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Protests In Hong Kong


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#121 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 0930 AM

 

Thank you Sunday. Its been an eventful month to put it mildly.

 

As said before, no parts of Hong Kong were abandoned. It would have been impossible to hold onto half a city when the Communists owned ALL the reservoirs. To keep Hong Kong, we would have had to keep regularly importing icebergs. Besides, splitting cities never works very well. Ask a Berliner.

 

As for Gibraltar, its pretty clear the Blair Government were willing to throw Gibraltar under the bus to get support from Spain on various issues in the EU. That only ended when the leadership of Spain changed. All looks a bit short sighted now, but that was our Tony for you.

 

Seems you are stating that yes, that half of a city was abandoned because of lack of infrastructures.

You know, there is a thing called Civil Engineering that comprises reservoir building, and there other things called desalination plants, and there was time to prepare a division. HK also, probably earnt HM Government a pretty shilling or two, and not all of them because the export of opium.

Probably, the average HKer would have received UK citizenship with more advantage than most UK residents originating from the Indian subcontinent, Mayor of London included.

 

 

Where you going to put them? Hong Kong is already built on, and the bits that arent are small mountains. None of these are great options for reservoirs. Also, Britain in 1984 was broke. Where was all this money for investing in a colony going to come from, when we could barely invest in the rest of Britain?

 

You only have to look at the wiki entry to see the reason why.

 

https://en.wikipedia...New_Territories

As the expiry date of the lease neared in the 1980s, talks between the United Kingdom and the People's Republic of China led to the signing of the Sino-British Joint Declaration (1984), in which the whole of Hong Kong would be returned, instead of only the New Territories. This is because Hong Kong's shipping ports, reservoirs and other vital installations were all in the New Territories. Had only the New Territories been returned to China, it would also have been difficult to accommodate those New Territories residents moving to the Kowloon Peninsula and Hong Kong Island.

 

 

So you end up with a colony without water or ports. It makes the Northern Ireland Brexit problem look straightforward.


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#122 sunday

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 1134 AM

Note that the talks did not include directly the people of HK. That is different from Gibraltar. Anyway, seems one part of the Sino-British Joint Declaration considers it is now void:

 

In July 2017, when British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson urged democratic progress in Hong Kong,[26][27] China's foreign ministry spokesman Lu Kang said the legally binding Hong Kong handover treaty with Britain 'as a historical document, no longer has any practical significance,' and that 'It is not at all binding for the central government's management over Hong Kong. The UK has no sovereignty, no power to rule and no power to supervise Hong Kong after the handover.'[28][29][30][31][32] In response the British Foreign office said: "It is a legally binding treaty, registered with the UN and continues to be in force. As a co-signatory, the UK government is committed to monitoring its implementation closely." Johnson restated Britain's commitment to Hong Kong is enshrined in the "treaty" that was "just as strong today" as it was 20 years ago.[29][32]

 
 
Also this:
 

Lu told reporters during a regular briefing on Friday that the document no longer binds China.

“Now Hong Kong has returned to the motherland’s embrace for 20 years, the Sino-British Joint Declaration, as a historical document, no longer has any practical significance, and it is not at all binding for the central government’s management over Hong Kong. The UK has no sovereignty, no power to rule and no power to supervise Hong Kong after the handover,” Lu said.


This looks the kind of bullying we use to see when describing the operations of certain Western powers in the middle of the 19th century...

Perhaps it is time to begin repatriation of HKers...


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#123 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 13 July 2019 - 1353 PM

Id be happy to have them. I like Chinese food.


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#124 BansheeOne

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Posted 21 July 2019 - 1138 AM

Hong Kong police launch tear gas in latest mass protest

 
By ALICE FUNG and YANAN WANG 21 minutes ago
 

HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong police launched tear gas at protesters Sunday after a massive pro-democracy march continued late into the evening. The action was the latest confrontation between police and demonstrators who have taken to the streets for over a month to protest a proposed extradition bill and call for electoral reforms in the Chinese territory.

 

The march reached its police-designated end point in Hong Kong’s Wan Chai district in the late afternoon, but thousands continued onward, at various points occupying key government and business districts. They then headed for the Liaison Office, which represents China’s Communist Party-led central government within the city.

Protesters threw eggs at the building and spray-painted its surrounding surveillance cameras. China’s national emblem, which adorns the front of the Liaison Office, was splattered with black ink.

 

Later, police threw tear gas canisters at protesters to try to disperse them. Protesters scattered, some heading back in the direction of a key business and retail district. Police remained in place, protecting themselves with shields.

