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Cold War, The Reimagined Series


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#8021 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 18 November 2019 - 0758 AM

https://www.edp24.co...h-sea-1-6379086 US and RAF aircraft in North Sea Point Blank exercise

The recurring Point Blank exercise, which on Thursday included 35 aircraft from 10 units, aims to hone how allies will fight in real world operations.

Among those taking part were a United States Air Force (USAF) CV-22 Osprey, which can take off and land like a helicopter but has aeroplane-style wings.

The tiltrotor aircraft, which can carry up to 32 troops and has a machine gun on its ramp, was refuelled over the North Sea from an MC-130J Commando II.

The cargo plane, based at RAF Mildenhall in Suffolk, flies clandestine or low-visibility refuelling missions for special operations helicopters and tiltrotor aircraft, and can bring troops and supplies in and out of warzones.

During the exercise it was in turn refuelled from a KC-135 Stratotanker refueller plane.

The US aircraft were joined by UK Typhoon fighter jets from RAF airbases at Coningsby in Lincolnshire and Lossiemouth in Scotland, which also took part in the exercise.


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#8022 glenn239

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Posted 21 November 2019 - 1438 PM

A CN rail strike is on here in Canada, (the second major line CP is not effected).  Already propane supplies in Quebec are running out,

 

https://www.msn.com/...ocid=spartandhp

 

The effects of service freezes economically will soon cascade to massive.  This is the concern we have to have for rail lines in wartime, except of course that a rail strike can be solved with workers going back to work, whereas if a few dozen crucial bridges are knocked out, we're screwed.


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#8023 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 0309 AM

https://www.bbc.co.u...europe-50512099

The Serbian president has said his country's security services have uncovered spying by Russian agents.

Aleksandar Vucic confirmed a Russian intelligence official had a meeting with a retired Serbian military officer during which money changed hands.

A YouTube video of the December meeting surfaced at the weekend.

Mr Vucic said his officials had also found evidence of 10 other contacts between Russian agents and Serbian officers.

But he insisted these incidents would not affect Serbia's close relations with Russia. He said he was sure President Vladimir Putin was not informed about the actions of the Russian agents.

 

 

The video appears to show a Russian intelligence officer giving money to a Serbian man in Belgrade. The pair also visit a bar.

The Russian is identified as Lt-Col Georgy Kleban, a former assistant military attache at Russia's embassy in Belgrade, greeting a retired Serbian army officer identified only as ZK.

The video was not made by Serbian agents and the president did not disclose who filmed it.

 

What did the president say?

"On several occasions, Serbian security agencies gathered audio and video evidence of contacts between Lt-Col Kleban and members of the Serbian army," Mr Vucic told a news conference.

Efforts to carry out video surveillance of the pair by Serbian agents were hampered due to the Russian having his own protection detail, he added.

But Serbian agents had evidence concerning other Russian spies, the president said.

"There have been 10 contacts with three sources," he said.

He insisted the episode would not sour strong relations between the allies.

"We will not change our policy towards Russia, which we see as a brotherly and friendly country... but we will strengthen our own intelligence defences," Mr Vucic said.

"There was only thing I have asked the Russian ambassador today - I've only asked him - Why?"

 

Yeah, right.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, 22 November 2019 - 0313 AM.

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#8024 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 0321 AM

https://www.express....s-war-games-spt

But more worryingly for NATO allies, Mr Axe highlights that while Russian military aims to practice defensive strategy, it is also audaciously sending subs into Western waters.

Norwegian intelligence services reported that “The aim of the massive operation is to get as far out to the North Atlantic as possible without being discovered by NATO.”

 

Mr Axe also highlights that while the exercises are defensive in nature, the same submarines being used could hypothetically launch attacks from the same locations.

 

The ease with which Russian military can enter NATO waters will provoke concern among many as the Kremlin consolidates its presence in the Arctic region.

The Arctic is a contested region due to its emerging, accessible natural resources which are becoming easier to extract due to melting ice. Russia, the US and China are competing for influence in the region, with Russia’s war games the latest in a long line of attempts to mark its authority.

Swathes of Russia’s Arctic seas were closed off for huge nuclear war games starting in October as five submarines, more than 100 aircraft, 200 missile launchers and 12,000 Russian troops prepared to take part in the exercise, Moscow’s Defence Ministry stated.


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#8025 JasonJ

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 0404 AM

Huge nuclear war games... Jpn cant into those :(
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#8026 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 0447 AM

Yeah, but you have Godzilla on your side.

 

https://www.neweurop...ational-domain/

NATO foreign ministers have formally declared space as an “operational domain”, at a meeting in Brussels on 20 November.

The announcement is a response to growing concerns over protecting satellite and navigation assets from enemy interference, as it will make the alliance battle-ready on land, air, sea, computer networks and space.

The alliance plans to research space threats that could be identified as military threats. NATO’s secretary-general, Jens Stoltenberg, assured that the alliance has no intention to put weapons in space or develop its own space-based capabilities.

“Making space an operational domain will help us ensure all aspects are taken into account to ensure the success of our missions”, Stoltenberg stated.

The alliance will also prepare a new policy to defend its members against the military ambitions of China, who has the second-largest defence budget, after the United States, and is developing weapons it could use in orbit. Russia is also conquering space, as one of the few countries able to launch satellites into orbit.

