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#21 Rickard N

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Posted 27 August 2016 - 1618 PM

This is sort of fascinating, I installed a Linux Mint 18 this evening and installed alpine (sudo apt-get install alpine), started it and entered the above line with my gmail account as server and it just works... That's sort of good, but unfortunately it doesn't help me in helping you Murph :/

 

I had a bit of a hassle with the grub install and am not entirely pleased yet but now I can at least access both linux and windows. If you go through the setup again take some notes or screen dumps of the errors and I'll see what I can do.

 

/R


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#22 Murph

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Posted 27 August 2016 - 2131 PM

I think that there is something I am just missing.  Not sure what I am missing. 


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#23 Murph

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 1703 PM

I WON! I WON! I WON!  I managed to get Alpine up and running!!!!!  About 2/3rds was an issue with Google and Gmail, the other 1/3 was on my end, and I mis-configured the SMTP.  But I am sending mail successfully from Alpine.  The editing feature reminds me of Wordstar, and I loved Wordstar.  I had forgotten how nice a simple text/command line program could be.  I think I am going to like this.  Any good Linux references for the total N00b?


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#24 Rickard N

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 0542 AM

Depends on what you need.

For programs I did install emacs as an editor the first thing I did, then I installed TeXLive but that is probably overkill for you :D (TeXLive that is). I'm sort of used to XTerm so I installed that too, I haven't successfully changed the tray terminal shortcut to use XTerm instead though.

Gimp is good for editing images, I don't know if it's installed by default though.

 

Help pages, just search when you get stuck, most of the time you find something relevant and you will gradually get better at searching too.

 

/R


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#25 Murph

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 0638 AM

EMACS and VIM are Terra Incognita to me for the most part.  I haven't gotten that far yet, and I am really not sure what to do with them.  GIMP is ok, just not Photoshop (yet).  No idea what TeXLive is at all.  Sounds interesting.... 

Depends on what you need.

For programs I did install emacs as an editor the first thing I did, then I installed TeXLive but that is probably overkill for you :D (TeXLive that is). I'm sort of used to XTerm so I installed that too, I haven't successfully changed the tray terminal shortcut to use XTerm instead though.

Gimp is good for editing images, I don't know if it's installed by default though.

 

Help pages, just search when you get stuck, most of the time you find something relevant and you will gradually get better at searching too.

 

/R


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#26 sunday

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 1651 PM

Forget emacs and vi unless you must write code. Powerful, and lot of features, but overkill if not coding.


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#27 Murph

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 2049 PM

How about Pico or Nano as simple text editors?  Both remind me of Wordstar, which I loved in the early days of word processing.  Emacs and vi seem...odd, I am not really sure what I would use them for at all.  I don't code, so there is no need for me to use them at all.  Nano and Pico, on the other hand look ok for simple text files, and things like that.

Forget emacs and vi unless you must write code. Powerful, and lot of features, but overkill if not coding.


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#28 CT96

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Posted 29 August 2016 - 2153 PM

Got stymied trying to install mint 18 on a Toshiba Satellite C57D tonight. I guess it was actually working, but getting the UEFI drivers setup for the install was taking FOREVER. I abandoned the install tonight, and will try again later. Just didn't have the time/energy for it tonight.


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#29 sunday

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 0257 AM

 

How about Pico or Nano as simple text editors?  Both remind me of Wordstar, which I loved in the early days of word processing.  Emacs and vi seem...odd, I am not really sure what I would use them for at all.  I don't code, so there is no need for me to use them at all.  Nano and Pico, on the other hand look ok for simple text files, and things like that.

Forget emacs and vi unless you must write code. Powerful, and lot of features, but overkill if not coding.

 

 

A simple text editor would do. Only reason to learn basic use of vi was that it is installed by default in all unixes, so you could use it for initial setup, until having another, more user-friendly, editor installed.


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#30 Rickard N

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 0454 AM

I like emacs and think it's userfriendly for my everyday text-editing. I didn't like pico or nano last time I tried them which I admit is a loooong time ago. The thing with emacs is that you can do shitload of stuff with it and you can also use it for just editing your text. Since it's a graphic interface you get menues if you prefer that to using key commands. I've got it installed on all my windows machines too :)

 

If you like it or not is something entirely different but I wouldn't call it overkill since it's so quick to start. It's not like you're starting visual studio to edit text files.

