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Burning Kilo Boat

#Subs #Kilo #RussianNavy

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#1 Josh

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 0946 AM


This is just an exercise, of course:


http://www.thedrive....ike-an-exercise
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#2 GARGEAN

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 0948 AM

If you watched that video, you should saw that fire goes not on boat itself, but behind it. But yeah, this is just russian propaganda.
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#3 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 1002 AM

Probably having an outdoor party and the Barbecue caught fire.


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#4 Josh

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 1057 AM

It seems like burning diesel floating on the water near the shaft, but I've no idea what could cause such an incident. AFAIK diesel and diesel engines wouldn't be anywhere near the very aft of the boat. It likely did minimal damage to the screw, but the Russian explanation is never the less laughable.
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#5 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 1240 PM

Could this be one of those with propulsors, instead of screws? Wondering if there is a hydraulic system there that could have sprung a leak.


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#6 Josh

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Posted 22 January 2018 - 1344 PM

As far as I know only two were ever made like that, one test platform that has been laid up in the Black Sea many years ago and I think a new one based in Murmansk that was a test bed for one of the newer nuke boat's screws (Yasen? Borei?).

Its possible but seems unlikely. Does the propulsor have moving parts outside the standard rudder? Are the vanes inside the shroud moveable?
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#7 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 0256 AM

No idea. Its just an idea I suggest out of left field because I dont know any better. :)

 

I damned if I know how they ignited diesel though.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 23 January 2018 - 0257 AM.

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#8 Roman Alymov

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 0421 AM

Since this “parking” is in full view of entire city, and there are no reports\rumors about damage etc after two days – quite likely it was really training fire, may be training fire that got wrong (as it is reported as put down in 6 minutes or even three minutes by other sources, seems like firefighters and personnel were standing ready, so there was prior knowledge). Anyway, information will surface.


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#9 toysoldier

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 0440 AM

Well it comes in 3s. The Argentinian, the Indian and now a Russian submarine. Hope is the last incidentes :(
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#10 Roman Alymov

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 0523 AM

Well it comes in 3s. The Argentinian, the Indian and now a Russian submarine. Hope is the last incidentes :(

Submarines are nightmare for safety precautions planner, combining fuel (or even nuclear materials), highly pressurized oxygen and air, pressurized oil and hydraulic equipment, complicated electric equipment, range of chemical materials, explosives, and personnel operating all this in very narrow space – sometimes deep under water and at high speed. Not surprising incidents happen from time to time.


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#11 toysoldier

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Posted 24 January 2018 - 0150 AM

"Private Merezhnikov has finished his punishment. What do we do with him now?"
"Sent him to Navy. He can't set water on Fire, yes?"

Edited by toysoldier, 24 January 2018 - 0150 AM.

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#12 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 0440 AM

This time, a Udaloy catches fire.

 

https://www.fleetmon...divostok-video/


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#13 Roman Alymov

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 0456 AM

This time, a Udaloy catches fire.

 

https://www.fleetmon...divostok-video/

It was last week, fire suppressed without significant damage

http://tass.ru/proisshestviya/4964309


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#14 Chris Werb

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Posted 24 February 2018 - 0748 AM

Why would you have highly pressurised oxygen on a submarine?
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#15 Simon Tan

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Posted 24 February 2018 - 2053 PM

Perhaps you can write in to Russian Navy and ask.
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#16 Roman Alymov

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Posted 25 February 2018 - 0404 AM

Why would you have highly pressurised oxygen on a submarine?

Pressurized oxygen tank is part of every IDA-59 set every compartment of the submarine is equipped (in number enough for every assigned crewmember)

10846941.jpg

IDA59_13.jpg

 

also, big oxygen tank is part of some torpedoes

1457963080_53-56-1.png


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#17 Chris Werb

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Posted 12 May 2018 - 0735 AM

That type of escape equipment was replaced on British subs in the late 60s by a suit with an integral clear airtight hood and no rebreather system
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#18 Roman Alymov

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Posted 12 May 2018 - 0858 AM

That type of escape equipment was replaced on British subs in the late 60s by a suit with an integral clear airtight hood and no rebreather system

The idea of this equipment is not only "escape equipment" but also allowing crewmembers to breathe inside the boat for some time fighting fire\flooding. But down side of that is more complex design and potential dangers associated with pressurised oxygen tanks. No solution is perfect.


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#19 Chris Werb

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Posted 12 May 2018 - 0954 AM

 

That type of escape equipment was replaced on British subs in the late 60s by a suit with an integral clear airtight hood and no rebreather system

The idea of this equipment is not only "escape equipment" but also allowing crewmembers to breathe inside the boat for some time fighting fire\flooding. But down side of that is more complex design and potential dangers associated with pressurised oxygen tanks. No solution is perfect.

 

 

Our sub crews have separate equipment for that. Obviously it would mean changing from the one to the other to escape which is not great, but as you point out, no solution is perfect.


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