refers to German-American film director Ernst Lubitsch for an explanation. After releasing his 1928 film, The Patriot, Lubitsch confessed: “We can only show Russia in a ‘style-Russe’, because otherwise, it would appear unconvincing and atypical. If we show Petersburg as it is, the non-Russian public would not believe us and say: “That is not Russia, but France.”... We are not historians or biographers, we are dealing with the imagination and feelings of the audience.”

 

It is almost directly what Chineese tourists say after visiting both Paris and StPete:  StPete is now looking more stereotypic "European" (clean, organized and with mostly white faces around) than Paris.


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#3493 Gregory

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 1940 PM

Putin's Huge Military Buildup Leaves Industry With Debt Hangover
By Andrey Biryukov and Evgenia Pismennaya
July 15, 2019, 9:00 PM PDT

Vladimir Putins 20-trillion-ruble ($300 billion) weapons-buying binge over the last decade has brought advanced hypersonic warheads and drone submarines. Its also left the countrys defense industry with a massive hangover of debt that officials now say is suffocating the strategic sector.

The industry is living from hand to mouth and doesnt have enough money to invest in vital new technology, Deputy Prime Minister Yuri Borisov told an industry conference earlier this month. Weve appealed to the president to clean up this loan portfolio, which he said totals more than 2 trillion rubles, costing as much in annual payments as the entire industry earns in profits.


Much of the bad debt dates back years and wont ever be repaid, according to officials and industry analysts, resulting from management mistakes and inefficiency at the mainly state-run companies that produce Russias weapons. After the Kremlin trimmed spending in 2017-18 -- squeezed by falling prices for oil, Russias main export, among other factors -- the industrys problems have become more acute.


This time bomb is now going off, said Konstantin Makienko, deputy chief of the Center for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies, a Moscow consultant to the defense industry.

Expensive Defense

At the core of the problem is the way Russia funds its big weapons budget. The government doesnt release the funds for new systems until theyre completed, forcing producers to borrow from commercial banks -- usually under government guarantee -- to cover costs before then. But the rates on those loans average about 10% a year, according to government data, leaving the companies with huge debt costs.

It will get harder to service these loans as government spending on new purchases is declining a bit, said Anton Danilov-Danilyan, chief analyst at Oboronprom, one of the largest state defense companies.

He blames management mistakes for the mess. Some overestimated themselves, others set contract prices too low or return rates turned out to be negative, he said. Some miscalculated what it would cost to take systems to factory production.

Adding to the problems lately are delays in payments on export orders caused by fears of U.S. sanctions on buyers of Russian weapons.

Debt Write-off
So far, the government plans to write off about 200 billion rubles of the most hopeless loans as theyre transferred to a special state-run bank designated to handle the sprawling military industry. Finance Ministry officials last week rejected Borisovs calls for the 600 billion-700 billion rubles in relief he said was needed to allow the industry to function normally, however. The biggest lenders to the industry are state-controlled giants Sberbank PJSC and VTB Bank PJSC, according to analysts.

In 2016, the government spent about 800 billion rubles to clear up some of the industrys debts, leading to a spike in defense spending that year.

This time, the Finance Ministry is taking a hard line. The loans were provided by commercial banks without the participation of the government, so the question of writing them off isnt on the agenda, Finance Minister Anton Siluanov said.
https://www.bloomber...h-debt-hangover


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#3494 Gregory

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Posted 16 July 2019 - 2014 PM

A ‘Dark Lord’ Falls in Russia’s Growing Power Struggle
By Andrew Higgins
July 13, 2019

VOLGOGRAD, Russia — A veteran law enforcement official, the head of the regional branch of Russia’s version of the F.B.I., acquired such a fearsome reputation in the southern Russian city formerly known as Stalingrad that when he walked into a local restaurant last summer, the other customers got up and left.

“Within a few minutes, the place was empty,” said Vyacheslav Cherepakhin, a local entrepreneur and journalist. “Everyone in the city was afraid of him.”

Last month, however, the official, Mikhail K. Muzraev, was forced from his car at gunpoint near his home in the city now called Volgograd by a team of heavily armed men sent from Moscow by Russia’s Federal Security Service, or F.S.B., the main successor agency to the K.G.B. He was flown to Moscow and jailed the same day.

