Jump to content


Photo

Because China

kangaroo

  • Please log in to reply
87 replies to this topic

#21 Nobu

Nobu

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,132 posts

Posted 30 August 2018 - 2113 PM

China is trying to muzzle Sankei the same way Abe has been trying to muzzle Asahi in various ways for the past 3 years.

 

I don't expect much from China and Chinese. I do expect better from Japan and Japanese, however. 


  • 0

#22 JasonJ

JasonJ

    nonbiri

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,155 posts

Posted 30 August 2018 - 2123 PM

Muzzle Asahi how?
  • 0

#23 Nobu

Nobu

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,132 posts

Posted 30 August 2018 - 2331 PM

Reported on for a number of years now, unfortunately, by the New York Times, FP, the Office of the UN Special Rapporteur on the Protection of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression, and the Columbia Journalism Review.

 

        

  • 0

#24 JasonJ

JasonJ

    nonbiri

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,155 posts

Posted 30 August 2018 - 2344 PM

Come on... links or something.
  • 0

#25 Nobu

Nobu

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,132 posts

Posted 31 August 2018 - 0038 AM

Come on... links or something.

 

The New York Times:

Effort by Japan to Stifle News Media Is Working

https://www.nytimes....is-working.html

The New York Times / By Martin Fackler / April 26, 2015

 

FP:

The Silencing of Japan’s Free Press

https://foreignpolic...inzo-abe-media/

Foreign Policy / By Martin Fackler / May 27, 2016

 

The Office of the UN Special Rapporteur on the Protection of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression:

Report of the Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression on his mission to Japan

http://hrn.or.jp/wpH...2_Add.1_AUV.pdf

UN Human Rights Council Thirty-fifth session / Advance unedited edition / 29 May 2017

 

British coverage of the report of the UN Special Rapporteur:

Japan accused of eroding press freedom by UN special rapporteur

https://www.theguard...cial-rapporteur

The Guardian / By Justin McCurry / Tue 13 Jun 2017

 

The Columbia Journalism Review:

Sinking a bold foray into watchdog journalism in Japan

https://www.cjr.org/..._journalism.php

CJR / By Martin Fackler / October 25, 2016

Will the Japanese media stand up for press freedom?

https://www.cjr.org/...-shinzo-abe.php

CJR / By Joel Simon / June 9 2017


  • 0

#26 JasonJ

JasonJ

    nonbiri

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,155 posts

Posted 31 August 2018 - 0530 AM

Fair enough post but give me some time, lots of stuff to say about the media in Japan in order to address that, it'll take a big post..


  • 0

#27 JasonJ

JasonJ

    nonbiri

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,155 posts

Posted 01 September 2018 - 0158 AM

There are many problems with the general tone implied by the choice of words of the headline. Some of those articles are quite long and eventually get to the troublesome parts on the part of media, or more specifically, Asahi which is the media outlet singled out more than any other. A major mistake that is advanced is that these reports are reducing the situation to Abe vs the media when it is really mostly Abe vs Asahi. So then is it really Abe trying to muzzle Asahi for being to critical? Or might it be something else that many other media outlets won't dare say.. that Asahi has gone too far with reporting false information?

 

The NYT article has a lot of text about Mr. Kogo being put under pressure and how he suddenly left, announcing it on TV, because of such pressure. Here is a video of when he announced his leaving at 0:13 https://www.youtube....h?v=xi45oZSzjv4. Kogo is on the right. The man on the left is Furutachi, also Asahi and got pressured to leave as mentioned in a linked article in the FP article. Back to the NYT article, what is absent throughout the article is the reporting that he has done and the context it was made in, except for an example provided about Abe's handling of Japanese held hostages in Syria, but still doesn't go into what Kogo actually said. There was a TN thread made about the two Japanese hostages, one being Kenji Goto, but the search engine fails me, I can't elaborate it effectively right now so as not able to judge whether or not Mr. Kogo was being excessively critical, although he did a holding of a sign gimmick which read "I'm not Abe" which I would say it way too simple for swinging people to think against the Abe administration. Leave the opinion making matters to actual content, not catch phrase attempts. But a more critical area not touched on in the NYT article was time when the Japanese government was working to pass new defense laws based on the concept of "Collective Self-Defense" first enabled by the reinterpretation of the constitution in 2014. Here is a 2014 piece by Mr. Kogo about how Abe planned on making Japan a war country and no where in it does it consider China or North Korea, thus a totally biased piece against the Abe government on an extraordinarily important geopolitical matter. So in other words, Mr. Kogo is very left wing that had a very big microphone.

