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Cold War, The Reimagined Series


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#6801 Roman Alymov

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 1327 PM

 

 

So they take legacy systems, kitbash them into something new, build paltry amounts, and the US responds by developing new defensive equipment, whcih it can afford. That point it all looks a bit pointless to me. Its not even making significant work for the Russian defence industry, because as pointed out, much of it is legacy stuff from the USSR.

Actually Russian defense industry is now overloaded with work. It is relatively cheap now to build new plant, getting machine tools is bigger problems (as Soviet machine tools production is almost completely wiped out by "reformists") but it is possible to buy them abroad; but qualified workforce is main problem. Old generation is mostly gone, and after two decades of every young man or woman trying to become manager or criminal, finding qualified welder or machine tool operator is hard task. Training good welder may take years....
    Now Rus state is taking massive efforts to address the problem, but still it will take years to recover


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#6802 Roman Alymov

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Posted 19 January 2019 - 1341 PM


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#6803 Rick

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 0603 AM

 

 

 

So they take legacy systems, kitbash them into something new, build paltry amounts, and the US responds by developing new defensive equipment, whcih it can afford. That point it all looks a bit pointless to me. Its not even making significant work for the Russian defence industry, because as pointed out, much of it is legacy stuff from the USSR.

Actually Russian defense industry is now overloaded with work. It is relatively cheap now to build new plant, getting machine tools is bigger problems (as Soviet machine tools production is almost completely wiped out by "reformists") but it is possible to buy them abroad; but qualified workforce is main problem. Old generation is mostly gone, and after two decades of every young man or woman trying to become manager or criminal, finding qualified welder or machine tool operator is hard task. Training good welder may take years....
    Now Rus state is taking massive efforts to address the problem, but still it will take years to recover

 

Roman, as a reminder, I don't follow foreign policies, but is the Russian defense industry "overloaded" via foreign military orders?

Your commet "...every young man or woman trying to become (a) manager or criminal..." is interesting. Can you elaborate?


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#6804 Roman Alymov

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 0942 AM

Roman, as a reminder, I don't follow foreign policies, but is the Russian defense industry "overloaded" via foreign military orders?

 

Foreign deals are part of the load, but it is not correct to say foreign military orders are the main part of workload. Actual amount may vary significantly from one company to another...  For example, Rostov -on-Don helicopter plant is in 3-shifts-mode from 2013 - while Russian helicopter export is limited.
   Foreign military orders effectively saved Russian defense industry in 1990th-early 2000th, when Russian state was not able to provide adequate funding. But now their importance is limited.

 

 

Your commet "...every young man or woman trying to become (a) manager or criminal..." is interesting. Can you elaborate?

 

 

I think this old article would be best answer here

http://old.themoscow...tmt/298561.html

Russian Youth Prefer Crime To Space


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#6805 Dark_Falcon

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 1144 AM

This is a piece I should have posted earlier this month but as advanced weapons development is being discussed it fits now:

 

 

Navy Quietly Fires 20 Hyper Velocity Projectiles Through Destroyer’s Deckgun

4669213.jpg

Guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey (DDG-105) transits the Pacific Ocean while underway in the U.S. 3rd Fleet area of operations. US Navy Photo

 

Last summer USS Dewey (DDG-105) fired 20 hyper velocity projectiles (HVP) from a standard Mk 45 5-inch deck gun in a quiet experiment that’s set to add new utility to the weapon found on almost every U.S. warship, officials familiar with the test have told USNI News.

 

The test, conducted by the Navy and the Pentagon’s Strategic Capabilities Office as part of the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2018 international exercise, was part of a series of studies to prove the Navy could turn the more than 40-year-old deck gun design into an effective and low-cost weapon against cruise missiles and larger unmanned aerial vehicles.

 

While the HVP was originally designed to be the projectile for the electromagnetic railgun, the Navy and the Pentagon see the potential for a new missile defense weapon that can launch a guided round at near-hypersonic speeds.

 

Currently, the fleet uses a combination of missiles – like the Evolved Seasparrow Missile, the Rolling Airframe Missile and the Standard Missile 2 – to ward off cruise missile threats. The missiles are effective but also expensive, Bryan Clark with the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments told USNI News on Monday.

