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#41 Typhoid Maxx

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 1636 PM

Most other recipes I had a look at on the net advocated bullion cubes and chicken stock. The meal I ate does not require that crap.
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#42 Rocky Davis

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 1711 PM

Basic recipe:

Brown 1/2 lb. lean ground beef in skillet. If you want onions, throw them in there when you brown the beef. Add garlic salt or salt-oriented "seasoning salt" and plenty of cracked black pepper. When the ground beef has been browned, lift the beef (and onions, if you added such) and place on a plate with a paper towel underneath to drain. Leave the meat juices in the skillet. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of flour to the grease left in the skillet and make a rue, stirring constantly. When the rue thickens, add milk and stir in and make your cream (white) gravy. Keep stirring. As the gravy starts to bubble, add the meat/onion mix back in. Add a few shakes of Worcestershire sauce. Reduce heat to medium and keep stirring. Add more cracked black pepper and seasoning or garlic salt to your taste . . . keep stirring! If it is to thick, add more milk and stir until desired thickness of gravy comes about.

Turn fire off and cover while you make toast OR pull hot biscuits out of the oven. Stir again before serving over the toast or biscuits.

Edited by Rocky Davis, 01 November 2009 - 1900 PM.

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#43 Michael Eastes

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 1837 PM

Hmmm...it depends. The tourist track isn't really London, and tends to be gimmicky.

London has quite sizable foreign cultural influence within it as any major western city

I could show you a few places were you'd think your mouth had died and gone to heaven. Not expensive places, either. .

But yes, the US definitively has had many, many good outcomes (from what I can see). Unfortunately the perception over here of that is negligible - America is culinary perceived by people as the nation of McDonald's (EVIL), Pizza Hut, Chicago's Deep pan, KFC...and that's about it.


I'm mainly talking about English-style food. The Chinese place we tried was very good ( when they found out that we were Americans, they removed us from the main part of the restaurant, and took us upstairs, where we were the only non-Asians in the room - I'm not sure why they took us to the "good part" of the place, but it worked out well for us ), and I understand that many ethnic places are quite good. We were short of cash, though, and budgeted more for books than food. We ate more pub food than anything else.

I'd love to go back to see London again, though, even if I was only allowed bangers and mash and the odd ploughman's lunch.

I doubt that you can find the real thing over there, but I'm willing to bet that you would appreciate Tex-Mex food.
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#44 Typhoid Maxx

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 1859 PM

I doubt that you can find the real thing over there, but I'm willing to bet that you would appreciate Tex-Mex food.


You got me figured straight.

As for the English food - pub food is English style food, emphasis on the style, rather than English...or even food. Mash potato from a bag, gravy granules, water filled "sausages" and chips from a frozen economy bag...Britain's version of cheep and cheerful, and not even that popular any more. Hardly surprising.

A well prepared leg of lamb, with garlic and Rosemary, and roast potatoes coated in goose fat with homemade gravy from the drippings, a Beef Wellington or a Yorkshire hot pot are all wonders to be consumed with delight; sadly, few places make them for public consumption, or make them well.
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#45 Mike Steele

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 2151 PM

You got me figured straight.

......
A well prepared leg of lamb, with garlic and Rosemary, and roast potatoes coated in goose fat with homemade gravy from the drippings, a Beef Wellington or a Yorkshire hot pot are all wonders to be consumed with delight; sadly, few places make them for public consumption, or make them well.


That sounds like my mothers cooking.....Hummmmm ;)
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#46 Michael Eastes

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 0205 AM

You got me figured straight.

As for the English food - pub food is English style food, emphasis on the style, rather than English...or even food. Mash potato from a bag, gravy granules, water filled "sausages" and chips from a frozen economy bag...Britain's version of cheep and cheerful, and not even that popular any more. Hardly surprising.

A well prepared leg of lamb, with garlic and Rosemary, and roast potatoes coated in goose fat with homemade gravy from the drippings, a Beef Wellington or a Yorkshire hot pot are all wonders to be consumed with delight; sadly, few places make them for public consumption, or make them well.


Our visit was in '78, so the pub food might have been a bit better, then. I was happy enough with it- I just couldn't figure out why everything, including a breakfast omlette, came with a side dish of peas.

I am definitely a lover of well-cooked lamb, but since my wife is 1/2 Armenian, we have it middle eastern style, instead of the British way, most often. My grandmother used to turn out a roast beef with Yorkshire pudding and gravy that makes me feel sad to remember, since I can never have it again from her kitchen. I also like beef Wellington, although I haven't seen it on a menu here in over 30 years. Maybe I just can't afford the sort of places that make it properly.

If you've never had TexMex food, we really must get you across the Atlantic sometime. There are good places for it even up here nowadays, but for the Real Deal™, you need to check out my old home state of Texas. I'm sure that Rocky or Murph could take you to a proper place.
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#47 ShotMagnet

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 1302 PM

My last visit was in '93, the food was as described. I did take a shine to Scotch eggs, but that was it.

