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#5981 RETAC21

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Posted Yesterday, 07:18 AM

So I finally got lost into this Brexit thing: what's next, another extension until when? Hard Brexit 31sy Oct? Norman invasion?


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#5982 Der Zeitgeist

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Posted Yesterday, 07:32 AM

So I finally got lost into this Brexit thing: what's next, another extension until when? Hard Brexit 31sy Oct? Norman invasion?

 

Currently, it seems pretty safe to say that the UK will still be a member state of the EU on November 1st.

 

Apart from that, in the coming days there's probably going to be a ton of arcane legal stuff in British courts that I haven't got any clue of. 


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#5983 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted Yesterday, 08:28 AM

If the EU reject the letter, expect legal action against Bojo for not taking parliament seriously. The Scots might do it anyway, to validate how important they are.

 

If the EU accept the latter, then we will kick over into another extension obviously. But it seems as if that it may only be a short while before we bring the Bojo deal to Parliament. I think it likely it will be defeated again, because as we saw with the DUP gone, he has no hope of winning, and there isnt enough independents on his side to help him. Bojo just isnt trusted, so all the goodwill he might have had he pissed away on the prorogation malarky.

 

Where do we go next? Absolutely no idea. I lost my footing when Theresa May lost the vote 15 times. I would guess probably we will have an election, followed by a second referendum. But thats just a guess on my part.


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#5984 Chris Werb

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Posted Yesterday, 02:59 PM

Will someone please prod me when it's all over?


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#5985 Ssnake

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Posted Yesterday, 04:16 PM

Define "over". There's always going to be the next morning. History is the longest running daily soap, and for as long as there will be daily soaps (and some time beyond), History will keep running irrespective of the ratings that each show will get.


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#5986 Der Zeitgeist

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Posted Today, 12:08 AM

I think a lot of people, especially in the UK, don't realize yet that if Brexit by some miracle really is "done" in the next few weeks, the whole thing won't be "over" by a long time, because the difficult work will only just begin then.

 

After Brexit, the UK would only have about one year to negotiate a free trade agreement with the EU, a time limit which is quite "sportlich", as we say over here (free trade deals normally take years to negotiate). If they fail to get the FTA passed in parliament or wherever, there's the next "no deal" scenario right there. Of course, the transition period that goes until December 2020 could be extended if the UK asks for an extension. You see where I'm going here. Mr. Barnier will be waiting for your call.  ^_^


Edited by Der Zeitgeist, Today, 12:15 AM.

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#5987 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted Today, 04:13 AM


 
Indeed. Hotel California (Europa?) still applies.
Labour seeks new alliance to kill off Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal

Labour approaches Tory rebels and DUP in bid to force through amendments to PM’s deal

 

Boris Johnson’s hopes of winning a clear majority for his Brexit plan faced a new threat on Sunday night as Labour declared that it would seek the backing of rebel Tories and the DUP for amendments that would force him to drop the deal – or accept a softer Brexit.

As both sides sought to gather parliamentary support after Saturday’s vote to force Johnson to seek a new delay to the UK’s departure from the European Union, Sir Keir Starmer, the shadow Brexit secretary, said Labour was prepared to talk to the prime minister’s former allies in the Democratic Unionist party (DUP) about forging a better deal.

The news raises the prospect that a new parliamentary alliance could form at the 11th hour – forcing the government into a softer departure from the EU or a confirmatory vote on whether to leave at all.


Edited by Stuart Galbraith, Today, 04:16 AM.

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#5988 Der Zeitgeist

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Posted Today, 08:28 AM

The Times makes a pretty important point here, that I was mentioning earlier:

https://www.thetimes...nning-dj3rk590x

 

EHZMRWiXkAAucr2.jpg


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#5989 seahawk

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Posted Today, 09:40 AM

That is why, only a hard Brexit makes sense. It ends all talks instantly and frees Britain from the shackles of the EU.


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#5990 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted Today, 09:45 AM

Yes, instead of waiting a year to achieve penury, we achieve it overnight.


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#5991 Panzermann

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Posted Today, 10:33 AM

The Times makes a pretty important point here, that I was mentioning earlier:

https://www.thetimes...nning-dj3rk590x

 

EHZMRWiXkAAucr2.jpg

 

Not surprising with the libraries (no, that is not hyperbole) of regulations and treaties that have to be adjusted, amended, changed etc. pp. ad nauseam. That HM government has fiddled their thumbs the last three years did not help this along one step either.  Considering the effective and quick handling of the negotiations pertaining the Brexit agreement, the coming negotiations are going to be a cakewalk and rubber stamping for sure. 

 

 

 

That is why, only a hard Brexit makes sense. It ends all talks instantly and frees Britain from the shackles of the EU.

 

The reality is that the bigger neighbour dominates the smaller neighbour. See Switzerland. On paper sovereign and not in the EU. Switzerland can make its own laws and regulations. In reality lots of stuff is done the EU way, because otherwise it cannot be exported into the EU.  Same for Norway, Iceland... They all have no input in these regulations one way or another, but have to follow them.


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