Mr. Muzraev’s arrest roiled an uneasy balance at the heart of President Vladimir V. Putin’s rule among the so-called siloviki — a vast network of security, intelligence and military officials whose power, resources and clan rivalries have grown steadily at a time when Russia is starting to ask what will happen when the president’s ostensibly final term runs out in 2024.

Street traders in Volgograd. Under the guise of fighting corruption, Mikhail K. Muzraev so terrified the local business and political elite that the local economy foundered.

Since Mr. Putin came to power nearly 20 years ago, rival agencies like the F.S.B. and Mr. Muzraev’s organization, the Investigative Committee, have cooperated in persecuting the Kremlin’s critics. They are now increasingly at odds amid mostly hidden jockeying to influence a protracted and possibly unruly succession struggle. With the arrest of Mr. Muzraev, however, the infighting burst into the open.

Over 10 years as a senior prosecutor and then head of Volgograd’s Investigative Committee, Mr. Muzraev jailed two mayors and the chiefs of the regional police, the traffic police, the anti-narcotics squad and the emergency services, as well as a host of prominent businessmen in the Volga River city.

In interviews, several of those blamed Mr. Muzraev for destroying their lives with what they said were bogus criminal charges, and rejoiced at his unexpected downfall. But even they don’t believe the story put forward by the F.S.B. that their nemesis was involved in an assassination attempt against the regional governor, Andrei Bocharov, a former paratroop commander appointed by Mr. Putin to rule Volgograd in 2014.

The alleged attack on the governor — a laughably inept act of arson in a heavily guarded luxury housing estate in Volgograd — took place three years ago, hurt nobody, caused little damage and had previously been declared solved with the jailing of the supposed arsonists.

“Nobody believes this fairy tale,” said Roman Zaitsev, a former Volgograd police investigator who left the force to become a lawyer. Mr. Zaitsev was charged in 2017 by Mr. Muzraev with “inciting false testimony” after he refused to get one of his clients to confess to a murder he denied committing.

Mr. Zaitsev said he felt “brief euphoria” and drank champagne to celebrate after learning that Mr. Muzraev had been detained by the F.S.B. But his giddiness quickly faded as he realized that “this is not a victory for justice” but the result of “fighting between different clans from the same system.”

“This is not a fight between good and evil. It is evil against evil,” Mr. Zaitsev said.

On Thursday, in another sign of turmoil in Volgograd’s justice system, a female judge on the municipal court was found dead outside her apartment building in the center of the city. She was reported to have “fallen” from the window of her apartment on the 15th floor.

Nikolai Petrov, a political scientist, said the abrupt fall from grace at the hands of the F.S.B. of such a powerful law-enforcement figure as Mr. Muzraev was a clear sign that a divide-and-rule balance between different clans of “siloviki” — whose loyalty to the Kremlin and wariness of each other have been the bedrock of Mr. Putin’s rule — is wobbling.

“Without a clear signal from Putin about what he will do in 2024 or who will replace him, the whole system is coming apart,,” Mr. Petrov said. “Putin is in control of all major moves, but we see more and more moves by this or that elite clan.”

On the day after Mr. Muzraev’s arrest on June 10, the Interior Ministry, which oversees Russia’s regular police forces, ordered the release from jail of Ivan Golunov, an investigative journalist who, after reporting on shady ties between the F.S.B. and the funeral industry, had been arrested in Moscow on clearly trumped-up drugs charges.

Mr. Muzraev’s arrest roiled an uneasy balance at the heart of President Vladimir V. Putin’s rule among the so-called siloviki.

Independent Russian news outlets reported that corrupt Moscow F.S.B. officials involved in the funeral business had played a role in framing the journalist, but had then backed off after low-level police officers entrusted with fabricating the case bungled so clumsily that even the Kremlin was aghast.

Last week, seven F.S.B. officers, including members of the agency’s anti-corruption department and the grandson of a secret police general, were arrested for suspected involvement in a Moscow bank robbery last year. The bank is owned by a former officer in Russia’s military intelligence service, known as the G.R.U.