 

Organizers said 430,000 people participated in the march, while police said there were 138,000 during the procession’s “peak period.”

 

[...]

 

Walking in sweltering heat, protesters dressed in black kicked off Sunday’s march at a public park, carrying a large banner that read “Independent Inquiry for Rule of Law.”

 

“Free Hong Kong! Democracy now!” the protesters chanted, forming a dense procession through Hong Kong’s Wan Chai district as they were joined by others who had been waiting in side streets.

 

“I think the government has never responded to our demands,” said Karen Yu, a 52-year-old Hong Kong resident who has attended four protests since they started. “No matter how much the government can do, at least it should come out and respond to us directly.”

 

Marchers ignored orders from police to finish off the procession on a road in Wan Chai, according to police and the Civil Human Rights Front, the march’s organizers.

 

Protesters repeated the five points of their “manifesto,” which was first introduced when a small group of them stormed the legislature earlier this month. Their main demands include universal suffrage — direct voting rights for all Hong Kong residents — as well as dropping charges against anti-extradition protesters, withdrawing the characterization of a clash between police and protesters as a “riot” and dissolving the Legislative Council.

 

Protesters read the demands aloud in both English and Cantonese in videos released Saturday.

 

“We did not want to embark on this path of resisting tyranny with our bare bodies,” they said, “but for too long, our government has lied and deceived, and refused to respond to the demands of the people.”

 

While the demonstrations have been largely peaceful, some confrontations between police and protesters have turned violent. In Sha Tin district the previous Sunday, they beat each other with umbrellas and bats inside a luxury shopping center. Demonstrators broke into the Legislative Council building on July 1 by moving past barricades and shattering windows. Meanwhile, police officers have used pepper spray, tear gas, bean bag rounds and rubber bullets to quell the crowds.

 

On Friday, Hong Kong police discovered a stash of a powerful homemade explosive and arrested a man in a raid on a commercial building. Materials voicing opposition to the extradition bill were found at the site, local media said, but a police spokesman said no concrete link had been established and the investigation was continuing.

 

The People’s Daily, the Communist Party’s official newspaper, condemned “radical extremists” who attacked the legislature and “trampled” on Hong Kong’s rule of law in a front-page column Sunday. The paper said a counter-rally Saturday intended to show support for the police reflected “mainstream public opinion” in Hong Kong.

 

https://www.apnews.c...1b84c4e754ee934


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#125 BansheeOne

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 0440 AM

Things got a lot more interesting overnight. Of course it's a little unfortunate if you have to call on police after clashing with them earlier when your guys assaulted various public institution, though it's their job to protect everyone regardless. Allegedly some of the attackers were seen leaving the scene in cars with mainland plates. I'm seeing a case for Chinese intervention being built.

JULY 22, 2019 / 3:35 AM / UPDATED AN HOUR AGO

Hong Kong police criticized over failure to stop attacks on protesters

James Pomfret, Donny Kwok

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hong Kong police faced criticism on Monday for an apparent failure to protect anti-government protesters and passersby from attack by suspected gang members at a train station on the weekend.

The attack on Sunday came during a night of violence that opened new fronts in Hong Kongs widening political crisis over an extradition bill, that could see people sent to China for trial.

Protesters had earlier on Sunday surrounded Chinas main representative office in the city and defaced walls and signs and clashed with police.

The citys Beijing-backed leader, Carrie Lam, condemned the attack on Chinas liaison office, saying it was a "challenge" to national sovereignty.

She condemned violent behavior of any kind and described as "shocking" the apparent attack by triad criminal gangs on ordinary citizens and protesters at the station, saying authorities would investigate fully.

Some politicians and activists have long linked Hong Kongs shadowy network of triad criminal gangs to political intimidation and violence in recent years, sometimes against pro-democracy activists and critics of Beijing.

On Sunday night, men in white T-shirts, some armed with various types of clubs, flooded into the rural Yuen Long station, and stormed a train, attacking passengers with pipes, poles and other objects, according to video footage.

Witnesses, including Democratic lawmaker Lam Cheuk-ting, said the men appeared to target black-shirted passengers who had been at an anti-government march.

The lawmaker Lam, who was wounded in the face and hospitalized, said the police ignored calls he made, pleading with to intervene and prevent bloodshed.

"They deliberately turned a blind eye to these attacks by triads on regular citizens", he told Reuters, saying the floors of the station were streaked with blood.

"I wont speculate on why they didnt help immediately", he said.