“Space is part of our daily life here on Earth. It can be used for peaceful purposes. But it can also be used aggressively. Satellites can be jammed, hacked or weaponized. Anti-satellite weapons could cripple communications and other services our societies rely on, such as air travel, weather forecast or banking”, Stoltenberg said.


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#8027 bojan

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 0645 AM

Internally manufactured affair, to cover up whole Krusik mess.


Edited by bojan, 22 November 2019 - 0646 AM.

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#8028 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 22 November 2019 - 0857 AM

This is from exercise Spring Storm 2019, which occurred back in May. For some reason I missed it at the time.


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#8029 Dark_Falcon

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Posted 27 November 2019 - 0600 AM

A blast from the Cold War past that's interesting to watch:

 


Edited by Dark_Falcon, 27 November 2019 - 0600 AM.

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#8030 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 27 November 2019 - 0610 AM

That Hind in particular was, at least till the early 2000's, was still in use by the US Army in the OPFOR role. It may well still be, im not quite sure.

 

Funnily enough there was a bastardized version of this story in the Craig Thomas story 'Winter Hawk', where Mitchel Gant uses a stolen Hind (this time stolen in Syria) to get into the Soviet Union. So Ive a feeling this must have been vaguely known even in the 1980's.

 

Ive also read of a CIA effort to recover wreckage from a Soviet bomber crash in Africa that was, believe it or not, located fairly accurately apparently, via the CIA's Stargate remote viewer programme. But I cant recall whether it was a Bear or a Backfire bomber.


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#8031 Josh

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Posted 27 November 2019 - 1523 PM

Do you have a link for that?
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#8032 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 28 November 2019 - 0228 AM

The bit about the remote  viewing was in a recent Spycat podcast. Supposedly they got the location within 10 miles IIRC.

https://www.spymuseu...the-paranormal/

 

Ive actually been searching for the bit on the bomber and im damned if I can find any links of it. Which annoys the hell out of me, because ive read of this several times. Like Operation Jennifer, there never seems to be any discussion of what exactly they recovered. Ill keep looking, they might have something on the CIA FOIA website.

 

I think it must have been a Backfire. If it was a Bear, they could just have easily looked in a hangar in Canada, because they had a complete one....


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#8033 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 28 November 2019 - 0253 AM

Looking at the CIA FOIA website, the ONLY article I can find on it was a spectacularly ill informed newspaper article that refered to a 'Tu95 Backfire'.

 

Its a strange one, its long been hinted to in the press, but never anything afirmative written. But then there wasnt anything written about the Hind, till it was, soo....


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#8034 glenn239

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Posted 28 November 2019 - 0843 AM

Turkey began testing its S-400 this month against its own F-16's,

 

https://www.telegrap...t-russia-fresh/

 

Result is that Turkey is buying more S-400's.


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#8035 BansheeOne

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 0604 AM

NATO estimate on 2019 defense expenditures is out. Familiar picture: Expenditures of non-US members have risen, and are back to the 1989 total in 2015 dollars (though of course NATO was smaller then) - but so have US expenditures. Thus the relation between both has only shifted slightly from a non-US share of 26.5 percent in 2013 to 30.5 this year; and actually it was slightly higher in 2018 before a rather substantial increase of American expenditures. If the US would have simply let its partners take up the slack and remained at its most recent low in 2017, the share would be up to 32.5 percent now.

 

But then as always, a large part of American spending is for other than NATO's immediate interests. From what I can find here and here, the US generally spent 70-75 percent of the total until 1972, when it first dropped below that mark with the Vietnam drawdown. It further fell through the 70s; the closest both sides came to parity was in 1980, when the US spent 54 percent of the total. Under Reagan, it jumped up to over 70 percent again, then went back down to about 60 until GWB, where after an initial rise to 65 it really took off following 9/11.

 

20191129_NATO_Ausgaben_US_vs_Eur.jpg

 

fig1.png

 

Interesting detail: per capita, after the US it's Norway of all places which spends most on defense despite using only 1.80 percent of its GDP, even before the UK with 2.14 percent; and Denmark (1.32) is in third place, ahead of France (1.84). Which might be a function of small populations; but then the tiny Baltic States only spend about half as much, even though they are now all slightly above the two-percent GDP target.

 

So this points to a difference in domestic cost levels, probably not least for soldiers' pay to compete with local higher civilian wages/cost of life. Compared to other West European countries, Denmark and Norway (like the UK) also aren't in the Eurozone, so exchange rates of local currencies might make procurement more expensive. All of which goes to show that there are factors other than GDP to consider when comparing expenditures.

 

20191129_NATO_Ausgaben_pro-Kopf.jpg


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#8036 glenn239

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 1029 AM

Russia demonstrates hypersonic warhead to US inspectors,

 

https://www.military...-us-inspectors/

 

Stated that the system is operational in December.


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#8037 Daan

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Posted 30 November 2019 - 1030 AM

The Danish Krone is pegged to the Euro.
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#8038 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 03 December 2019 - 1413 PM

Woodpecker redux.
https://www.thedrive...e-arctic-region
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#8039 JasonJ

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Posted Today, 12:20 AM

Navies of South Africa, Russia, and China conducted joint-training in South African waters in late November. Two warships from SA, two from Russa, and one, a Type 54A frigate, from China.
Spoiler
https://tass.com/defense/1093747/amp

Edited by JasonJ, Today, 12:21 AM.

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