Russia’s elite has long been convulsed by infighting but most of this has taken place out of public view, invisible or at least indecipherable to all but a tiny circle of Kremlin insiders.

The last time different law enforcement clans clashed so openly in public was in 2007, in what became known as the “war of the Siloviki,” near what was expected to be the end of Mr. Putin’s presidency in 2008.

In the end, Mr. Putin never really left, taking the prime minister’s spot while entrusting the presidency to an old friend, Dmitri A. Medvedev, for four years before returning, for a third presidential term in 2012.
Mr. Putin could well attempt another ruse to stay on after 2024 but anxiety about his intentions has left rival power centers scrambling to assert their influence ahead of a possible transfer of power at the top, political analysts say.

At the time of his arrest in Volgograd, Mr. Muzraev, who last year left his post as regional head of the Investigative Committee, was working as a special adviser to Aleksandr Bastrykin, the national head of the Investigative Committee in Moscow.

The advisory job does not seem to have involved much work — Mr. Muzraev stayed in Volgograd — but it provided what had, until his arrest, seemed an ironclad guarantee of high-level protection.

To ensure that Mr. Bastrykin’s agency, which would normally handle a criminal case involving arson, could play no role in deciding Mr. Muzraev’s fate, the F.S.B.’s investigative department in Moscow has classified his case as “terrorism,” a crime over which the secret police have exclusive control.

Vladimir A. Sementsev, one of Mr. Muzraev’s lawyers, said the case was perhaps in part a routine shakedown by the secret police, who have a long record of arresting people to extract money or favors, or simply to show who is boss.

During an interview in his Moscow office, Mr. Sementsev received a call on his cellphone from a man who introduced himself as former F.S.B. general and offered to help settle Mr. Muzraev’s case. The lawyer said after the call that such offers usually come with a hefty price tag.

“I am not saying that my client has never done anything wrong. I don’t know his whole history,” Mr. Sementsev said. “But I am absolutely certain he is not a terrorist who tried to kill the governor.”

During a brief court appearance in Moscow, Mr. Muzraev, an ethnic Kylmyk, a Russian minority of Mongolian descent, dismissed the terrorism case against him as a “fantasy.”

Tatyana Stepanenko, the wife of the former antidrug squad chief arrested on corruption charges on orders from Mr. Muzraev in 2014, said she felt no sympathy for the jailed investigator because “he was a victim of his own system” and should have been stopped years ago.

“Everyone knew what was going on here but was too frightened,” she said.

Before his arrest, Mr. Muzraev was in many ways an exemplary servant of the system created by Mr. Putin. So long as they remained loyal to the Kremlin, law enforcement agencies under Mr. Putin have been given free rein to pursue their own intrigues, feuds and financial interests, even if these contradicted the president’s stated policy goals like the development of small business.

Under the guise of fighting corruption, long a particularly serious problem in Volgograd, Mr. Muzraev so terrified the local business and political elite that the local economy foundered. But he ensured that nobody dared rock the boat for fear of being targeted for arrest by his Investigative Committee.

Boris T. Izgarshev, a prominent local businessman who survived as an assassination attempt in 2001, said he was repeatedly pursued on trumped-up fraud and other charges by Mr. Muzraev. “The principle was simple: ‘If you want the case closed you pay,’ ” he said. “Everybody was afraid of him and still is. He has gone, but his system remains.”

Mr. Muzraev was so feared that he became known as the “night governor,” a reference to both his rumored ties to the criminal underworld and his shadowy powers outside the control of the region’s nominal senior official, the governor, three of whom came and went during his tenure.

Mr. Zaitsev, the former investigator turned lawyer, compared him to Voldemort — “He who must not be named” — in Harry Potter books. “He was Volgograd’s ‘Dark Lord,’ ” Mr. Zaitsev said.

Ivan I. Kurilla, a political science professor who grew up in Volgograd and taught for years at the city’s main university, said Mr. Muzraev’s fall from grace had all the hallmarks of a classic Russian power struggle, describing it as a clear sign that “dogs are fighting under the carpet.”

This is a reference to Winston Churchill’s observation during Stalin’s rule that “Kremlin political intrigues are comparable to a bulldog fight under a rug. An outsider only hears growling, and when he sees the bones fly out from beneath it is obvious who won.”