 

The FP article emphasizes independent media under attack. But is Asahi really independent is the question that needs to be addressed. Structurally independent from the government yes, But that could imply that other Japanese media stations are structurally part of the government which is nonsense. If independent is supposed to mean a fair an unbiased media that criticizes the government within that realm, then Asahi is not independent because it often does not provide the general full context. At least the FP article notes that there has been nothing like the kidnapping of Journalists. But overall, like the NYT article, it runs short on actual examples that would make it possible to judge whether or not Asahi has gone too far. It mentions Fukushima coverage by Asahi a little, I can't comment on that because I haven't paid so much attention to it. I assume the Abe government was hush about something on it and can conceive a point, but to be will informed on it might require to go into neclear techie stuff in the Japanese language. For the past years, I considered tackling it, but never found the time for it. But FP mentions another one of Asahi, the comfort women, and FP is very brief on it. The comfort women issue is a huge issue because at the time the ROK Park president was making satisfaction of the comfort issue a requirement for Japan-ROK relations, so the comfort women issue was literally propelled to the top level of diplomatic relations with Japan's geographically closest neighbor, ROK, whose relations will have a big impact on economics, North Korea, China, trilateral military relations with the US. But the FP article addressed the comfort women portion with 

 


...What it lacked in investigative prowess, the liberal Asahi had tried to make up for in editorial spunk, opposing the revisionist right’s efforts to whitewash sordid aspects of Japan’s World War II-era history like the “comfort women” forced to work in military brothels.

But in August 2014, the Asahi pulled back from both its comfort women coverage and its investigations into Fukushima following harsh right-wing attacks, led by Abe himself, on missteps in some of its articles. On Oct. 3, 2014, Abe attacked the Asahi for damaging Japan’s reputation after the newspaper belatedly admitted that more than a dozen stories published a quarter-century ago about comfort women had been based on the sourcing of a discredited Japanese army veteran. “It is a fact that its misreporting has caused numerous people to feel hurt, sorrow, suffering, and outrage,” Abe told the lower house budget committee. “It has caused great damage to Japan’s image.”

...

 

The FP article with that portion above makes it sound like the right wingers beat Asahi senseless in order to admit it doing something wrong for still a good cause. Asahi was literally feeding incorrect information about Japan and was putting the Abe government in a very difficult position with an unreasonably unforgiving ROK government and people.

 

Times have changed.. Japan is no longer living in a safe neighborhood where its reporters can freely criticize the government to an extent in which the Prime minster is changing every year as a result (2006-2012). Media has responsibility to oblige by too. While governments, even democratic ones, are still the force that exercises authority over the people, thus it is good if the people can rip into the government, even if going trollish, as that indicated the lax control of the instrument of terror (i.e. government). But it is also only the government that can assemble and use properly armed forces and other security matters for the country. Japan's neighborhood has become too dangerous for the government to always by beaten down by the people lacking the basic concepts of national security and failing to realize the new security environment. So Asahi needed to be taken down a notch IMO. I think calling it "muzzling Asahi" is not fair because it implies that Asahi has done nothing wrong in its reporting. Asahi still remains fully active.

 

Asahi (and outside western media, ROK media too for that matter) never portrayed the full case with the comfort women. After Asahi got hit hard and finally retracted the articles that projected the said fabricated comfort women stories as facts, broadcast media did put out some debates between "Japan apologized enough" and "Japan hasn't apologized enough". Here are two debates. The first one is with a right winger (who is also an American having made lots of Japanese books). It comes after the so-called December 2015 landmark agreement between Japan and ROK to finally an irreversible resolve the comfort women issue (which of course has not happened). Well anyway, that debate here: https://www.youtube....h?v=GSoIydPASqM  Since it is all Japanese, to gauge the American, an English video of him talking about the general same topic (for those that want to waste time though yeah), although that debate goes much longer and shows how comfort women issue is dragging on other important shared issues such as security in partnership with the US. Another debate, same woman that argued for "Japan hasn't apologized enough" and a Japanese historian here: https://www.youtube....h?v=74wbauxydTc

Again the debate is all Japanese, so some English of the historian here: https://www.youtube....h?v=Z1XtbyXGXQ0 Here is a wiki (only Japanese or Korean) on the woman for those that have time to kill trying to google translate it: https://ja.wikipedia.../wiki/金慶珠

 

 

The October 2016 CJR also mentions the Fukushima and Comfort Women parts by Asahi. For the comfort women part it goes as

 


...That uproar began on Aug. 5, 2014  when the Asahi suddenly announced in a front-page article that it was retracting more than a dozen stories published in the 1980s and early 1990s about “comfort women” forced to work in wartime Japanese military brothels. The newspaper was belatedly admitting what historians knew: that a Japanese war veteran quoted in the articles, Seiji Yoshida, had fabricated his claims of having forcibly rounded up more than 1,000 Korean women.