Forty-five people were injured in the violence at the station, with one in critical condition, according to hospital authorities.

A senior district police commander, Yau Nai-keung, said an initial police patrol had to wait reinforcements given a situation involving more than 100 people.

Yau told reporters the police had not made any arrests at the station or during a follow-up search of a nearby village, but were investigating.

Witnesses saw groups of men in white with poles and bamboo staves at the village but Yau said police saw no weapons when they arrived. Following some questioning of the men, they were allowed to leave, he told reporters.

"We cant say you have a problem because you are dressed in white and we have to arrest you. We will treat them fairly no matter which camp they are in", Yau said.

Police did not immediately respond to Reuters questions on the clash.

Hong Kongs anti-triad police units in 2014 investigated the role of triad gangs attacking protesters during the pro-democracy demonstrations that shut down parts of the city for 79 days that year.

[...]



https://www.reuters.com/article/us-hongkong-extradition/hong-kong-police-criticized-over-failure-to-stop-attacks-on-protesters-idUSKCN1UH02O

Edited by BansheeOne, 22 July 2019 - 0740 AM.

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#126 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 0506 AM

There was a case the other day where the Police arrested some protesters apparently armed with explosives, ive not seen any more on that anywhere? Probably turned out to be fireworks I guess.


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#127 JasonJ

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 0608 AM

There was a PLA general giving a speech in November last year saying that the problems in HK are due to education. That they need to be educated with the right textbooks, that this social situation is worse than in Taiwan. The source of the bad education are from people were educated by the British system and by the people that ran away from the CCP during the Chinese Civil War who hate the CCP.


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#128 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 0638 AM

Ah, dear old Communists, they always return to first principles. The system cant be bad, so it must be the people at fault. :)


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#129 Panzermann

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 1537 PM

Do note thaat the PLa is actually one of the largest publishers and printing houses in the world. The general just want s to sell more books. ;)

 

 

 

 

in other news masked people in white clothes attacked protestors:

 

 

https://www.hongkong...ists-residents/


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#130 Nobu

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 1600 PM

The Chinese version of the Proud Boys have apparently arrived.

 

And I thought the fistfights in Taiwanese/Republic of Chinese/Whateverese sessions of parliament were entertaining.


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#131 Adam_S

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 1622 PM

It looks like the PRC has turned to the brownshirts white T-shirt guys to sort things out. There were some mutterings on the news this morning about finding caches of explosives somewhere too. My guess is that this is not going to end well.

 

I'm disappointed and slightly surprised by the complete lack of human rights charities and the like calling for a boycott of Chinese goods. I guess people like cheap iPads too much to really care.


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#132 Jeff

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 1627 PM

It looks like the PRC has turned to the brownshirts white T-shirt guys to sort things out. There were some mutterings on the news this morning about finding caches of explosives somewhere too. My guess is that this is not going to end well.

 

I'm disappointed and slightly surprised by the complete lack of human rights charities and the like calling for a boycott of Chinese goods. I guess people like cheap iPads too much to really care.

Champions of freedom and liberty.


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#133 sunday

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 1659 PM

Chinese copy of the famous "polite little green men"?

 

Of course, as these are a Chinese copy, the politeness suffers.


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#134 Nobu

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 1738 PM

...slightly surprised by the complete lack of human rights charities and the like calling for a boycott of Chinese goods.

 

Trump's endorsement of the Chinese leadership's handling of the protests a few hours ago does not inspire confidence in the possibility of their doing so anytime soon.

 

It also does not inspire confidence in the autonomy of the human rights movement as something other than a policy tool in various ways.


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#135 rmgill

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 1907 PM

When Trump says undiplomatic things about foreign governments. He's wrong. When he says diplomatic things, he's wrong. 

On the other hand, the army of silicon valley and woke news publications care little about real ethics, they'll take money from Jeffry Epstein Publicists OR from the Chinese government for what ever they will pay, ethics be damned. 


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#136 rmgill

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Posted 22 July 2019 - 1910 PM


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#137 JasonJ

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 0709 AM

Protesters using a cone and some liquid, maybe just water, on tear gas.


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#138 Stuart Galbraith

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 0722 AM

I am in absolute awe here. There have their drill down slick. :)


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#139 JasonJ

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 0728 AM

Yeah, I thought it was well done too.


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#140 Nobu

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 0823 AM

Unless the anarchist cookbook has become required reading in Hong Kong's public schools, those do not look exactly like your everyday Hongkongese.

 

More like ANTIFA.


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