Mr. Kurilla added that it was not yet clear who would win the fight over Mr. Muzraev and his record in Volgograd, but it was already clear that it involved far more than a mere provincial quarrel. “Something is going on in Moscow,” he said.
https://www.nytimes....ia-muzraev.html


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#3495 bd1

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Posted 17 July 2019 - 1235 PM

 

 

 

 

​​

6 FSB officers, 3 from the elite Special Purpose Center Alfa unit, 1 from Vympel, and 2 from the K banking department, were arrested on suspicion of stealing 140-170 million rubles from a bank. The search of the bank was conducted using a fake warrant.

 

https://twitter.com/...212159476215808

 

update

 

​​

An informed source tells Interfax that the total # of FSB officers being investigated has increased to 15, including the 5 previously arrested and 2 under house arrest. 8 of the 15 are reportedly from the FSB Special Purpose Center's Alfa unit. 14/

 

 

Pretty much what they did with Bill Browder.

 

Not exactly "from a bank" but from illegal cash operator, so they were expecting the organization would not question fake warrant or ask questions.  (so you are right to draw analogy to Bill Browder, another criminal).  But they miscalculated, as now Ministry of Interior (following   recent scandal with illegal drugs used to fabricate case against journalist - case that quickly escalated to President level and resulted in few Police generals fired) is in "war" against FSB, trying to "pay back"  and is eager to use any opportunity to find ways to show FSB is also not perfect.

 

 

so all that makes this different from daily russia, is that there is currently power struggle going on and as soon that is settled, it´s going to be business/robbery as usual? and what is with your anger with browder, was scheming too russian for your taste or not  russian enough? bloody furriners stealin or wimmin/monies ? :unsure:


Edited by bd1, 17 July 2019 - 1237 PM.

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#3496 Mr King

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Posted 18 July 2019 - 1135 AM

If it wasn't for the signage along the roads in Russian, you could easily believe this video was shot in Tennessee and Illinois here in the states. The start and end of the video look like Tennessee smoky mountains , and the middle farm land looks like central Illinois. 

 


Edited by Mr King, 18 July 2019 - 1135 AM.

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#3497 Roman Alymov

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Posted 21 July 2019 - 0651 AM

If it wasn't for the signage along the roads in Russian, you could easily believe this video was shot in Tennessee and Illinois here in the states. The start and end of the video look like Tennessee smoky mountains , and the middle farm land looks like central Illinois. 

 

Looks like tourist decided to have a break in Black Sea seaside hilidays and go inland to see the country
Road sign at 0:07 indicates you are leaving Gelengik (Rus city on Black Sea cost) https://yandex.ru/ma...енжик&z=14
Road sign at 2:17 is pointing at Manych lake  - middway between Rostov-on-Don and Caspian sea https://yandex.ru/ma... Маныч&z=6
3:11 - Derbetovka, probably driving by Soviet street  - not far from previous point
5:54 - Rodyky https://yandex.ru/ma...
7:32 - Svetly near Gelendik, then driving uphill to Aderbiyevka, probably to see local church https://yandex.ru/ma...иевка&z=14
In general, more or less correct representation of how South Russia looks kike


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#3498 Roman Alymov

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Posted 21 July 2019 - 0742 AM

 

so all that makes this different from daily russia,

 

Is  corrupt law enforcement stealing money from criminal "money laundry" is something specific for Russia?

 

 


is that there is currently power struggle going on and as soon that is settled, it´s going to be business/robbery as usual?

It depends on one's political views - for example below is anti-Putin opposition (real one, not those morons speaking for Atlantic Council)  take from it


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#3499 Roman Alymov

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Posted 21 July 2019 - 0832 AM

and what is with your anger with browder, was scheming too russian for your taste or not  russian enough?

 

My "anger" on Browder is that this guy is walking free enjoying money stolen from Russia, not doing his time in Russian jail where he belongs. Isn't this enough?

 

 

 


bloody furriners stealin or wimmin/monies ? :unsure:

 

I'm affraid my English is not enough to understand you here.


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#3500 bd1

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Posted 21 July 2019 - 0856 AM

that it´s foreigner stealing russian money from russians and not russians themselves 


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