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Warsaw Pact Question


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#1 Dawes

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Posted 02 June 2018 - 1612 PM

I seem to recall reading somewhere that, during the Cold War, Poland was the only Warsaw Pact military to employ chaplains. Anybody know if this was indeed the case?


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#2 rmgill

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Posted 03 June 2018 - 0137 AM

Weren't commissars effectively a form of religious officer? 


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#3 RETAC21

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Posted 03 June 2018 - 0207 AM

I seem to recall reading somewhere that, during the Cold War, Poland was the only Warsaw Pact military to employ chaplains. Anybody know if this was indeed the case?

 

Yes, that's right..


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#4 DougRichards

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Posted 03 June 2018 - 0528 AM

I would not be surprised if that was the case, however I have a feeling that some other countries may not have had chaplains, but that some ordinary soldiers of faith may have fulfilled that role quietly and in a way that would not have brought difficulties down on them.


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#5 RETAC21

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Posted 03 June 2018 - 0652 AM

Probably less a question of faith than of national identity, when I was in Poland, and coming from catholic country myself, I was impressed that the Poles thought themselves catholic because they were Poles.


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#6 R011

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Posted 03 June 2018 - 1118 AM

Probably less a question of faith than of national identity, when I was in Poland, and coming from catholic country myself, I was impressed that the Poles thought themselves catholic because they were Poles.

With Prussian Lutherans on one side and Orthodox Russians on the other, I can see why they'd identify that way.
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#7 Captain Hurricane

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Posted 03 June 2018 - 2210 PM

 

Yes appears they did exist - from Polish Wikipedia page on the Polish Army (thanks to online translator :) ): https://pl.wikipedia...ojska_Polskiego

 

General Dean's Office of the Polish Army - organizational structure of the Polish People's Army, whose task was to provide Catholic pastoral ministry to officers and soldiers and their families. It existed in the years 1945-1989. Its successor became the Ordynariat Polowy Polish Army. 

 

After the end of World War II pastoral care in the Polish Army was performed by the chaplains of the First and Second Armies of the Polish Army, whose superior until the early 1945 was Fr. Lt.-Col. Wilhelm Kubsz. On February 2, 1945, the Minister of National Defense appointed Fr. Colonel. Stanisław Warchałowski, who held this post until he was appointed to this position in 1947 by Colonel. Wacław Pyszkowski. During the service of priest On March 19, 1948, the Polish Episcopate issued a communiqué on the military pastoral ministry, in which he stated that in connection with the vacant position of the field Ordinary, military chaplains do not have ecclesiastical jurisdiction and must obtain it from the local ordinaries. Following this, the Secretariat of State of the Holy See revoked the statute of the existing on the basis of the 1925 military ordinate of April 21, 1948. On September 30, 1948, Episcopate presented the Ministry of Public Administration with the 'draft Statute of Military Ministry', which provided for the appointment of the Chief Chaplain of the Polish Army, appointed by the Holy See in agreement with the state authorities, no progress until the April 14, 1950 Agreement between the Government of the Republic of Poland. and the Polish Episcopate, which provided for the regulation of the position of the military pastoral service in the statute established in the dialogue between the military authorities and the Episcopate, it was not until the Act of 13 December 1957 on military service of the officers of the Armed Forces that there was a corps in the Armed Forces In accordance with the adopted solutions, military chaplains were appointed and dismissed by the Minister of National Defense or the General Dean. In 1989, the General Deanery had 35 positions of chaplains, including 4 at the General Office Deanery and 31 at garrison churches.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Cheers

CH


Edited by Captain Hurricane, 03 June 2018 - 2212 PM.

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