 

TeX on the other hand IS overkill, liberoffice seems to come with linux mint and that will probably do your document handling. I started using TeX (or actually LaTeX) when I was in University, it wasn't very easy to get equations in the reports and LaTeX did that for me. Now I use it as a novelty, plus the result is actually quite pretty :)

 

/R


Edited by Rickard N, 30 August 2016 - 1522 PM.

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#31 Murph

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 0617 AM

Go here:https://forums.linuxmint.com/    They are super friendly, and have all the answers.  I go on there as MurphCID.

Got stymied trying to install mint 18 on a Toshiba Satellite C57D tonight. I guess it was actually working, but getting the UEFI drivers setup for the install was taking FOREVER. I abandoned the install tonight, and will try again later. Just didn't have the time/energy for it tonight.


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#32 CT96

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 2135 PM

Oh, it eventually worked. Spent all night downloading the 3rd party drivers for the UEFI install, but it worked. I just didn't have the patience to get it there that night.


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#33 Ivanhoe

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 2256 PM

TeX on the other hand IS overkill, liberoffice seems to come with linux mint and that will probably do your document handling. I started using TeX (or actually LaTeX) when I was in University, it wasn't very easy to get equations in the reports and LaTeX did that for me. Now I use it as a novelty, plus the result is actually quite pretty :)


You're admitting to being a TeXpunk. Probably sending .dvi files to your friends just to be a purist.  :P

 

p.s. if you enjoy playing around with distros, take a look at Zorin Core. I've created a VM in Hyper-V with it, looks good so far.


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#34 Rickard N

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 0157 AM

 

TeX on the other hand IS overkill, liberoffice seems to come with linux mint and that will probably do your document handling. I started using TeX (or actually LaTeX) when I was in University, it wasn't very easy to get equations in the reports and LaTeX did that for me. Now I use it as a novelty, plus the result is actually quite pretty :)


You're admitting to being a TeXpunk. Probably sending .dvi files to your friends just to be a purist.  :P

 

p.s. if you enjoy playing around with distros, take a look at Zorin Core. I've created a VM in Hyper-V with it, looks good so far.

 

I would NEVER send dvi:s to other, you never know if they have the correct fonts installed and it might look ... different :P

 

(i DID do the invitation to my wedding and the program in TeX though.... spent two nights installing fonts, it was worth it. I hope)

 

 

/R


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#35 Murph

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 1104 AM

Great that is good to hear.  I am sitting in a Starbucks waiting on my favorite Indian place to open, and writing emails in Alpine.  I am loving the command line, looking for a class on linux locally.  I don't need the Red Hat certifications, I just want a class on care and feeding of the linux box.  A little on Emacs, VIM, scripting, CLI, ect.  The nice thing is this little HP is so light and portable compared to my old Compaq luggable.  Plus battery life is wonderful.  Its almost worth drinking Starbucks crap coffee just to get out of the house with the laptop.  

 

 

Oh, it eventually worked. Spent all night downloading the 3rd party drivers for the UEFI install, but it worked. I just didn't have the patience to get it there that night.


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#36 CT96

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 1549 PM

I had a little fun with my wifi connection on my regular laptop (Alienware 17) today, but I setup dnsmasq and it pretty much all went away (I think this is more to do with the quality of the wifi access point than my system). Of course, I do computer for a living, so I have a clue of what to do when it goes wonky. I worry some about normal mortals on Linux in general, but less so with Mint.


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#37 Murph

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 1559 PM

I am one of those mortals, Linux is still very Terra Incognita for me as well.  

I had a little fun with my wifi connection on my regular laptop (Alienware 17) today, but I setup dnsmasq and it pretty much all went away (I think this is more to do with the quality of the wifi access point than my system). Of course, I do computer for a living, so I have a clue of what to do when it goes wonky. I worry some about normal mortals on Linux in general, but less so with Mint.


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#38 TTK Ciar

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 1624 PM

Android (which is a Linux distribution) demonstrates that Linux -can- be quite user-friendly. Most distributions have other priorities, is all.
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#39 CT96

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 1836 PM

Oh, I know. The other issue is that most people are used to the quirks of Windows, not that the Mint quirks are any worse than the Windows quirks, they're just different, and "new".

 

(new is a relative term. Having used linux in some form since before Windows 95 came out, I have seen quirks grow and shrink with each. Mint is the first that really seems to "get" it for the average user. I think.).


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#40 Rickard N

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Posted 03 September 2016 - 0651 AM

I'd say that Ubuntu is quite user friendly. I haven't fiddled with mint so much yet but it seems quite user friendly too. One of the main reasons I don't run linux as my default OS is that I use my computer pretty much for gaming...

 

/R


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