The comfort women retractions appeared to be an attempt by the Asahi to preempt critics in the administration by coming clean about a decades-old problem. Instead, the move backfired, giving the revisionist right ammunition to attack the Asahi. The public pillorying, led by Abe himself, who said the reporting “has caused great damage to Japan’s image,” grew so intense that the magazine of the Foreign Correspondents Club of Japan ran a cover story: “Sink the Asahi!”

...

 

Ultimately, I think these articles are trying to defend the Asahi in order to defend the basic pillars of journalism that is free from government control. In these examples, they are playing down the impact of the comfort women part, and around that part is the many paragraphs of pressure against the media/Asahi, so it feels too biased for Asahi. And again, what is totally absent is the entire context of the situation. They are defending Asahi as if "I'm not Abe" is high quality journalism. And the other Japanese media such as Sankei or Yomiura, are labeled as "right wing" with the negative history-denier-on-a-war path tone. Does that mean that those left wing media stations like Asahi should be shut down. Of course not, and they haven't. But pragmatically speaking, the cost of keeping Asahi reporting as it was doing was growing great with dire consequences, should the new defense laws fail to pass because of a population eating too much Asahi cornflakes for breakfast. Where would the security of the Asia-Pacific be if Japan had not successfully passed the new defense laws?

 

Finally is that UN report by David Kaye. He also went to a press conference in Japan on the last day of his visit for making that work. Pretty much the same complaints as I have stated concerning the above news articles, not enough consideration to the context of the situation and not enough attention to the actual false facts being presented as truth in media, particularly by Asahi. He does still give a considerable amount of positive credit to Japan's overall degree of freedom of the press and speech in the realms of broadcast media, print media, and online, positive credit that is obviously not reflected in those news articles even though some of them quote the UN report. So he gives the cridet while voicing concerns. Ultimately, there is nothing wrong with expressing concerns in a trend. The practice of putting pressure on some journalists is a concern. Could the practice continue on further? Could there be a next step? Yes it is a concern. Something a little contradictory in part of his report was stating how the Japanese Broadcast Act ensures the press freedom from regulation thus concluding that the government is coming up close to violating it. But at the same time, article 4 has the following points:

 


(i) it must not negatively influence public safety or good morals;

(ii) it must be politically fair;

(iii) reporting must not distort the facts; and

(iv) it must clarify the points at issue from as many angles as possible where there are conflicting opinions concerning an issue.

 

At the press conference, Kaye even mentions article 4 but doesn't really take it up to the point that it should be taken up to. Has Asahi not violated article 4? I think it has. Although his UN report concludes on page 7 that it is not up to the government but up to self-regulation to determine that. Even so, the right to self-regulation is increasing geopolitcal costs. But that is probably outside the purposes of the UN report. But still I would weigh media's failure to follow article 4 for the past 25 years (as far as comfort is concerned) as enough is enough IMO.

 

On page 15 of the report, it goes into hate speech and discrimination, particularly towards ethnic Koreans in the year 2014-2016 years. I think it would have been helpful to go into the cause, again was the unsolvable stance on the comfort women issue. The general sentiment of Japan towards ROK has been a rocky rode, with positive increases due to the Korean wave of culture, fashion, a and music, to the downfall because of the comfort women. I went at length about this in Part 1 (4) in this post. But the UN report continues and notes the efforts made to bring down the hate speech such as the passing of the Hate Speech Act in May 2016.


Edited by JasonJ, 01 September 2018 - 0311 AM.

  • 0

#28 Nobu

Nobu

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,132 posts

Posted 01 September 2018 - 0351 AM

So Asahi needed to be taken down a notch IMO. I think calling it "muzzling Asahi" is not fair because it implies that Asahi has done nothing wrong in its reporting. Asahi still remains fully active.

 

We are going to have to disagree on this one. I stand by my statement that "Abe has been trying to muzzle Asahi in various ways" and believe it to be quite fair.

 

Attempting to muzzle something, whether successfully or not, does not usually result in the killing of it. I would classify Abe's attempts to muzzle Asahi as partially successful. 


  • 0

#29 DB

DB

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,344 posts

Posted 11 September 2018 - 1108 AM

Brr.

https://www.bbc.co.u...-china-45426882

Bear in mind that Facebook uses a scoring system to monitor the social behaviour of "some" users.

At least it doesn't make anyone actually disappear.
  • 0

#30 Ssnake

Ssnake

    Virtual Shiva Beast

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 6,795 posts

Posted 11 September 2018 - 1911 PM

...for now.


