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Bestest Korea Icbm Test Launch


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#2101 Josh

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Posted 24 July 2019 - 1444 PM

I believe the nearest Soviet analog was the Golf class.


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#2102 JasonJ

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 0751 AM

DPRK launched two short range BMs again, last time was a few days ago. They flew 155 for miles.

https://www.npr.org/...-test-in-a-week


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#2103 Josh

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Posted 31 July 2019 - 1134 AM

I suspect those Juche bags will launch short range missiles regularly until they get what they want or feel the need to escalate to MRBMs to ramp up pressure on the US administration.


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#2104 JasonJ

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 0655 AM

I suspect those Juche bags will launch short range missiles regularly until they get what they want or feel the need to escalate to MRBMs to ramp up pressure on the US administration.

 

Looks like it, they went for a third salvo now.

https://www.bbc.com/...d-asia-49199157


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#2105 Nobu

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 0752 AM

Japan's response to Korean missile diplomacy did not take long.

 

Japan Imposes Broad New Trade Restrictions on South Korea

 

By Ben Dooley and Choe Sang-Hun

 

The New York Times

 

Aug. 1, 2019

 

TOKYO — Japan on Friday moved to increase controls on the export of a broad assortment of products to South Korea, dramatically raising the stakes in a political standoff that has plunged relations between the countries to their lowest point in decades and that has caused worries in Washington.

 

Japanese officials said they would remove South Korea from a “white list” of countries that receive preferential treatment on requirements for the import of sensitive Japanese-made goods. The move could slow imports of ball bearings, precision machine tools and other products that are essential to South Korea’s technology industry.

 

The removal will take effect on Aug. 28, Japanese officials said, leaving both sides room to cool tensions.

 

South Korea’s president, Moon Jae-in, condemned the move, which he said was aimed at sabotaging South Korea’s economy as it struggles with slowing growth. South Korean officials said they would remove Japan from their own white list, without offering details.

 

“If Japan intentionally hurts our economy, it will also have to suffer big damage,” Mr. Moon said after convening an emergency cabinet meeting, adding that “we will never again lose to Japan.”

 

The dispute has spooked global markets, with investors fearing the restrictions could upset the flow of critical electronic components from South Korea to the world’s factories. And it has drawn in the United States government, which has become increasingly concerned that the contretemps between two of its most important allies could increase China’s influence in the region and weaken Washington’s hand in negotiations with North Korea.

 

South Korea said on Friday that it is considering pulling out of an intelligence-sharing deal that the two countries signed in 2016 at Washington’s urging. The agreement allows the two allies of the United States to share intelligence on North Korea, such as tracking data on ballistic missiles fired by the North. If that agreement is abrogated, it would be the clearest sign yet that the festering dispute was undermining the United States’ efforts to expand a security partnership with South Korea and Japan.

 

“Our government will take comprehensive countermeasures, including reviewing whether it is appropriate to share sensitive military intelligence with a country that does not trust us and raises security-related problems,” said Kim Hyun-chong, a deputy national security adviser to Mr. Moon.

 

Tokyo says it has taken the measures because of unspecified national security concerns linked to the mishandling of materials with potential military applications by South Korean firms. Seoul says the restrictions are aimed at pressuring it to resolve outstanding disputes over the legacy of Japan’s occupation of the Korean Peninsula.

Japanese officials played down the potential impact on the global technology industry.

 

“We think that there will be basically no effect on global supply chains, or adverse impact on Japanese business,” Hiroshige Seko, the Japanese minister of the economy and industry, told reporters after the announcement.

 

South Korea’s removal from the white list follows a decision by Japan in early July to tighten controls on exports to the country of several chemicals used in the production of advanced semiconductors and digital flat screens — pillars of the South Korean economy. The decision required Japanese companies to apply for a license to export the chemicals to South Korean customers, a process that could take up to 90 days.

 

Japanese officials have said that the decision and the subsequent removal of South Korea from the white list were a last-resort response to Seoul’s refusal to engage in repeated requests for discussions about the mishandling of sensitive exports. They have declined to give specific examples of those concerns.

 

South Korea disputes that account. Choi Youngbae, minister-counselor at the South Korean Embassy in Tokyo, said South Korea has agreed to meet with Japanese government counterparts but that Japan has not responded to requests for such meetings. South Korea has raised the restrictions on chemicals with the global trade watchdog, the World Trade Organization.

 

“They are saying they have lost trust in us,” Mr. Choi said. “But we have lost our trust of them on this matter.”

 

Tensions over Japan’s rule over the Korean Peninsula from 1910 until its surrender at the end of World War II in 1945 have been a perennial thorn in relations between the two countries. But the usual cycle of recriminations has escalated since South Korea’s Supreme Court ruled that victims of forced labor during the period had the right to seek compensation from Japanese companies.

 

The decision drew a strong protest from Japan, which has long held that all claims from the colonial era had been settled by a 1965 agreement that reestablished diplomatic ties between the countries and provided Seoul with $500 million in aid, money which was used by the country’s government to build up its economy.

