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Handgun Similarities?


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#1 Dawes

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 1001 AM

Pistured are the IWI Masada and Ruger American Pistol. The muzzle end profiles look striking similar, and the general profiles are a bit alike also. Possible that one inspired the other?

 

hThgo05l.jpg


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#2 Markus Becker

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 1212 PM

Imitation is the highest form of flattery and it makes sense economically too. ;)


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#3 GregShaw

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 1401 PM

Virtually every auto for the last 30 yrs has essentially been a copy of a Glock, this is just a more blatant copy of cosmetics.


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#4 Chris Werb

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 1605 PM

Convergent evolution.


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#5 bojan

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 1656 PM

 Glock ofc being compilation of multiple other solutions;

- polymer frame - H&K VP70

- trigger safety - Iver Johnson safety hammerless

- semi-cocked mechanism - Roth-Krnka 1907

- Locking - SIG 220 series


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#6 GregShaw

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 1741 PM

I never said Glock was original, nothing has been original in more than a century. What Glock did was successfully combine those elements in an inexpensive and reliable handgun. Combining the same elements into an operationally equivalent package is where most "new" handguns over the last 30 yrs is where they have been copying Glock.

 

Not a Glock fanboy, I do have a <500 SN Model 22, but its not something I shoot for enjoyment. It is my go to shtf handgun, because I fully expect it to work flawlessly everytime even after sitting unused for years.


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#7 Simon Tan

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Posted 06 December 2019 - 2326 PM

And there is your problem. 


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#8 Ivanhoe

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Posted 07 December 2019 - 0959 AM

To me, the Ruger looks like a derivative of the Smith M&P, which of course spins off Glock, etc.


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#9 Chris Werb

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 1649 PM

 Glock ofc being compilation of multiple other solutions;

- polymer frame - H&K VP70

- trigger safety - Iver Johnson safety hammerless

- semi-cocked mechanism - Roth-Krnka 1907

- Locking - SIG 220 series

 

Grip, Black & Decker electric drill.


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#10 Wobbly Head

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Posted 09 December 2019 - 2255 PM

If you are talking similarity pretty much all modern handguns are descended from the FN Browning M1900. Which also predates the Black and Decker drill (1917)
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#11 bojan

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 0810 AM

Grips are a fickle thing.

Almost vertical grips in the pistols was a revolver heritage and came from 1880/90s target shooters, as a period shooting position was with a bent elbow. Plus it helped with a reliability of the magazine feed.

"Luger style" highly canted grip came from a need to put both magazine and a flat recoil spring into it.

Browning prefered almost vertical one (as evidenced by Colt 1900/1902/1903/1905), only changing to a more canted one in 1911 due the US Cavalry request, so gun would be easier to pull out of holster.

Those two kinda stuck and people got used to that style, and now almost vertical grip is seen as an abomination, despite revolvers having those still.

Due the fact that they have to have magazine inside pistol grips are never gonna be as anatomically adopted to a human hand as ones on revolver. After all, high performance mag fed target pistols use mags in front of the trigger guard, for that exact reason.

My only complain about Glock grip was how slippery it was. But that is easily solved by one of those rubber "wrap around" things.


Edited by bojan, 10 December 2019 - 0816 AM.

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#12 Ivanhoe

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 0819 AM

I watched a good video on Youtube about fitting an AR-15 to the shooter. BLUF, once the buttstock is chosen and installed, the PG should be selected such that the hand/wrist angle is minimized while in a typical upright shooting stance. For most folks, the OEM PG is too angled.


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#13 Simon Tan

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 1951 PM

MOE-K2


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#14 GregShaw

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Posted 10 December 2019 - 2018 PM

I would bet it is a Camp Perry effect. For me the A1 and A2 grip angles are more comfortable prone than more 'tacticool' after market grips. I have more vertical grips on one of my ARs, everything else has A2 grips. The vertical grips may be better for action shooting, but for matches the classic works.


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