 

In 2016, guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG-87) fired three missiles to ward off two suspected Iranian cruise missiles fired from Houthi rebels in the Red Sea, in what amounted to a multi-million dollar engagement.

 

1434555289965.jpg

An artist’s conception of BAE Systems’ Hyper Velocity Projectile. BAE Systems Image

 

“So if you think about the kinds of threats you might face in the Middle East, the lower-end cruise missiles or a larger UAV, now you have a way to shoot them down that doesn’t require you use a $2 million ESSM or $1 million RAM because a hyper velocity projectile – even in the highest-end estimates have it in the $75,000 to $100,000 range, and that’s for the fanciest version of it with an onboard seeker,” he said.

 

An added benefit of using HVP in powder guns is the gun’s high rate of fire and a large magazine capacity.

 

“You can get 15 rounds a minute for an air defense mission as well as a surface-to-surface mission,” Clark said. “That adds significant missile defense capacity when you think that each of those might be replacing a ESSM or a RAM missile. They’re a lot less expensive.”

 

Screen-Shot-2015-06-01-at-10.43.11-AM.pn

A range of hyper velocity projectiles from different weapon systems. BAE Systems Image

 

 

Just the 5-inch version of the HVP could be a major upgrade for ships equipped with this gun and its cheap enough to defeat British Treasury objections, though I don't think it would receive such objections when it would let them buy fewer missiles instead.  Canada and any other NATOnation using such guns could also benefit, as could Australia and Japan.  And 155mm version could significant alter the artillery imbalance in NATO's favor.

 

(Note that the second image came from the BAE Systems page on the HVP, as the image on the USNI page was coming through distorted.)


Edited by Dark_Falcon, 20 January 2019 - 1150 AM.

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#6806 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 20 January 2019 - 1150 AM

I believe they were actually looking at the same gun from the AS90 as a potential future upgrade for the Class 45 destroyer.  I dont know if that is still on the cards though.


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#6807 Rick

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 0548 AM

 

Roman, as a reminder, I don't follow foreign policies, but is the Russian defense industry "overloaded" via foreign military orders?

 

Foreign deals are part of the load, but it is not correct to say foreign military orders are the main part of workload. Actual amount may vary significantly from one company to another...  For example, Rostov -on-Don helicopter plant is in 3-shifts-mode from 2013 - while Russian helicopter export is limited.
   Foreign military orders effectively saved Russian defense industry in 1990th-early 2000th, when Russian state was not able to provide adequate funding. But now their importance is limited.

 

 

Your commet "...every young man or woman trying to become (a) manager or criminal..." is interesting. Can you elaborate?

 

 

I think this old article would be best answer here

http://old.themoscow...tmt/298561.html

Russian Youth Prefer Crime To Space

 

Any changes noted in Russian youth now compared to then? Is there a push among young Russian males to be welders, plumbers, carpenters, etc.? What in the U.S. would be called skilled, blue-collar jobs.


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#6808 Roman Alymov

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 0637 AM

 


 

Any changes noted in Russian youth now compared to then? Is there a push among young Russian males to be welders, plumbers, carpenters, etc.? What in the U.S. would be called skilled, blue-collar jobs.

 

To some degree - yes, at least blue-collar jobs are no more stigmatized as "for losers only" as it was on last years of USSR and early years of "independence". Now about 25% of all blue-collar jobs are occupied by people from 26 to 35 years old, average age of blue-collar worker (42,5) is almost the same as general average age of working person  (41,9). Of course it does not mean we are completely ok and all problems solved. Probably it will take decades...
https://www.bfm.ru/news/393034


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#6809 Roman Alymov

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 1208 PM

Not exactly military news, but since Arctic repeatedly mentioned here...


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#6810 Roman Alymov

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Posted 21 January 2019 - 1210 PM


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#6811 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 1133 AM

https://ukdefencejou...-red-flag-2019/

 

Personnel and aircraft from the Royal Air Force have started to leave the UK for Exercise Red Flag in the US, say the Ministry of Defence.