 

When Japan last month tightened controls of chemicals sold to South Korea, officials insisted the action was not connected to South Korea’s handling of historical issues. But in Seoul, the move was seen as a warning shot: If the South Korean government refused to make the labor issue disappear, Tokyo would kneecap one of the country’s main industries.

 

The restrictions unveiled on Friday in Japan are unlikely to have a major effect on South Korea’s economy or global supply chains more broadly, according to Masahiko Hosokawa, a former Japanese official who worked on the country’s export system.

 

Moving forward, export contracts for certain goods with potential military applications will have to be approved by the Japanese government, he said, adding that Tokyo puts the same requirement on selling to places like Taiwan and China, which also have large electronics industries that source components and materials from Japan. The process of sorting out the licenses will only take a few weeks, he added.

 

The concerns are “exaggerated,” he said.

 

Industry experts also suggested that South Korean companies would find ways to deal with the delays and added costs that the white list removal will cause. The removal is “not a ban on exports,” said Sanjeev Rana, an expert on the semiconductor industry at CLSA, a brokerage. “Companies can eventually adjust. But it’s going to take a little bit of paperwork and time.”

 

How long is not clear. Companies have had time to prepare for the decision. Japan announced it was considering removing South Korea from the white list at the beginning of July.

 

Still, sorting out what products will be affected can be a time-consuming process, especially for high-tech firms. The average mobile phone, for example, includes hundreds of components. Manufacturers will have to check each one to see whether it was imported from Japan and, if so, whether its supplier will need government approval to continue shipping it.

 

Export approvals, too, may not come as quickly as Mr. Hosokawa suggests. A month after Japan’s first round of tightening regulations, major electronics manufacturers have still not received shipments of the three chemicals involved, according to an industry source who asked to speak anonymously to discuss private corporate information.

 

The measures may also hurt Japanese companies. Mr. Moon said on Friday that South Korea would reduce its dependence on Japanese technologies and materials by finding alternative sources for imports and providing financial and other support for South Korean manufacturers to produce products locally.

 

Regardless of the practical effects of the ban, the political fallout has been intense.

 

South Korean public opinion is quickly souring on Japan. Proposed boycotts of Japanese products and tourism could be damaging. In mid-July, a man angry over the first round of trade restrictions set himself on fire in front of the Japanese Embassy in Seoul. A second, similar incident occurred Thursday.

 

“I have not seen it this bad in all my whole career,” said Mr. Choi, the minister-counselor at the South Korean Embassy in Tokyo, who has spent 23 years as a diplomat.

 

In Washington, concern is growing that fallout from the dispute could affect cooperation and military readiness between two American allies, according to Celeste Arrington, an expert on Japanese and South Korean politics at George Washington University.

 

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is expected to meet with both Kang Kyung-wha, South Korea’s foreign minister, and Taro Kono, the Japanese foreign minister, in Bangkok on Friday.

 

The disagreement could “endanger sustained U.S. efforts on North Korea,” Ms. Arrington said, noting that arriving at a deal with North Korea would ultimately require cooperation from both Tokyo and Seoul.


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#2106 JasonJ

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 0803 AM

It'll be interesting to see how gdp growth rates, foreign reserve stocks, and currency strength turn out from this. Although the US-China trade friction will also partially be a factor.


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#2107 urbanoid

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 0810 AM

South Korean public opinion is quickly souring on Japan. Proposed boycotts of Japanese products and tourism could be damaging. In mid-July, a man angry over the first round of trade restrictions set himself on fire in front of the Japanese Embassy in Seoul. A second, similar incident occurred Thursday.

 

Now that's fucking autistic.


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#2108 Nobu

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 0836 AM

Harsh, but accurate in various ways. Sadly for him and copycats like him, Japanese trade restrictions against Korea, as well as Japan and Japanese themselves, will carry on regardless.


Edited by Nobu, 02 August 2019 - 0837 AM.

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#2109 Nobu

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Posted 03 August 2019 - 1636 PM

The Japanese ambassador has now been summoned by the Korean foreign ministry to notify him that Japan is no longer considered to be a friendly nation.

If North Korea' s missile diplomacy is truly aimed at the South, Seoul appears singularly unconcerned by it, almost as if it knows it is not the intended target of it.
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#2110 urbanoid

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 0346 AM

North Korea's missile diplomacy is aimed at everyone, enemies and 'allies' alike.


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#2111 JasonJ

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Posted 05 August 2019 - 1913 PM

DPRK launched another pair of BMs.

The primary aim of these recent BM launches seem to be against the US-ROK joint-training currently going on.
Spoiler
https://www.theguard...o-take-new-road

Edited by JasonJ, 05 August 2019 - 1915 PM.

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#2112 Nobu

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 0041 AM

North Korea's missile diplomacy does not appear to be having much of an effect on this Moon.