  • 0

#31 JasonJ

JasonJ

    nonbiri

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,155 posts

Posted 29 October 2018 - 0853 AM

BBC report about the growth of Uyghur detention centers. Also worth considering the comment section.

 


Edited by JasonJ, 29 October 2018 - 0853 AM.

  • 0

#32 Mr King

Mr King

    Fat Body

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19,418 posts

Posted 17 November 2018 - 2006 PM

Worst China (Taiwan) funeral strippers

 

 

NSFW

 

These gals look like a lot of fun


  • 0

#33 JasonJ

JasonJ

    nonbiri

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,155 posts

Posted 17 November 2018 - 2312 PM

Taiwan isn't a China.

 

KMT take over of the island was a result of being on the ally side. CKS was not welcomed and his Chinese faction was not welcomed. Thus CKS committed massacre and followed with a witch hunt in order to implant his China into the island with the goal of taken back the rest of the mainland. Thus it is not a case of Formosa being liberated but rather Formosa being given to a previous foreign power. Thus taking away a chance for the island to become self rule. The KMT's defeat in the China Civil War resulted in KMT's territory being reduced to nothing except principally Formosa thus presenting a false image of self-island rule.

 

It is today's geopolitics (One China Policy) and economics that keep the KMT legacy as official status alive. Only 10% of the population consider themselves as "Chinese". Another 10 or so percent consider themselves as "Chinese and Taiwanese". the Rest of the 75 to 80 percent of the population consider themselves as "Taiwanese". It goes strongly in contrast with Korea in which Koreans in both Koreas on the peninsula identify themselves as Korean by 100%.

 

Taiwan has a long history of being controlled by foreigners. And the first foreign power to do so was not even China, but were the Dutch and Spanish. The Chinese first came in to Formosa as a result of a war between Manchus (later the Qing) and the Ming Dynasty in China. One faction was losing (the Ming) and they retreated off the mainland and to Formosa, kicking out the Spanish and Dutch in the process. The winning faction (Qing) followed behind and some years later, invaded Formosa to exterminate the Ming and kept a presence on Formosa afterwards, full of rebellion and crackdowns ensured. Later the Qing loses to Imperial Japan thus Formosa passes from Qing to Imperial Japan. Imperial Japan lost in WW2 and unconditional terms resulted in the territorial loss of Formosa. CKS was an ally so he got Formosa.


Edited by JasonJ, 17 November 2018 - 2315 PM.

  • 0

#34 toysoldier

toysoldier

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,129 posts

Posted 17 November 2018 - 2327 PM

You just bummed a post about strippers :(
  • 0

#35 JasonJ

JasonJ

    nonbiri

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,155 posts

Posted 17 November 2018 - 2333 PM

Can be considered as going off topic within reason, if it helps  ;) 

NSFW https://www.youtube....h?v=ebcWvD9sv78


  • 0

#36 Nobu

Nobu

    Crew

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,132 posts

Posted 18 November 2018 - 0009 AM

Taiwanese/Nationalist Chinese/Whateverese passports are stamped "Republic of China" on their covers in both English and Chinese, presumably to ensure no doubt exists as to the nationality of their bearers.


  • 0

#37 JasonJ

JasonJ

    nonbiri

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,155 posts

Posted 18 November 2018 - 0115 AM

Some have used stickers to replace those words.

taiwanpassport1.jpg

 

taiwanpassport2.jpg

https://www.hongkong...y-to-hong-kong/


  • 0

#38 Mr King

Mr King

    Fat Body

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 19,418 posts

Posted 18 November 2018 - 0207 AM

Taiwan isn't a China.

 

 

Relax, it's a meme. 


  • 0

#39 JasonJ

JasonJ

    nonbiri

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 11,155 posts

Posted 18 November 2018 - 0223 AM

Incidentally, recently there was a baseball game between Japan and Taiwan in which Taiwan was listed as just that "Taiwan" in the scoreboard. There's hope in Taiwan that in the coming 2020 Olympics to be hosted in Japan that they will not be listed as "Chinese Taipei" Seeing their team being listed as "Taiwan" rather than some political appeasing title for PRC on the TV screen got their attention.

 

At the bottom:

台湾 Taiwan

日本 Japan

TaiwanJapan.jpg

https://www.taiwanne...en/news/3570783


  • 0

#40 Panzermann

Panzermann

    REFORGER '79

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,586 posts

Posted 18 November 2018 - 0831 AM

https://foreignpolic...core-isnt-real/


the social karma system looks like a powerpoint success story. It always works in the presentation. :D
  • 0