With a scenario designed to replicate the issues NATO faces today in the European Theatre, and which will become increasingly complex and challenging over its three-week duration, the exercise provides an unrivalled level of training say the Ministry of Defence in a release.

“Typhoons from RAF Lossiemouth, Sentry and Rivet Joint from RAF Waddington, and personnel from units stationed across the country will train at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada alongside counterparts from across the US Armed Forces and the Royal Australian Air Force.

The RAF’s Intelligence, Surveillance, Targeting and Reconnaissance Force (ISTAR) is deploying a Sentinel R1 from V(AC), an RC-135 Rivet Joint from 51 Squadron and Sentry AEW 1 (E-3D) from 8 Squadron. Each provides a complementary capability and for the first time on exercise will operate with No. 1 Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance Wing.”

Wing Commander Phil McConnell, Officer Commanding 51 Squadron, said:

“The unique capability which 51 Squadron offers has seen us very busy of late on operations. Red Flag affords us the ability not only to participate in the best air combat exercise in the world but also to do so with other complimentary RAF ISTAR platforms in an exercise scenario representative of the issues NATO and Europe face today. It’s a great opportunity which we are very much looking forward to.”

The Red Flag exercise commences on the 28th of January.


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#6812 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 1135 AM

https://ukdefencejou...start-training/

Personnel from 120 Squadron and the Poseidon Line Squadron have started training at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida, say the Ministry of Defence. 

There are just over eight months until the delivery of the first British Poseidon MRA Mk1 Maritime Patrol Aircraft.

According to the MoD, the initial cadre of 38 personnel drawn from RAF Lossiemouth, are a mix of aircrew and engineers and will be trained on the US Navy training squadron, Patrol Squadron 30 (VP-30).

“RAF personnel will be trained in the USA during the next three years before the RAF transitions to train all their P-8A Poseidon personnel in the UK at RAF Lossiemouth.  Each training course is tailored to the role and trade of the trainee and takes approximately 6-months to complete.


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#6813 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 1233 PM

https://ukdefencejou...male-civilians/

 

As of late December 2018, the British Army now welcomes applications from female civilians to apply to join the Infantry.

The move follows the announcement that exclusions on women serving in close combat roles were being lifted.

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson announced the date at the Land Combat Power Visit on Salisbury Plain in October, when he opened infantry roles to women who are already serving in other Army units. New recruits could potentially start basic training in April 2019.

According to an MoD news release:

“It is hoped that opening all roles to women will increase the quality and quantity of soldiers. Indeed, it is only right and fair that people who can meet the standards are given the opportunity to do so.

Combat effectiveness will be maintained through the maintenance of physical employment standards, which are designed to match an individual’s physical ability to their employment. Standards will not be lowered.

A front-footed approach, ensuring the right people are employed in the right role, will promote and reinforce Defence’s intent to create a modern, diverse and more effective organisation whilst implementing change responsibly.”

The gradual roll-out of close combat roles becoming available to women began with the Royal Armoured Corps in late 2016.

Since 1914, in western militaries, women have served in greater numbers and more diverse roles than before. In the 1970s, most Western armies began allowing women to serve in active duty in all military branches.

In nine countries women are conscripted into military service. Only a few countries allow women to serve on an equal basis. At the start of last year they included Australia, Canada, Germany, Norway, Sweden and Denmark.


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#6814 Roman Alymov

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 1407 PM

Rus MOD press conference about 9М729 missile (with Eng translation)


Edited by Roman Alymov, 23 January 2019 - 1410 PM.

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#6815 glenn239

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Posted 23 January 2019 - 1532 PM

https://www.wsj.com/...ary-11548255438

 

Has a map showing some (apparently not all) S-400 battery deployments.  

 

Kaliningrad - 1

Syria - 1

Black Sea - 5

Moscow Region - 5

Northern Fleet - 1

Central Russia - 4

Far East - 3


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#6816 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 1230 PM

https://theaviationi...o-crew-members/

 

A Russian Air Force Tu-22M3 supersonic bomber crashed at Olenegorsk airbase, in the Murmansk region, shortly after 13:30LT on Jan. 22. According to the first reports, the aircraft was attempting to recover at its homebase in bad weather after a training sortie when it performed a hard landing. Of the four crew members, two were injured and were transported to a medical facility to receive assistance whereas two were killed.