 

South Korea’s president calls for ‘peace economy’ with North Korea amid Japan trade war

 

August 5, 2019

 

By Kim Tong-Hyung / The Associated Press

 

South Korea’s president on Monday described the country’s escalating trade warwith Japan as a wake-up call to revamp its economy and issued a nationalistic call for economic cooperation with North Korea, which he said would allow the Koreas to erase Japan’s economic superiority in “one burst.”

 

President Moon Jae-in made the comments in a meeting with senior aides to discuss Japan’s imposition of trade curbs on South Korea. They came as a surprise since North Korea has raised tensions in recent weeks with tests of new short-range weapons that pose a threat to South Korea’s security.

 

“The advantage Japan’s economy has over us is the size of its (overall) economy and domestic market. If the South and North could create a peace economy through economic cooperation, we can catch up with Japan’s superiority in one burst,” Moon said in the meeting at Seoul’s presidential Blue House.

 

“Japan absolutely cannot prevent our economy from taking a leap. Rather, (Japan) will serve as a stimulant that strengthens our determination to become an economic power,” he said…


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#2113 urbanoid

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Posted 06 August 2019 - 0231 AM

Ah, so the US is supposed to defend them from North Korea while they engage in integration with them. 


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#2114 Josh

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 1209 PM

I still think the North's predominant political target is the Trump administration. The more often they fire, the less his assurances that everything is ok and dandy on the penisula seems plausible.

Of course what that misses is that Trump himself so dominates the news cycle that these missile tests have no effect. I predict within a month or two medium or intermediate range missiles are fired along a more aggressive trajectory to try to grab more media attention.


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#2115 glenn239

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 1245 PM

Ah, so the US is supposed to defend them from North Korea while they engage in integration with them. 

 

One point of difference is that South Korea does not appear to share the US concern with NK's development of long range ballistic missiles.  From Seoul's point of view, who cares how far the missile can strike when they're already in range of NK's shorter ranged missiles?  


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#2116 glenn239

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 1255 PM

I still think the North's predominant political target is the Trump administration. The more often they fire, the less his assurances that everything is ok and dandy on the penisula seems plausible.

Of course what that misses is that Trump himself so dominates the news cycle that these missile tests have no effect. I predict within a month or two medium or intermediate range missiles are fired along a more aggressive trajectory to try to grab more media attention.

 

Looked more to me that in the absence of NK long range missile testing, the US media started drawing attention to short range missile testing, for domestic political reasons, to make Trump's policy look like a failure.

 

In terms of NK policy, common sense would assume that as the 2020 election approaches, North Korea would anticipate that Trump's desire to reach a deal to effect the election will increase.  If, as you surmise, they start testing long range missiles again, surely this would be poking with a stick to get that deal Trump would need before election day 2020?  


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#2117 Josh

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Posted 07 August 2019 - 1516 PM

For whatever reason the DPRK seems to have a sense of urgency in removing at least some of the economic sanctions. The short range missiles don't particularly concern the US and don't move the needle in US politics. Give the number of recent firing and the total lack of any diplomatic effect, I predict that they will escalate sooner rather than later. They will avoid ICBM and nuclear tests for the moment (it's not clear their nuclear test site is stable enough to sustain another test anyway), but they will likely test missiles that can either reach other US allies in addition to the ROK or, more likely IMO, something with sufficient range to reach Guam. That is my prediction based on their previous behavior. As to why they are doing it, it seems likely they consider Trump a more malleable negotiator despite the failure of the last meeting, in that he's actually met with Kim and also has opened himself up to potential criticism by publicly stating North Korea is no longer a nuclear threat. So they likely want to try to force a deal while they are sure he is still president. As to putting pressure on Trump to force a deal before 2020, that may be their goal, but realistically nothing short of very aggressive move - ICBM test, nuclear test, test off the coast of Guam - will significantly move the needle in the US election. The US voting populace cares very little about foreign policy relative to domestic policy, and most of the US has already made its decision regarding voting for Trump vs voting for anyone but Trump. So there is a lot of room for miscalculations on the Korean side.


Edited by Josh, 07 August 2019 - 1522 PM.

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#2118 JasonJ

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 2208 PM

DPRK launched missiles again on August 16th, 6th time since July 25th, but all have been short range types, but new types. Picture of this time's around.

dprk6thtimesince725.jpg

Spoiler

http://www.koreahera...=20190816000439

 

That latest launch was under the guidance of Fat-Kim.

fat-kimguidance.jpg

Spoiler
http://www.koreahera...=20190817000023
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#2119 JasonJ

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 2212 PM

DPRK media criticizing ROK and the US because of their military joint-exercise going on.

Spoiler
http://www.koreahera...=20190818000013
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#2120 Nobu

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Posted 17 August 2019 - 2225 PM

The short range missiles don't particularly concern the US and don't move the needle in US politics. 

 

That could in fact be a feature, not a bug, particularly when their southern brethren are embroiled in a war of policies with Japan and Japanese. Such missile launches could be interpreted as solidarity between Koreans in various ways. 


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