I'm not particularly fussy about this sort of thing, either. So long as you don't put offal in front of me, I'll probably eat it. Still, 'to everything there is a season...' and so on, which is to say that:

1) Corn does not belong on pizza;

2) Sauce with your spaghetti is a requirement, not an option;

3) A 'cake' is something that has been baked, which a Chorley (spelling uncertain) Cake isn't and therefore doesn't qualify as a cake.


As for SOS, watch the flour carefully. What you're doing is creating a roux; what you want to avoid is letting the flour get too brown. You want what they call a blonde roux; you're attempting to control the caramelization of the sugars in the flour, the darker it gets the more the sugars have caramelized. You don't want it to get dark, you want it light so that the cream sauce you're creating will itself be light in color. It probably won't adversely affect the taste if you let the roux get too dark, but it won't look right.

Don't skip the onions, and don't think of them as an option. They're a requirement, and if you somehow manage to throw in some (not too much) garlic paste I can't see how that would hurt the matter.


Shot
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#48 Typhoid Maxx

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 1545 PM

Lean pork, red onions, flour, garlic salt, paprika, plenty of crushed black pepper, made creamy. Just finished a batch, served on brown bread.

Just the right level of spicy hot, but with layers of taste to it. Good stuff, its a keeper (though doubtless what I'm making isn't exactly right).
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#49 Harold Jones

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 1552 PM

If it tastes good to you and the people you serve it to it's right. That it might or might not taste exactly like the creamed beef the Panzer Kaserne mess hall served in 1990 really doesn't enter into it.
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#50 Typhoid Maxx

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 1606 PM

Oh Amen to that; just saying.
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#51 Corinthian

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 2223 PM

Come the 15th, I will go to the market and buy the SOS ingredients, make a batch, and eat for breakfast. And I blame all of you on this thread for that.

MWUHAHAHAHAHA

:D
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#52 Harold Jones

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 2234 PM

Come the 15th, I will go to the market and buy the SOS ingredients, make a batch, and eat for breakfast. And I blame all of you on this thread for that.

MWUHAHAHAHAHA

:D



To truly replicate the experience I recommend that you stay up all night before cooking the SOS. After you've filled your plate take it outside and eat standing up with the plate on the hood of your car. You get extra points if it's raining at the time.
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#53 capt_starlight

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Posted 02 November 2009 - 2328 PM

Some traditions are worth keeping. "Mess hall" is much more evocative.

"Dining facility" sounds like it belongs on a cruise ship, somehow...


And "Mess" has a totally different meaning in the BritComm Navies from that in the BritComM Armies and Air Forces.......
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#54 Geoff Winnington-Ball

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 0718 AM

To truly replicate the experience I recommend that you stay up all night before cooking the SOS. After you've filled your plate take it outside and eat standing up with the plate on the hood of your car. You get extra points if it's raining at the time.


:lol: :lol: :lol:
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#55 Typhoid Maxx

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 1800 PM

Come the 15th, I will go to the market and buy the SOS ingredients, make a batch, and eat for breakfast. And I blame all of you on this thread for that.

MWUHAHAHAHAHA

:D


TomasCCT - try it out on mashed potato's. Better than meatball sauce.
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#56 Mike Steele

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 1806 PM

To truly replicate the experience I recommend that you stay up all night before cooking the SOS. After you've filled your plate take it outside and eat standing up with the plate on the hood of your car. You get extra points if it's raining at the time.


Double extra points if you can get it to snow/be freezing, and be in mud up to your behind. ;)
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#57 Michael Eastes

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 1844 PM

To truly replicate the experience I recommend that you stay up all night before cooking the SOS. After you've filled your plate take it outside and eat standing up with the plate on the hood of your car. You get extra points if it's raining at the time.


One of the most memorable meals of my life was in the field at Ft. Polk in December of '71. Cold pancakes, eggs, and bacon, with tepid coffee- with freezing rain, and icicles forming on my mess kit and helmet rim.

Not good food, but hard to forget.
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#58 R011

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 1906 PM

Come the 15th, I will go to the market and buy the SOS ingredients, make a batch, and eat for breakfast. And I blame all of you on this thread for that.

MWUHAHAHAHAHA

:D

Just finished cooking and eating a batch. I used the recipe Harold Jones posted on Page 1 (post #4) with some Worcestershire sauce and garlic powder like Rocky Davis suggested. Not bad. I'll be doing it again soon.
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#59 Typhoid Maxx

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 2144 PM

Don't forget the paprika - it does make a difference (least it did with the pork mince).

Next - chipped beef.
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#60 Murph

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 0842 AM

You must use the chipped dried beef in SOS, it makes it better IMO.
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