The Russian MoD said in a public release that the Tu-22 mission was carried out without weapons.


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#6817 Roman Alymov

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 1527 PM

https://theaviationi...o-crew-members/

 

A Russian Air Force Tu-22M3 supersonic bomber crashed at Olenegorsk airbase, in the Murmansk region, shortly after 13:30LT on Jan. 22. According to the first reports, the aircraft was attempting to recover at its homebase in bad weather after a training sortie when it performed a hard landing. Of the four crew members, two were injured and were transported to a medical facility to receive assistance whereas two were killed.

The Russian MoD said in a public release that the Tu-22 mission was carried out without weapons.

One of pilots later died in hospital.

    Meanwhile another form of cold war


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#6818 carrierlost

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 1805 PM

https://theaviationi...o-crew-members/

 

A Russian Air Force Tu-22M3 supersonic bomber crashed at Olenegorsk airbase, in the Murmansk region, shortly after 13:30LT on Jan. 22. According to the first reports, the aircraft was attempting to recover at its homebase in bad weather after a training sortie when it performed a hard landing. Of the four crew members, two were injured and were transported to a medical facility to receive assistance whereas two were killed.

The Russian MoD said in a public release that the Tu-22 mission was carried out without weapons.

According to this document it was armed and  had  Kh-22N  onboard and 750 rounds of ammo for the gun. Kh-22N is a nuclear warhead version afaik. Apparently the aircraft broke in two upon landing and caught fire. The section with the crew was quite a distance from the main plane. Lets see if we get confirmations of this.


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#6819 JWB

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Posted 24 January 2019 - 2106 PM

 

https://theaviationi...o-crew-members/

 

A Russian Air Force Tu-22M3 supersonic bomber crashed at Olenegorsk airbase, in the Murmansk region, shortly after 13:30LT on Jan. 22. According to the first reports, the aircraft was attempting to recover at its homebase in bad weather after a training sortie when it performed a hard landing. Of the four crew members, two were injured and were transported to a medical facility to receive assistance whereas two were killed.

The Russian MoD said in a public release that the Tu-22 mission was carried out without weapons.

One of pilots later died in hospital.

    Meanwhile another form of cold war

 

 

 

https://theaviationi...o-crew-members/

 

A Russian Air Force Tu-22M3 supersonic bomber crashed at Olenegorsk airbase, in the Murmansk region, shortly after 13:30LT on Jan. 22. According to the first reports, the aircraft was attempting to recover at its homebase in bad weather after a training sortie when it performed a hard landing. Of the four crew members, two were injured and were transported to a medical facility to receive assistance whereas two were killed.

The Russian MoD said in a public release that the Tu-22 mission was carried out without weapons.

One of pilots later died in hospital.

    Meanwhile another form of cold war

 

 

 

https://theaviationi...o-crew-members/

 

A Russian Air Force Tu-22M3 supersonic bomber crashed at Olenegorsk airbase, in the Murmansk region, shortly after 13:30LT on Jan. 22. According to the first reports, the aircraft was attempting to recover at its homebase in bad weather after a training sortie when it performed a hard landing. Of the four crew members, two were injured and were transported to a medical facility to receive assistance whereas two were killed.

The Russian MoD said in a public release that the Tu-22 mission was carried out without weapons.

One of pilots later died in hospital.

    Meanwhile another form of cold war

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xu-w6m0_lAw

 

Rhetoric.


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#6820 Roman Alymov

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Posted 25 January 2019 - 0138 AM

According to this document it was armed and  had  Kh-22N  onboard and 750 rounds of ammo for the gun. Kh-22N is a nuclear warhead version afaik. Apparently the aircraft broke in two upon landing and caught fire. The section with the crew was quite a distance from the main plane. Lets see if we get confirmations of this.

 

6466495_original.jpg

6466601_original.jpg


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